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Hey everbody,

It sounds kind of stupid to ask this, but I feel I have to check back with a few of you to know everything's still fine with me ;)

I'm currently doing Starting Strength for my challenge and I've "progressed" to a point, where, when I come home in the evening after workout, I feel empty...or crazy tired as the title says. This feeling pretty much stays with me non-stop now, as the day between workouts, I feel simililarly and just want to go to bed early.

This has put some strain on my relationship, as of course, I want to spend some quality time with my gf when we're both home.

 

I think the two most common reasons for feeling tired should be well  covered, as I eat around 2700kcals each day with enough protein (around 100-120g) and I now sleep well above my usual 6 hours a night...so more like 8ish.

 

Could this be from a kind of CNS "overload" due to the unaccustomed heavy weights during (I think particularly) DLs?

I'm at a point in the program where I will only DL every second workout and instead try to add in the power clean.

 

In all honesty, what I want to know: Everything alright? Any tips or tricks? Words of encouragment? :)

Thanks a bunch.

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First of, if I only eat 2700kcal a day I feel like a zombie 24/7. Maintenance for me is around 4000kcal.

 

It doesn't have to be the problem though, CNS overload is a possibility. Deadlifts are known to be the most likely to cause it and there are people out there who will feel like shit if they deadlift heavy more than once a week.

 

You're gonna have to experiment a bit, I'd say slowly ramp up your caloric intake. You're combining HIIT with heavy lifting, your body needs its fuel. If you don't want to eat more I suggest temporarely dropping HIIT. To me it really sounds like you're trying to do to much on to little fuel.

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You're combining HIIT with heavy lifting, your body needs its fuel. If you don't want to eat more I suggest temporarely dropping HIIT. To me it really sounds like you're trying to do to much on to little fuel.

 

This. CNS 'overload' isn't a thing, it just your body not recovering properly and being floored by systemic fatigue. Eat more or do less are basically your options here :)

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Hey everbody,

It sounds kind of stupid to ask this, but I feel I have to check back with a few of you to know everything's still fine with me ;)

I'm currently doing Starting Strength for my challenge and I've "progressed" to a point, where, when I come home in the evening after workout, I feel empty...or crazy tired as the title says. This feeling pretty much stays with me non-stop now, as the day between workouts, I feel simililarly and just want to go to bed early.

This has put some strain on my relationship, as of course, I want to spend some quality time with my gf when we're both home.

 

I think the two most common reasons for feeling tired should be well  covered, as I eat around 2700kcals each day with enough protein (around 100-120g) and I now sleep well above my usual 6 hours a night...so more like 8ish.

 

Could this be from a kind of CNS "overload" due to the unaccustomed heavy weights during (I think particularly) DLs?

I'm at a point in the program where I will only DL every second workout and instead try to add in the power clean.

 

In all honesty, what I want to know: Everything alright? Any tips or tricks? Words of encouragment? :)

Thanks a bunch.

Two things:

1. 8 hours sleep is like the minimum you want/ need.

2. Are you doing 5 sets or 3 sets of each exercise? You could consider making the switch to 3 if you haven't.

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Hey there, well at 2700 I still manage to gain nearly 2lbs a week. So it's more than maintanance ;)

As for the hiit stuff:I currently don't do any, just a bit of yoga stretching.

I guess I'll have to check and experiment a bit. I'll see how it goes with less DLs. Otherwise I'll try and up my sleep. If that doesn't work I might have to figure something more drastic ;)

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Are you tracking accurately and how long have you been gaining 2lb per week?

Unless you're a 95lb granny, you shouldn't be gaining 2lb a week consistently at 2700 calories doing strength training.

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Okay, I checked back with my logs.

I went from 65 kg to just over 70 in 10 weeks (11 actually, but one of those I didn't log at all and I just about broke even). This means 11 lbs in 10 weeks so a bit over 1lb per week.

In this time I was doing 1 month of bodyweight three times a week and then started on the starting strength stuff.

 

I try to log my food pretty accurately, but I tend to stop logging once I hit my goal (I also stop eating mostly, so that's alright). My scales are not all that great, but I keep to the same protocol and take measurements every day, so I can see nice trend lines even if there is noise in the data.

 

All I wanted to say with the "I'm gaining 2lbs a week" (which is closer to 1lb, I admit) is that I don't think I eat too little (since my body obviously still has left-over-calories to put on my belly)...

Today (Sunday) I feel pretty awesome and not tired at all. My last workout was Friday evening, so maybe I'm just a bit slow to recover...?

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I try to log my food pretty accurately, but I tend to stop logging once I hit my goal (I also stop eating mostly, so that's alright). My scales are not all that great, but I keep to the same protocol and take measurements every day, so I can see nice trend lines even if there is noise in the data.

 

Accurately = weighing everything (at the very least everything calorie-dense) in grammes and logging everything you eat and drink all the time. It's very easy to under-estimate.

 

That said, gaining c500g per week is more probable than c.1100g. I'm perfectly happy working in metric... I'm not 'Murican. :P

 

Anyway, back to the point... Kidney Bean brings up the very, very valid point of how much you're sleeping.

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Okay okay, sorry for the slight exageration. Was more to prove a point ;)

 

Dispite appearances, I do weight pretty much everything. I have a fixed breakfast, which I copy/paste everyday. Lunch is "out of a box", so I can just scan it and dinner I cook myself, so I weigh it. As for snacks, there is my standard protein-shake thingy I have the measurements of, as well as things like "a glass of milk" or "5 peacans" and so on :)

 

I'll try to get some more sleep, but just fyi: I usually just wake up earlier when I try to sleep more than 8 hours. My body seems to have a decent internal clock. Maybe I have to rewire it a bit. It's mostly at the end of the day that I feel more tired than my sitting-in-front-of-pc job can account for ;)

 

Well, here's to hoping it's just a phase and I got too little sunlight or something.

 

PS: Just thought the majority here would enjoy not having to translate all the numbers into another system...^^

 

PPS: Just realized I didn't answer the question about sets/reps. I usually do 3 sets of 5 with a stagnating number of warmup sets while increasing weight (5,5,3,2 reps at bar/x/y/80%). Just DLs I only do a single set, as sugguested.

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My advice then would be you need more sleep. If you wake up too early, then either:

A. Force/ train yourself to sleep in later. Don't take no for an answer- Use curtains to block morning light etc etc.

B. Go to sleep earlier. Try to avoid screens 20-30mins if you can.

C. Both.

Also, If you're tired at the end of the workday, you could just need a small snack/ hit of sugar to perk you up, like an apple or what have you.

Good bulking progress, though!

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Besides calories, which are probably fine since you're gaining weight, and sleep, which is the next likely culprit, could be your protein. You weigh roughly 155 lb. Your minimum protein is really about 130g, with a goal of 155g, especially if you're lean. Might want to take a week at those levels and see how it helps.

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Yep. How is the fat/carb split? Too low carbs can cause energy suckage. You can try loading 50-100g of your carbs to be around your workout to see if that helps, I know it does for me. Back when I tried keto/no carbs, I would DL and then go pass out on the living room floor for a 30 min nap every time.

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I'm not following any low-carb diet. So I hope it shouldn't be a problem. The last two weeks I ate a chicken sandwich about 2 hours before I went to the weight room and somewhere within an hour of coming home either dinner or a shake.

(Data says carbs around 200 and fats around 120 in general)

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So just out of curiosity:  What do you do for work and how do you get there?  We are much more than sleep, eat, gym,  in reality.

 

As for there being "no such thing" as CNS overload.  Call it what you like, there totally is.  Source:  well me (been there, done that), and several people I know who were in the military and were like "yeah, dummy, you're doing too much."  Your brain is funny like that.  If you are seriously stressed about something in your life, its going to throw your cortisol off and mess with your energy levels.  There are SO many things.  You won't actually know if you're eating the right calories if this is the case, since your body will be in total freakout mode.  Are your lifts stalling? 

 

My advice:  Back off everything for 2 weeks at most and see how you feel.  Address any stress or other issues.  Then ease back in.

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I'm working as a research assistant at my old uni and I bike there (it's only like 10minutes or so).

Well, I'll keep with the current weight until I hit the stalling/plateauing defined in starting strength for now. (stall three times, back up, try ramp up again, if you stall again soon after-> no longer novice)

 

Thanks for all the advice :)

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Well, I haven't stalled and I'm still a novice. So no need to rush the horses ^^

This was just an example of a possible progression that was layed out in the book.

 

For now the plan is to at least stick with it for another 6 week challenge and then maybe madcow or something my way further, depending on my goals at that time.

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