• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Thrillho

Upright Heavybag Question

Recommended Posts

I really want to get an upright heavybag and replace my homemade hanging bag. I don't really have anywhere to put it in my place, anyways.

 

One problem... all of the upright heavybags seem really flimsy.  Even the one with the 250lb base, the video shows them tapping it gently, as though afraid to hurt the poor little bag. I'm worried one good kick or one good hook could completely flip the sucker.

 

Does anyone have any experience with upright bags? Can you actually hit them? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I own and regularly train on the XXL Wavemaster. http://www.amazon.com/Century-Wavemaster-XXL-Training-Black/dp/B000EZWPM2

 

Pros:  Don't have to reinforce joists to hang, set up almost anywhere, have seen them take punishment from a trained Muay Thai fighter without a lot of problems, not sure about long term viability...but the short term worked well for the needs. Works great for TKD and really most non-push kicks, good for working on hand and foot combos at full speed, without needing wraps or gloves.  

 

Cons:  Will NOT condition hands or legs like a regular heavy bag will.  On push type kicks (think TKD side kicks, and front push kick) the bag will move and I have seen them fall over, it does take a good high hit, but can and does happen.  I have knocked ours over (with 300lbs of sand in bottom) with a jump side kick, and seen them knocked over with a wheel kick.  If you have powerful blows, the bag can kind of run away from you in the direction it is hit.  My main complaint personally is the sudden rocking back it does after a good high push kick (it sucks when you are training to do a jump kick and it doesn't fall all the way over but comes back up unexpectedly because you thought it was all the way down...my wife got a few laughs out of it lol).  

 

Overall, I like the bag and is about the best for my personal situation.  But I wish I had a hanging heavy bag to compliment it.  I have used the smaller wavemasters and prefer the big ones because they don't move as much when kicking.  I used a BOB a handful of times, for punching, knees and elbows I have had no problem.  Strong head level push kicks can knock them over as well.  But that's just inherent in the design.  And depending on your training may or may not be an issue.  Working on the more "self defense" oriented attacks, (jabs, cross, hook, uppercuts, knees, elbows, rib level kicks, etc) I have not had any major problems.  I am not the strongest puncher in the world though so YMMV.  Sorry for the rambling response, hope it helps a little.        

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am 6'4", 260 lbs, and a heavy puncher, BUT I'm mostly looking for something for cardio and endurance training, 100% speed, maybe 50% power. I'm in a rental, and can't hang anything.  

 

Good to know, thanks! That's pretty similar to the ones at the sports centre (look almost identical) so I will bash those around and see how they feel. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They suck. The double-end bag did it best for me when it came to speed, accuracy, timing, rhythm. If you're going for accuracy and "trigger pulling" drills, the standing one with the face might help you out a bit. But the point of hitting a bag is to learn how to throw power shots or volume combinations, and a free-standing one probably isn't going to allow you to do that. Plus it's pretty awkward with that big heavy base.

 

I'd say for cardio and endurance training, get your hands on the Bas Rutten Workout CDs instead.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a freestanding bag and I never had a problem with them. I'm only 5'7" and 160 lbs, so I'm not Mike Tyson, but I can hit pretty hard for my size, and it never even came close to tipping over, though it does rock a bit and the base moves after a while. If you are still worried, try shadow boxing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's really the difference between free weights and machines. Free standing bags being like the machines with cables. You can get a good workout, but they aren't amazing for power, since the weight isn't behind your punches, like a typical heavy bag. If you punch a freestanding bag with 300 lbs. of sand, it's not going to feel like 300 at the top, where you're hitting it, but when you punch a 100 lbs. heavy bag, you're well aware that you're hitting 100 lbs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Dojo has the Bob XL as well as the XXL wave master both have pros and cons. Nothing will replace a good hanging heavy bag in my opinion but if it's not an option then I like the Bob XL. I am a big guy and I know I hit hard. I have trained martial arts for a while now and I can hit the Bob XL when the base is totally full of water at about 80-90% without knocking it completely over. It does move and rock around some but only when I try to knock it over does it fall over. I have yet to see or hear of a freestanding heavy bag that is impossible to knock over. One thing I also like about the Bob XL is that my dojo has had one for over 5 years with a few dozen students giving it real heavy use every week and it still looks/performs like new. If you had one in your house and were the only one using it I bet it would last you forever. I know Century has a line of bags out called the VerSys version 1-3 I think. They look interesting but I've never had any hands on experience with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the dojos I trained at used them extensively as there were limited hanging bags, and more students than bags, so the free standing ones made up the difference. I got on a lot of time on these bags while there. At 250lbs I could lay into one full force repeatedly with hard roundhouse kicks with no real problem, it would rock back and forth, but there was no danger of knocking it over. The annoying part was that they do tend to run away from you while you're working, but hey, footwork, right?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the risk of echoing what other people have already said:Free standing bags move around a lot, and if you push with any real force they're going to wobble/fall over, but I figure half of the exercise is chasing the damn bag around and picking it up when you get too enthusiastic.

 

Plus, if you're throwing your non-push techniques right, the bag might get a little bit of motion to it, but it shouldn't ever fall over, which makes it a decent indicator for when you're pushing too much instead of actually hitting.

 

The only major down side is that unless you get one of the XL bags where the padding goes almost to the floor, you're cutting out a pretty significant contact area, which makes it difficult to practice any knee-level kicks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now