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Marenkix

Anyone practising Krav Maga here?

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I've been thinking of starting Krav Maga in January and have done research of it, of course. But it would be great to hear about it straight from the people themselves :) So, if you could just leave a few words of what you've thought of it and if it's worth it in the end I would be really, really grateful! 

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Hi

 

Trained in Krav and hope to return to it soon.

 

my thoughts...its amazing!

 

Depending on how the class is run, it can be an evening of activity and new skills. It was taught to be functional with a broad range of scenario driven training and how one technique can be used in a variety of situations, it also taught you that running away is the first and best technique to try.

 

Everyone i know that knew me when i was training would probably tell you i was at my best physically and mentally.

 

And i really hope to return to it sometime early 2015!

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Thank you so much for your reply! You got me really, really interested and I feel like I just have to try it out now! :D 

 

Also sounds like it does teach skills that you can use in real life. If they make running away your first objective in a fight it already sounds smart :) Definitely going to check it out. I found a place that offered 5 months with classes twice a week that only cost 145 euros in total. Feeling like I've got nothing to loose by trying it out! 

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Hi

 

Trained in Krav and hope to return to it soon.

 

my thoughts...its amazing!

 

Depending on how the class is run, it can be an evening of activity and new skills. It was taught to be functional with a broad range of scenario driven training and how one technique can be used in a variety of situations, it also taught you that running away is the first and best technique to try.

 

Everyone i know that knew me when i was training would probably tell you i was at my best physically and mentally.

 

And i really hope to return to it sometime early 2015!

I can second this. The mentality that was taught to me, was to run away first... if you can't then do as much damage as quick as possible, then run away at the first sign of being able to.

 

I was also taught mainly "gross motor skills" instead of "fine motor skills" http://www.babycenter.com/404_whats-the-difference-between-fine-and-gross-motor-skills_6562.bc

 

This is good in that it's easier to do gross motor skills when under attack. An example is an eye poke... Fine motor skills would be taking one finger, and poking them in the eye... gross motor would be pointing all 5 fingers forward and just jabbing at their face.

 

It will toughen you up...be prepared for bruises and a bit of discomfort...but it makes you feel alive!!! :highly_amused:

HAHAHA... Yes... I've never been so happy with getting kicked in the throat...

 

Is it worth it.... yes. While I'm no longer in it, and have moved over to Muay Thai, that's only because the Muay Thai place has a gym I can use as a result of a membership there, and there's the added bonus of being a bit cheaper.

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If you want to combine a full body fitness program with your martial arts training, you may want to go to a krav maga fitness franchise. I see traditional martial arts purists rolling their eyes at this suggestion, but I think it would be a good starting point to get in initial shape for any other martial art.

 

Many arts specialize (wrestling, judo, akido, BJJ, Tae Kwan Do) and you can learn muscle memory designed for just that circumstance. I am still trying to unlearn the way I used to stand in Tae Kwan Do 20 years ago. That stance was good for a long kick situation. It was horrible for other situations. Wrestlers will put one hand down in front of their lead knee for example. I'm sure they have to unlearn that.

 

A good Krav Maga school may not teach you everything a specialty art may teach you, but it will not teach you bad muscle memory/stress response habits that some very legitimate specialty arts may instill.  Even if it's just a krav maga workout, you will still probably have to keep your hands up the whole time, you wont cross your legs when move laterally, etc.. Those small things are invaluable for your initial art.

 

I've talked to several people who have taken the non-"fitness franchise" krav maga and they have nothing but positive things to say. Much of the standard catalog matches with techniques proven in MMA and police/military training, so the catalog is well tested.

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So the replies here make me feel like I really have chosen well. Thank you so much for the time you've taken to write out these replies, I really appreciate it! Now I'll just have to wait until January 10th to see how it is going to be for me. Gah, I can't wait!

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I want to join our Krav Maga school so badly, but they only have classes while I'm working. ;-;

 

Apparently the guy who runs ours is super helpful when it comes to losing weight and getting healthy. He works side by side with his students because he was over 100 pounds overweight at one point. He's got a pretty cool story, so he welcomes people of all fitness levels without judging. :3 Wanna go. 

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I had a really amazing experience learning Krav Maga at MacDonald Academy of Martial Arts, just outside of Boston.

 

The Level 1 program is really well done, staying focused on the basics that are the most useful.  Level 2 gets into sparring and a bit more grappling if you want.

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I've been thinking of starting Krav Maga in January and have done research of it, of course. But it would be great to hear about it straight from the people themselves :) So, if you could just leave a few words of what you've thought of it and if it's worth it in the end I would be really, really grateful! 

Yep,

 

Been training in Krav for 1 1/2 years, love it, passed my level two test 6 months into it (currently that is all the gym I belong to offers) but the instructors we have a great.

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Ummm so I have been in a few lessons right now and it has been really fun! But also terrifying. So so terrifying. I think that has a lot to do with the teachers off handedly telling us how dead we'd be in real life situations and the fact I'm the youngest, about 2 heads shorter than the average student there and one of the only three women ;_; 

 

So far the biggest challenge has been to not run away when you're supposed to block a punch during pair practise xD Hopefully I'll get a bit more courage with time :)

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Revy

 

It comes with time...but ultimately never lose the fear! its what keeps you alive :D

 

one of my worst fears was being hit/hurt...before taking on martial arts I had never really been in that situation...after a few accidents in training I didn't feel too concerned I realised it hurt...but didn't kill me...and you just get up/rub your nose/your chin/hobble about on your newly broken toe and you smile and get back to it.

 

Look at it this way, you are now part of an organised and structured fight club :D

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Ummm so I have been in a few lessons right now and it has been really fun! But also terrifying. So so terrifying. I think that has a lot to do with the teachers off handedly telling us how dead we'd be in real life situations and the fact I'm the youngest, about 2 heads shorter than the average student there and one of the only three women ;_; 

 

So far the biggest challenge has been to not run away when you're supposed to block a punch during pair practise xD Hopefully I'll get a bit more courage with time :)

That's how it works... you'll get more comfortable as it goes, and next thing you know, your reaction will be to break the opponents nose instead of run. :-)

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I've been doing Krav Now for about 8 months. My gym has technique, sparring and conditioning classes. We have such a diverse group of people: MMA guys, cops, women taking it for self defense, people doing it for fitness, etc. I love it! I've dabbled in other martial arts: Karate, Tae Kwon Do, Jiu Jitsu and Jeet Kune Do, but I've stuck with Krav the longest because the instructors and philosophy of Krav really clicked with me. They really focus on practical stuff. What other people said "gross motor skills" and running away is definitely on point.

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Does anyone else find their back gets sore from punching? I took a few weeks off, came back and now my back muscles are dying! I'm wondering if I'm rotating too much when I punch.

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Does anyone else find their back gets sore from punching? I took a few weeks off, came back and now my back muscles are dying! I'm wondering if I'm rotating too much when I punch.

I don't think it's too much, I think you're just not used to it anymore.

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Most western back problems (80 percent or more) are caused by tight hamstrings. Women sometimes get additional problem in their upper back due to muscle tightening from "stress". I learned this from the Army and V.A. when I had back pain, I didn't just get it from a junk science site. Live strong has an article on it....

http://www.livestrong.com/article/335227-hamstring-stretches-lower-back-pain/

If there are some real trainers or coaches in some of the larger forums, you might ask them, I'm not qualified to give medical advise. But I doubt it's as simple as a punching technique.

Buy the way, good on you for staying in tune with any sort of chronic pain. I just learned that I was in danger of complicating a potentially surgery level case of tendonitis because I just felt the pain was strange and I listened to my body. Keep asking questions like "why does my back hurt from punching", it keeps you from getting long term injuries.

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Just run around stuff... it's less painful.. :-)

Passing an obstacle by going around it IS GOOD PARKOUR which is why they call it "Passing" and obstacle. Above fails is why my old fat A$$ does low line. Lowline parkour is the safest/most effective way for YOU to get YOUR body in/over/around/through an obstacle, Free running is the most awesome way to do it. And the most painfull when you fail.

P.S. while that fail compilation was AWSOME entertainment, Ukimi is just as important to Tracours as it is to martial artists

And, of course, the best Free Runner/Wushu Tricker ever.....My Man, Jackie Chan....

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So I'm pretty sure I'm on this thread just to complain about training soreness. . . but today I can't write manually because we did so many 360 blocks yesterday and my hands are still shaking! I'm working at a new job and I wish there was a non awkward way to let everyone know that all the bruises on my arms are from Krav.

 

Anyway, level two test in 4 weeks and I'm super excited! Have any of you done testing before?

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So I'm pretty sure I'm on this thread just to complain about training soreness. . . but today I can't write manually because we did so many 360 blocks yesterday and my hands are still shaking! I'm working at a new job and I wish there was a non awkward way to let everyone know that all the bruises on my arms are from Krav.

 

Anyway, level two test in 4 weeks and I'm super excited! Have any of you done testing before?

hahahaha.... Just respond "You should see the other guy"...

 

In reality, I would just tell em you're taking a self defense course, and that class was particularly brutal on your arms.

 

I've done one test, it's not much different from your class, other than there's more people and you're being "graded". I wouldn't stress about it.

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It's just a matter of conditioning, and I'm not sure I'm quite there yet. Our tests are 5 hours long: 1 hour of conditioning to tire you out, 1 hour of class for questions on technique, then 3 hours of actually testing on the level 1 material. Right now 2 hours is a struggle, so I'm just going to pace myself and tough it out. I have til March 18th to gain more endurance.

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I signed up for a free class in my area and am very excited to start this! Hopping this plus wieght training, a good diet, and hiking preperes me well

I can't help but notice, you say prepare, and your avatar is the USMC logo.... you going in?

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