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Is it safe then to start experimenting with basic poses by myself until I can organize myself to find an instructor?

Is it safe to try that Ying yoga thing by myself as a beginner?

 

It is safe so long as your allignment is correct; either find credible sources via youtube or read up on websites such as Gaiam or Yoga Journal (both offer great routines/tips/pose breakdowns for beginners). 

Same goes for yin, although, with yin, you will need some props- blocks, bolster, belts. I don't know how easy it is for you to gain access to these (if you have the money, buy online), but some good substitutes include several blankets/towels, cushions/heavy pillows, and old t-shirts/towels for 'belts'. Props are good for beginners and help you to ease into a pose much easier. 

Yogi Nora (on youtube) has a GREAT Yin yoga sequence on youtube Yin Yoga: Deep Stretches for flexibility, meditation and a peaceful mind with Yogi Nora 

 

And here's why not both: I can hardly find an instructor for the one, where am I to fnd a master for rhe second?

 

I am not sure which instructor you are referring to-Qigong or yoga? For Qigong, I honestly do not know where you may find an instructor. With yoga, it is getting a little easier. If there are gyms near you, hopefully one of them offers yoga classes; if so, reach out to the instructor there and see if you could work privately with him or her. I have heard of online yoga classes that are taken live, but you will have to do a little research on that; if you find a program that you can afford and partake in, I once again will encourage you to speak out. Given that the teacher will not physically be there to correct your allignment concerns me, but I have been told that it usually works out fine in the end. Again, experiment around, research, and don't give up hope!

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I was really confused and slightly annoyed by the yoga practice I attended yesterday. Everyone lay on their mats in a heated dark room, and the instructor just talked the whole time. She said do whatever you gotta do with your body, but there were no postures.

She claimed to do Reiki work on everyone, which basically just consisted of going around and touching peoples heads for 10 seconds apiece. And vibrational work, which was her singing something about a cucumber? And having us all go eeeee, aaaaah, oooh. It was very strange, & I was pretty disappointed as I was expecting a physical experience.

What would you even call that? I tracked it in my fitocracy as being just a meditation session because I didn't know what else to call it.

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Battle Log    Challenges:  1, 2

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I was really confused and slightly annoyed by the yoga practice I attended yesterday. Everyone lay on their mats in a heated dark room, and the instructor just talked the whole time. She said do whatever you gotta do with your body, but there were no postures.

She claimed to do Reiki work on everyone, which basically just consisted of going around and touching peoples heads for 10 seconds apiece. And vibrational work, which was her singing something about a cucumber? And having us all go eeeee, aaaaah, oooh. It was very strange, & I was pretty disappointed as I was expecting a physical experience.

What would you even call that? I tracked it in my fitocracy as being just a meditation session because I didn't know what else to call it.

Sorry, I had to chuckle at this. 

 

Reiki healing is for… how shall I word this, for mixed palates, so to speak; the sushi of the wellness world. Some people LOVE Reiki, and have found results, and others feel the complete opposite. 

 

Your class almost reminds me of ashtanga yoga… in those classes, especially the advanced series ones, there is very little guidance. 

 

With chanting, I feel for you. Yet again, it can make or break a class. Some people love it, others, well, not so much. It happened to me the first time I ever practiced in a traditional studio setting. We started and ending the class with a loud, resounding series of 'Ooooommmmmsssss' that completely threw me off guard; it felt strange. Now, I don't mind it too much, but for my personal practice, I tend to exclude it. 

 

So for the most part, I assume you were in a mostly meditative, somewhat restorative class. If you did not enjoy it, don't take it, but at least you gained some exposure into another system of 'healing' and proceeding inward. Again, some people prefer these classes, and I take it you are not one of them.

 

Hopefully that instructor stilled paid enough attention to correct anyone in their allignment if something was off. 

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Here's a sort of 'repost' from an answer I have given countless times, which is yin yoga-

On the days you are doing said bodyweight exercises, which are considered as 'yang' practices, create balance with yin yoga (or again, something gentle and restorative). This is my recommendation not only in a philosophical manner, but also a practical one. You have broken muscle tissue down, and any aggressive and fasted paced yoga can result in overtraining. The opposite of yang, yin, encourages recovery, as you help to repair the muscles and the connective tissues, therefore saving your joints and encouraging deeper strength (the more you lengthen and save the muscles during a yin-promoting practice, the more strength/muscle you could build as a result; if you should ever find yourself injured, and have practiced yin style yoga, the recovery process can be reduced drastically and the severity lessened because you have smooth, flexible tissue- hard, stiff muscles that lack flexibility are even harder to heal once they've been seriously injured). 

With yoga you do get the body+mind benefits. As for recommendations, here is a list:

On Youtube:

Yin Yoga: Deep Stretches for flexibility, meditation and a peaceful mind with Yogi Nora

60 minutes Yin Yoga for the Spine.

45 minute Hip Opening Yoga Class

Yin Yoga

Dragon pose,

Yin Yoga

Yoga for Opening the Shoulders

Yoga Twists

Restorative Yoga Sequence

Relax & Restore Yoga: Sadie Nardini- BeFit Yoga

POWER STRETCHING YOGA WARM UP.m4v

COOLING YOGA POSES FOR CHILLAXING!

 

If you want links to more videos that involve flow-based, faster movements, let me know! Since you wrote down that you practice P90X, I assume that you are looking for gentle, restorative routines?

 

DVD's (I am not too informed about what is 'good', but here are my recommendations coming from personal experience.)

 

http://www.amazon.com/Anatomy-Yoga-Paul-Grilley/dp/B000A1GEUE

                      Yin Yoga: The Foundations of a Quiet Practice 

Amazon.com: Tara Stiles This is Yoga : 4 DVD Set : Complete Yoga … (Try the relax routine; if you are still new to yoga, stick to this one or the beginner's sequence for now)

 

A fantastic teacher who leads yin-style yoga sequences is Paul Grilley; he has more DVD's as well as books for you to check out.

 

Let me know if there is anything more I can do to help!

Thank you!  It will take a while to digest all of the information but I have bookmarked your links and will revisit this thread often to learn as much as possible.  Lots of great questions and answers here.

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Thank you!  It will take a while to digest all of the information but I have bookmarked your links and will revisit this thread often to learn as much as possible.  Lots of great questions and answers here.

Thank you! Keep coming back, and I will also add that if you (or anyone else) prefers I really dive in and dissect a question, I can do so on my blog.

 

Take care!

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Hello, thank you so much for opening yourself up for questions! 

 

I am in the beginning phases of yoga. I took quite a few classes (20+) a couple of years ago and I'm starting back up again. My goal is to increase mindfulness, decrease anxiety, and promote inner peace. My time slot to do this is the hours before bed time. I'm actually quite flexible for a big girl and able to do some harder poses.

 

The problem I had at the time I took classes (and am still not sure how to address) is my fat. Specifically, my belly fat. The yoga instructor I had before (at a YMCA type club) didn't really have an answer. My belly is in the way and prevents me from doing poses correctly. Do you have any recommendations for relaxation and stress reduction yoga for someone with more of a round body shape? 

 

FWIW, I am in the process of working to reduce the size of this issue LOL but I don't want to wait to do yoga. 

 

Thanks again, appreciate any feedback! :) PeachyPeach

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I finally took a yin class as the last session of my two week pass. Holy moly. I walked out of there feeling like I was waking up from a really great nap!! I finally found that feeling everyone says they get from yoga. When and if I return to that studio, now I know which class to go to.

I just wanted to thank you again, it really is very generous of you to give your time and knowledge to the collective good.

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Hello, thank you so much for opening yourself up for questions! 

 

I am in the beginning phases of yoga. I took quite a few classes (20+) a couple of years ago and I'm starting back up again. My goal is to increase mindfulness, decrease anxiety, and promote inner peace. My time slot to do this is the hours before bed time. I'm actually quite flexible for a big girl and able to do some harder poses.

 

The problem I had at the time I took classes (and am still not sure how to address) is my fat. Specifically, my belly fat. The yoga instructor I had before (at a YMCA type club) didn't really have an answer. My belly is in the way and prevents me from doing poses correctly. Do you have any recommendations for relaxation and stress reduction yoga for someone with more of a round body shape? 

 

FWIW, I am in the process of working to reduce the size of this issue LOL but I don't want to wait to do yoga. 

 

Thanks again, appreciate any feedback! :) PeachyPeach

No, you shouldn't wait to practice yoga- unless there is a pressing medical reason- and the size of your body should not be a restriction.

Unfortunately, teaching yoga to prospective students of your shape can be a tad tricky, but certainly not problematic or shameful. It just takes a little problem-solving and modifications here and there. And the good news is, more and more teachers are learning to address this growing demand, and a few trainings to help remedy it are becoming widely available.

I myself am not too familiar with this area, to be honest, but I can suggest a few tips and provide some links that I hope will help you out.

As I have stated numerous times in this thread, you must always, always be mindful of your allignment. No matter the size or shape, adhere to proper allignment to protect your body. There are zero exceptions. 

Also, for relaxation/meditative benefits, I would suggest finding some audio recordings via youtube or for download that you can use to first follow along to so you can get the idea of entering a state of relaxation. Once you have a good grasp of this, incorporate it into an intuitive yoga practice.

What is that? An intuitive yoga practice is one where you, the yogi, tap into your instincts and authentic self. You are the pilot, the master in control, if you will. The entire sequence lasts as long as you want, and can be as difficult or as restorative as you choose to let it be. Since you have practiced yoga for quite some time, I am sure you know how to perform a variety of positions. If you can practice in front of a mirror to help you check in on your allignment, even better; if not, be very careful. Otherwise, play the meditation CD in the background as you perform your asana. 

I would also recommend, as always, yin yoga; it will be safer on your joints and promote flexibility, nervous system balance, and mental restoration, as much of yin works inside the mind in addition to the body as you 'let go' and release not only physical tension into a pose but also mental ones as well. 

When you say doing a pose 'correctly', do you mean the full extension? Many people, regardless of size, often struggle to do the same. If you need to modify a position because of your shape, do not worry! One, as you said, in your case, it will eventually come to pass, as all things do; celebrate the journey! Two, check your ego in at the door, and ask yourself what is more important- being able to safely execute a sequence or pose without any harm, or doing it just to please others or compete? Something to keep in mind.

 

Here are some resources I have found that I hope will provide some benefit to you; I am glad to hear that you have spoken with your instructor about this matter beforehand, and encourage you to continue doing so, and reach out to other teachers as well to hear their input as well.

 

(Also, side not, I hope I am not offending you- it feels like walking on pins and needles while writing this. I also am not a fan of the titles of some of these suggestions, but I spent the majority of last night researching some links that I hope will be of some use to you. If not, let's put our thinking caps on and find the best solution for YOU.)

 

Youtube and Articles:

 

WEIGHT LOSS YOGA FOR OVERWEIGHT YOGIS [OR ANYONE] PART 1 OF 4

Beginners Yoga Video - non-weight bearing yoga for beginners, injured or overweight people

https://www.youtube.com/user/bodypositiveyoga/videos

https://www.youtube.com/user/CurvyYoga/videos

 

http://www.decolonizingyoga.com/category/full-figure-yoga/

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-13930/6-yoga-tips-for-anyone-with-a-bigger-body.html

 

 

DVD's:

http://www.amazon.com/Big-Yoga-Simple-Bigger-Bodies/dp/0757002153

Big Yoga Flex-Ability

HeavyWeight Yoga: Yoga for the Body You Have Today

Big Yoga Beginners Hatha 1

Expanding into Fullness, Yoga for Large Women with Sally Pugh DVD815597011021

 

Books:

Yoga XXL: A Journey to Health For Larger…

MegaYoga: The First Yoga Program for Curvy Women

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I finally took a yin class as the last session of my two week pass. Holy moly. I walked out of there feeling like I was waking up from a really great nap!! I finally found that feeling everyone says they get from yoga. When and if I return to that studio, now I know which class to go to.

I just wanted to thank you again, it really is very generous of you to give your time and knowledge to the collective good.

Awww- well, thank YOU, yes, YOU, for taking care of yourself and finding some gold! Keep it up, you awesome yogi!

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Hello, thank you so much for opening yourself up for questions! 

 

I am in the beginning phases of yoga. I took quite a few classes (20+) a couple of years ago and I'm starting back up again. My goal is to increase mindfulness, decrease anxiety, and promote inner peace. My time slot to do this is the hours before bed time. I'm actually quite flexible for a big girl and able to do some harder poses.

 

The problem I had at the time I took classes (and am still not sure how to address) is my fat. Specifically, my belly fat. The yoga instructor I had before (at a YMCA type club) didn't really have an answer. My belly is in the way and prevents me from doing poses correctly. Do you have any recommendations for relaxation and stress reduction yoga for someone with more of a round body shape? 

 

FWIW, I am in the process of working to reduce the size of this issue LOL but I don't want to wait to do yoga. 

 

Thanks again, appreciate any feedback! :) PeachyPeach

I think this was one of the Youtube links given, but she has a website and is phenomenal and offers online classes.

Curvy Yoga

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Druid Assassin Halfling

:) Druid  :)

Level 16, Current Quest: Bekah Returns

Spoiler

 

Your life does not get better by chance. It gets better by change.

- Jim Rohn

 

 

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Dear visitors to this thread,

 

First of all, welcome! I hope the previous answers have helped to address any questions you may have had in regards to yoga.

Secondly, for those of you who have either visited this page or want a good starting template for beginner's, I have written a post on my blog that covers some basics for new, prospective yoga students. If your question has not yet been adressed, leave it here in the forums or request a full, in-depth answer that I can formulate and devote an entire post to up on my blog. 

Thanks!

 

Commonality In My Answers

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Happy Birthday Dragon!

 

First off, a quick thank you for doing this thread. I've been looking into yoga as a way of dealing with some ongoing mobility issues, and this thread has given me a lot of information. (Especially Yin Yoga; say what you want about Paulie Zink, the man is insanely flexible.)

4x6.jpg

 

I do have a technical question: I've found that when moving from Downward Dog into Warrior I, I have much more range of motion with my left leg than my right. When stepping forward into the lunge with my left, I can bring it well past the line of my hips, plant it firmly, and rise up into Warrior. With my right, I can't get it much farther forward than my hips. This makes my stance way too short, and I have to shift it forward once I reach vertical. This is especially odd since my right leg is my kicking leg, and I can kick much higher than my waist. I don't have any other mobility issues in my hips; I can move into deep lunges from any other position, just not from Downward Dog.

 

Any ideas?

 

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"If you get into trouble, you can always eat something, blow something up, or throw penguins." - Jim Henson

 

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I'm thinking this is probably still a shoulder mobility issue, but would love your input. 

In attempting to do Camel pose, I can get my right arm to touch my calf, but not my left, it doesn't want to go in that direction at all...and given my shoulders being as tight as they are, I figured that was the problem, but wanted an expert opinion :D

and yes, Happy Birthday!!! :D 

  • Like 1

Druid Assassin Halfling

:) Druid  :)

Level 16, Current Quest: Bekah Returns

Spoiler

 

Your life does not get better by chance. It gets better by change.

- Jim Rohn

 

 

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I'm just getting back into yoga after a few years, took a class at school and LOVED the 'stretchy-rubber-band-gumby' feeling I'd get afterwards. I practice at home, mostly sun salutation, but I've recently started throwing in some balance work and twists. (I just realized I have no idea what the poses are called, sorry if that's important!) I took a class last week with a friend and was pretty disappointed; I didn't get the 'gumby' feeling at all. I'm wondering if I should try a more difficult class, but as I live in a relatively rural area we've got two yoga studios and the other one does hot yoga only. I'm kind of a delicate flower, and their website mentions the following:

  • Stand up/get up slowly from any pose, especially if you have low blood pressure
  • Be careful tilting head back in any pose, especially if you have low blood pressure
  • Rest on the mat or leave the room if you feel overheated, please be discreet

So I'm scared to try it out and pass out, but I really think the first place I went is geared more towards seniors and those with limited mobility. Should I give hot yoga a shot? Or keep going on my own?

 

I did try to search this post but hot is too short, so I apologize if someone has asked this before.

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Happy Birthday Dragon!

 

First off, a quick thank you for doing this thread. I've been looking into yoga as a way of dealing with some ongoing mobility issues, and this thread has given me a lot of information. (Especially Yin Yoga; say what you want about Paulie Zink, the man is insanely flexible.)

4x6.jpg

 

I do have a technical question: I've found that when moving from Downward Dog into Warrior I, I have much more range of motion with my left leg than my right. When stepping forward into the lunge with my left, I can bring it well past the line of my hips, plant it firmly, and rise up into Warrior. With my right, I can't get it much farther forward than my hips. This makes my stance way too short, and I have to shift it forward once I reach vertical. This is especially odd since my right leg is my kicking leg, and I can kick much higher than my waist. I don't have any other mobility issues in my hips; I can move into deep lunges from any other position, just not from Downward Dog.

 

Any ideas?

Thank you!

And wow, nice, he looks AMAZING! Love how happy his expression is. 

Hmm. There are a couple of possibilities to explore here, but first and foremost as long as there is NO pain, you do not have a medical diagnosis or history (personal and/or familial) of structual abnormalities, injuries, bone complications, etc, and you are taking care of yourself nutritionally and physically, you should be fine. 

OK. Now that some house keeping is out of the way, here is my intake:

 

#1: As human beings, we naturally have a biological 'preferance' when it comes to the right and left areas of our body. Right handed or left handed? That concept relates to our entire system, from our eyes all the way down to our feet. If could be that your right side is weaker, and in spite of your training, is still the weakest of the two. Again, while your kicks might be excellent and strong, it will still remain the weaker one. That's not a bad thing at all, really. All of us have a dominant side.

But with yoga, we try (not force) to maintain and create a state of equilibrium. In any position, we have to balance both sides as best as we safely can. For example, in warrior 3, I have to make sure both hips are squared and facing DOWN. One side, however, wants to pop up and put me out of alignment. In order to create a balance and corruct posture in that pose, I need to rely on the strength of my inner muscles, core strength, flexibility, and alignment to twist the thigh of the raised leg so that I can square off my hips. I am essentially putting on a balancing act, trying to get myself to use some deal of power to remain in proper alignment.

With you, your body might be doing so, and will propbably continue to do so. There are cases of people being able to balance both sides efficiently, with very little effort, but such cases are either rare or found in students who have practiced for a significant amount of time.

 

#2: Transitons. How are you transitioning into Warrior (I, II, III?) from Downward Dog? Where do you place your front leg, and are you using enough core strength to do so? I have found that students or yogis with little strength in their (or even an awareness of it) struggle to transition to ANY position from Downward Dog if they forget to really engage their core muscles and step safely into the pose. If you have to grab that food a few inches ahead of you to ensure that you are in proper alignment, don't despair! Again, practice and consistency are what matters most here. There's no race for perfection. You may find yourself having to manually move that foot into its correct position for a period of time, only to (maybe) discover one day that you suddenly can! It's all a journey. 

 

#3: More advice. It's great that you are consulting this forum, but have you also spoken with an instructor in your area? As I cannot observe you in a full class, I have no sense of your body's structure- the little movements in kinks that can tell me where your strengths and weaknesses are. Where is the line of energy coming from? Where is the load centered upon? Are you hypermobile in a certain joint? Etcetera. Your instructor could definitely point you in the right direction, especially one trained in Iyengar Yoga, which has a HUGE emphasis on alignment (great for beginner's and advanced yogis looking to fine-tune and perfect their asana).

 

So, practice makes perfect, my friend. Again, ask around in person to an instructor near you, observe your body and its strengths and weaknesses during your practice, and let me know if there is anything else I can assist you with.

 

Take care, and thanks again for the birthday wishes!

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I'm thinking this is probably still a shoulder mobility issue, but would love your input. 

In attempting to do Camel pose, I can get my right arm to touch my calf, but not my left, it doesn't want to go in that direction at all...and given my shoulders being as tight as they are, I figured that was the problem, but wanted an expert opinion :D

and yes, Happy Birthday!!! :D

Thank you!

 

Kudos to understanding your body.

 

You may indeed need to open up those shoulders a bit more. 

How far are you in experience when it comes to your yoga practice? Camel can be quite difficult for new students; I myself could not do it until I was well into about a year and half of my own practice. 

That being said, as you mentioned you could do part of it with one side, you could try incorporating more upper body postures prior to entering camel position; that way, your muscles are open and nice and warm before you engage in camel. 

 

Instead of reaching down to your calves with your arms, have you considered using blocks instead? They can help a ton! Even for people who are most flexible, using blocks can help you to really dig into those deep muscle fibers that are often hard to reach. I like to liken blocks in yoga to free weights- while your body certainly can reach into those positions, a block can help to isolate the areas you most want to improve upon, and maybe serve as a means of cross-training both for experienced and beginning students.

Here's an example of what I am referring to when it comes to camel pose and blocks-

yoganov18.jpg

(Side Note: I am still figuring out the tools for uploading and pasting images, so apologies in advanced if this blows up in my reply.)

 

Try those tips out, and come back if you need any more help!

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I'm just getting back into yoga after a few years, took a class at school and LOVED the 'stretchy-rubber-band-gumby' feeling I'd get afterwards. I practice at home, mostly sun salutation, but I've recently started throwing in some balance work and twists. (I just realized I have no idea what the poses are called, sorry if that's important!) I took a class last week with a friend and was pretty disappointed; I didn't get the 'gumby' feeling at all. I'm wondering if I should try a more difficult class, but as I live in a relatively rural area we've got two yoga studios and the other one does hot yoga only. I'm kind of a delicate flower, and their website mentions the following:

  • Stand up/get up slowly from any pose, especially if you have low blood pressure
  • Be careful tilting head back in any pose, especially if you have low blood pressure
  • Rest on the mat or leave the room if you feel overheated, please be discreet

So I'm scared to try it out and pass out, but I really think the first place I went is geared more towards seniors and those with limited mobility. Should I give hot yoga a shot? Or keep going on my own?

 

I did try to search this post but hot is too short, so I apologize if someone has asked this before.

Hello! Welcome to this thread! I'll start with your concerns especially with Hot Yoga.

 

I assume you are aware of what a typical Hot Yoga Class entails- a heated room (like a sauna), and a generally challenging sequence. If you have a history of low blood pressure, be very careful when participating in this class. You want to stay hydrated (bring some water with you!), and I would strongly recommend you avoid eating a full or heavy meal an hour and a half prior to the start of class. 

Depending on how new you are to yoga, you may want to sit this one out. People mainly partake in Hot Yoga/Bikram because of the challenging sequence and environment and the 'detoxification' effect that is caused by induced sweating. You could get the best of both worlds by simply practicing yoga on your own and THEN hopping into a sauna. ;) But if you have practiced for at least a year, then you could give it a try- just inform the front desk and instructor that you are a beginner, and to have him or her pay attention to your form.

 

Alright. Now to the 'gumby' feeling. If you are instinctively gravitating towards the initial class you took, then go for it. Even though you are practicing amongst seniors and those with disabilities, it will prove quite beneficial for you to at least start training in it for a while just so you can get a good grasp of the basics and proper alignment. When you have practiced for a good while and have essentially 'mastered' (I hesitate to use that word) the poses/sequences, you can then graduate to classes that are a step above that one, and continue onward; you can even alternate between that one class and another (hot yoga or otherwise). Go with your gut. 

 

With the gumby feeling, one reason why the effect is not as strong is because from the start your body may have been so stiff that to engage in any flexibility exercises would have made it feel so open and loose. Now that it has been opened up, there is much less work from a flexibility standpoint, although in my opinion flexibility is almost limitless in human beings, especially if you look at the works of Ashtanga Yogis, Cirque Du Soleil performors, contortionists, etcetera. But that's one theory.

The other is that the next class you took may not have emphasized the particular areas of your body that needed to be opened up. You can remedy this by effectively training them by yourself at home (while also practicing proper alignment and never forcing your way into a pose), or by informing the instructor that you are tight in those areas. He or she may dedicate the class theme to that specific body part. :) Most yoga classes alter each time, so don't be discouraged if one did not focus on flexibility as much as did with the one before it. 

So, to recap: If you are new to Hot Yoga and your instincts are against it, don't do it. If you would rather stay in a class that makes YOU feel good, then do so, or alternate it with another class; there's no reason why you have to stick to just one. And with flexibility, aka Gumby-ness, keep in mind that each class will probably differ from the next, hence why one class made you feel opened more in a certain area than the other. 

Always listen to your body, and honor it.

 

Hope this helps; come back and let me know if there is anything more I can do!

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Thanks for the feedback.  I believe I’ve figured out the problem.  I did the transitions in front of a mirror at the gym.  Turns out I’m making two mistakes: one, my position in Downward Dog is too wide.  I’ve been focusing on the hamstring stretch and pushing with the shoulders, and not enough on the hip hinge.  Two, when I move my left leg forward, I swing it around wide rather than coming straight through.  This throws my hip and spine alignment off, but it allows for that long, stable lunge stance.  When I move my right leg forward, I go straight through.  This makes for a shorter stance while moving up into Warrior.  If I bring my hands and feet a little closer together in Downward Dog and focus on the mechanics, it works a lot better.

 

For what it’s worth, I’ve been doing vinyasa podcast classes from the Yoga To The People website.  I like the pace and the challenging poses, but it may be a little too advanced for me.  I’ve had a couple of group classes here and there and gotten zero correction from the teachers, so I figured I was doing OK. Time to slow down a little bit, methinks.  More focus on correct mechanics, and less on keeping up with the class and ‘feeling the burn’.

 

Thanks again!

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"If you get into trouble, you can always eat something, blow something up, or throw penguins." - Jim Henson

 

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Hey, I just wanted to let you know I finally found a class on a time I can attend! (Lunch hour.) It's an "integral" practice, which means a bit of everything, not much of anything :) but I really think it's a good thing at this point. I was curious! I'm satisfying my curiosity, I'm happy with the practice, I really enjoy moving in those funny ways, I'm having great time! The teacher is really good people as well. I like her, her classes and her trips (she has a major trip on Jung I find very interesting :) I love rich, interesting people!).

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"Don't bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself." - W. Faulkner

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Heya! I tried to read most of this topic but it's getting kinda big :)

 

I recently started doing yoga. I'm doing the 30 days challenge of  DoYouYoga, but to be honest those workouts seem far too short and different from what I thought yoga would be. However I tried two of Yogi Nora's workouts and they were amazing! Pity is... she only has those 2 big ones for beginners. I check the other one but I can't even do a proper headstand without a wall, and I'm definitely far from a split yet.

 

What type of yoga is more to improve strength and flexibility? Do you know any other instructor like Yogi Nora? I still have some videos from Tara Stiles, Sadie and Adrienne to try out, but Nora is just awesome. She's super strong and her workouts are powerful and intense. I loved that.

I obviously would prefer free on youtube, but later on I don't mind investing on some DVDs as well.

 

I never thought I'd try yoga, as much as even like it! My back is a bit sore though, as my shoulders. Probably went a bit over what I should. But I really enjoyed the feeling.

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Nadoriel

 

NODDY'S GRINDING LOG

NODDY'S ENTERS THE HISTORIC RUINS (challenge)

 

Race: Half Demon | Class: Adventurer | Character sheet

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DeviantArt

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Thanks for the feedback.  I believe I’ve figured out the problem.  I did the transitions in front of a mirror at the gym.  Turns out I’m making two mistakes: one, my position in Downward Dog is too wide.  I’ve been focusing on the hamstring stretch and pushing with the shoulders, and not enough on the hip hinge.  Two, when I move my left leg forward, I swing it around wide rather than coming straight through.  This throws my hip and spine alignment off, but it allows for that long, stable lunge stance.  When I move my right leg forward, I go straight through.  This makes for a shorter stance while moving up into Warrior.  If I bring my hands and feet a little closer together in Downward Dog and focus on the mechanics, it works a lot better.

 

For what it’s worth, I’ve been doing vinyasa podcast classes from the Yoga To The People website.  I like the pace and the challenging poses, but it may be a little too advanced for me.  I’ve had a couple of group classes here and there and gotten zero correction from the teachers, so I figured I was doing OK. Time to slow down a little bit, methinks.  More focus on correct mechanics, and less on keeping up with the class and ‘feeling the burn’.

 

Thanks again!

Good for you! That's GREAT! I too went through the same predicament- it was not until my teacher training that I was informed of my misalignment. None of the teachers I was practicing with in the past ever confronted me about it, and obviously online yoga routines disable you from forming any sort of physical connection with the instructors who post them. That's not to discredit them, but that I think as teachers we have a responsibility to ensure that our students, including ourselves, practice safely, to instill the benefits of asana. If we did not, students can devastatingly injure themselves either for the short term or long term; certain injuries come up after years of poor practice, often from overstretching joints that needn't be in the first place. 

 And I agree, slowing down would greatly help. It doesn't mean you are 'weak', poorly skilled, or back to a beginner's level, it means you are number one honoring your body and two going back to perfect those positions. When you slow down, you have more time to really 'feel' a pose, to understand it, and dig a little deeper, both internally and externally. A warrior 2 is often neglected in a typical vinyasa flow based class- you just go into, strike a cool (often poorly aligned) pose worthy of Yoga Journal Magazine, and proceed quickly into the next pose. However, when you slow down and gather your strength in this pose, you really learn how to activate your muscles. You will feel your thighs, your heels, your shoulders after staying in it for almost a minute. It definitely becomes a form of bodyweight training if slowed down. You will definitely 'feel the burn'.

So I compliment you on your attention to yourself and your body in this case!

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Hey, I just wanted to let you know I finally found a class on a time I can attend! (Lunch hour.) It's an "integral" practice, which means a bit of everything, not much of anything :) but I really think it's a good thing at this point. I was curious! I'm satisfying my curiosity, I'm happy with the practice, I really enjoy moving in those funny ways, I'm having great time! The teacher is really good people as well. I like her, her classes and her trips (she has a major trip on Jung I find very interesting :) I love rich, interesting people!).

*Clapping- no seriously, I clapped whilst reading this, you awesome yogi you!* 

 

You have found YOUR yoga! 

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