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Minimalism, and the minimalist lifestyle


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On 2/6/2017 at 10:26 AM, Raincloak said:

I have a hamper for dirty clothes, and baskets and a dresser for clean ones.  But what does one do with clothes you've worn once or twice, but that aren't ready for the wash?  Like jeans?

 

I hang everything back up to let them air.  I get a lot longer wear out of them that way.  If you fold them and stick them in a drawer, they'll start to stink.

 

Rather than thinking of your clothes as "clean" and "dirty," think of them as, "need to be washed" and "need to be worn."  If you aren't going to wash them before wearing them again, put them back into circulation.  If you are going to wash them first, put them in the laundry hamper.

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On 1/25/2017 at 6:01 PM, TMedina said:

Raincloak had an excellent suggestion about the path of least resistance - discard things on the sly.

 

This approach works if you're getting rid of your own things, but be aware that it may cause your mother to be suspicious of  you if she sees you throwing out things, even if they're yours.  If she really is hoarding to the point where three rooms are completely unusable, it sounds like she's already into clinical hoarding habits.

 

If you can encourage your mother to think of ways she would like to use those rooms, rather than just storage, then it may motivate her to let you help empty them.  But she might see those rooms a being used for the purpose she wants - namely for storage.

 

I recommend that, if she's encroaching on your room, set a really firm rule that she's not allowed to bring anything into your room.  She may look at your tidy room and thing you're not using it well because you're not storing stuff in it.  I would suggest reading a book called Boundaries if that sort of thing is happening.

 

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On 1/29/2017 at 8:24 AM, DyDy said:

I have found to own less and less to be so much freeing!

 

I agree!  I moved overseas twice (once to Japan and once back) and had to get rid of SO MUCH to move back to the US.  I just didn't have a way to ship stuff back easily, so I curbed a lot of it.  After that, I started keeping less and less.  I can fit all my clothes in a medium-sized suitcase.  Besides those, the cat, and a couple big pieces of art, the only other thing I would need is my husband! :D 

 

That doesn't mean I don't still have a closet full of hobby stuff that never got off the ground...

 

On 1/31/2017 at 9:04 PM, Trixie Falsae said:

I don't want to get rid of it and jinx myself into having another baby

 

Have you looked into something like Essure?  

 

On 2/1/2017 at 1:12 AM, Raincloak said:

 

I feel kind of stupid citing Marie Kondo over and over

 

 

Never feel stupid for quoting a genius. :D I didn't see your comment before or I wouldn't have quoted the same thing!

 

On 2/5/2017 at 11:10 PM, Raincloak said:

I should probably just ditch half the clothes and get used to putting away the remainder

 

Next time you go to do laundry, you could just get rid of the half that are still hanging in the closet.  Those are going to be the clothes you don't wear on a regular basis.  It's super-effective! :D  

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On 2/5/2017 at 11:10 PM, Raincloak said:

Following an incident with some truly yucky trash, I'm trying to develop a habit of taking out the garbage/recycling whenever I go out and there's a full bag.  It's kind of a pain because the dumpsters are down three flights of stairs and in the opposite direction from my car (actually there's a gate by the dumpsters that leads to the street, but the $^&@ capitalist overlords locked it so passersby couldn't use our dumpsters, and now nobody can use the gate either.)   But it's worth extra effort to keep the trash in the kitchen from getting too disgusting.

I don't know what your habits are or how often you take it out now. But I have a system where I do dishes Wednesday and Sunday nights (regardless of how full it is) and then empty Thursday/Monday mornings and take the trash out (again regardless of how full it is). It helps keep the "I don't wannas" at bay because now it's just something I do on these days, like going to work or taking a shower.

 

On 2/6/2017 at 10:26 AM, Raincloak said:

I have a hamper for dirty clothes, and baskets and a dresser for clean ones.  But what does one do with clothes you've worn once or twice, but that aren't ready for the wash?  Like jeans?

This is a problem I have too. These clothes usually end up on a pile on the guest bed (by my closet) and then get put away back in the closet when I do the wash and put clean clothes away.

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I need to try making dish day a ritualized, systematic event.  It's too easy for me to skip days and end up with a sink that escaped from Jumanji. 

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Those of you with Netflix, there is a documentary on Minimalism, entitled appropriately, "Minimalism: a documentary about the important things" - I haven't watched it yet, but apparently it sparked some interest on the topic on another forum I frequent, so I thought I'd mention it here as well.

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6 hours ago, TMedina said:

Those of you with Netflix, there is a documentary on Minimalism, entitled appropriately, "Minimalism: a documentary about the important things" - I haven't watched it yet, but apparently it sparked some interest on the topic on another forum I frequent, so I thought I'd mention it here as well.

I will have to watch. I have been on a documentary kick lately. I either don't watch any TV or watch documentaries frequently.

 

On 3/1/2017 at 6:44 AM, Lydiechan said:

 

Have you looked into something like Essure? 

 

I'm awaiting a hysterectomy so I'm not going to something drastic and expensive in the few months I have left. I've was told I couldn't get pregnant again after the third hobbit, but I've had two more since then so unexpected pregnancy is a major paranoia for me. I actually went ahead and got rid of the bassinet. Goodwill surprisingly wouldn't take it, so I dropped it off at the charity shop I originally purchased it from.

 

I do dishes nightly, but there are a lot of us. I like having daily tasks, though. Its like a mini check list. Dishes done? Floor swept? Then its ok to put off folding the last load of laundry until tomorrow. I've been much happier since letting go of my perfectionism and learning to accept Good Enough.

 

I've been purging excess from the house again. Its been great. We picked up a vintage dining set with 6 chairs for a great deal. The old table was a bit snug for all of us and all of the chairs were broken. The hobbits were sitting on stools they out grew. I finally got rid of all the broken chairs and the old table went into the boys room for their legos, with the understanding that legos now belong on the table, in the lego bucket or in the trash. Haven't stepped on a lego since. I

 

Decluttering my room is still a hassle, but I think I finally have a solution. The bigger dining table meant that the two 9-cube bookshelves needed to go back into my room, which already felt like a storage space. Our bedroom is a converted one car garage and too much space meant too much stuff. I used the bookshelves  to divide the room in half. One half is the bed and dressers and the other half is the bookshelf/sewing area/board game rack/DVD cabinet. At least this way I feel like I have a dedicated sleeping space and that the rest of the stuff finally has a place and isn't just shoved in a corner.

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On ‎3‎/‎3‎/‎2017 at 0:07 PM, TMedina said:

I need to try making dish day a ritualized, systematic event.  It's too easy for me to skip days and end up with a sink that escaped from Jumanji. 

 

This is every day for me! I get my kitchen sink cleaned, after dinner..... Jumanji

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On 3/3/2017 at 11:07 AM, TMedina said:

I need to try making dish day a ritualized, systematic event.  It's too easy for me to skip days and end up with a sink that escaped from Jumanji. 

 

Here is what dishes and kitchen cleaning looks like for me:

1. Empty Dishwasher (I usually do this first thing in the morning, but do it here if it isn't done)

2. Put away pantry and food items still on the counters.

3. Pack leftovers and put in fridge.

4. Clear table. Hand wash items go by sink, dishwasher items in dishwasher.

5. Start filling sink with hot, soapy water. You can add dish soap at the end, but I like bubbles so I put it in while the sink is filling.

6. Start at one end of kitchen and move to the other; hand wash items by sink, dishwasher items in dishwasher.

7. Use a clean rag and wipe down counters, stove, and table (and microwave if needed). I don't bother with the counter under the dirty dishes.

8. Hand wash dishes, dry and put away.

9. Wipe down counter where dirty dishes were.

10. Empty sink, rinse and dry. It looks nicer and gives a sense of being done.

11. Put dish detergent in dishwasher and set on delayed start. I like it to go off while I am asleep.

12. Sweep floor.

 

This only takes me about 10-20 minutes because it is so routine for me. I'm also teaching the hobbits to clear the table and load the dishwasher so its making it easier on me. I usually wind up skipping Sunday night because I am so tired from work and I spend Monday mornings catching up, so I understand the Jumanji kitchen.

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On 3/3/2017 at 6:06 PM, Trixie Falsae said:

I'm awaiting a hysterectomy so I'm not going to something drastic and expensive in the few months I have left.

 

That's logical.  Essure was relatively inexpensive, but if you have other stuff going on then it may not be an option.  It worked great as an elective procedure for me.

 

On 3/3/2017 at 6:06 PM, Trixie Falsae said:

Decluttering my room is still a hassle, but I think I finally have a solution.

 

If you haven't read it yet, I do recommend The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up.  There are some great posts by fans that talk about getting your kids to KonMari their rooms.  I particularly like this one, because she has before and after pictures and is realistic about expectations for her "Hobbits." :D http://thespiritedthrifter.com/konmari-for-kids-part-one/

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Went to estate sale and splurged on a lovely wood framed standing mirror for my bedroom.  It wasn't cheap (by my very restrictive standards), but I have wanted one for years and I knew I'd regret not buying it.

 

When I got it home I realized it's slightly out of scale with the room (its former owner had a much larger house), but if I take some clutter out of the room it'll be just right.  Also now I can remove the cheap hanging mirror I had propped against the wall on a stepstool to serve as my daily fashion aide. 

 

I think replacing crappy things with nice things counts as minimalism, up to a point. You're not gonna catch me going around with a $500 purse any time soon, but for me, a few bits of well made furniture is so much better than a series of plastic crappy things.  (Now if only I could get the hang of this "fewer nicer things" habit with clothes, but one grown up step at a time..)

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On 3/11/2017 at 3:58 PM, Raincloak said:

I think replacing crappy things with nice things counts as minimalism, up to a point.

 

Absolutely.  Apartment Therapy has done articles on throwawayism and heirloom pieces that have been very inspiring to me.

 

On 3/11/2017 at 3:58 PM, Raincloak said:

I knew I'd regret not buying it.

 

That has become my litmus test, too.  I used to just collect art every time I saw it, but the question, "Will I regret it if I don't buy it?" is much easier to answer than, "Will I regret it if I do buy it?"

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It was a four day sale and I hate spending money, so I actually left it there and thought it over.  I came up wth a number that represented the maximum I was willing to pay for it (the mirror was not tagged).  Went back two days later to see if it was still there.  It was, and I still wanted it, and the price quoted was within my range.  So, I think it was meant to be.

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Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future.

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Half-marathon: 3:02
It is pitch dark. You are likely to be eaten by a grue.

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2 minutes ago, DyDy said:

Anyone willing to give me some motivation or a good kick in the butt?

 

Google KonMari Closet.  Or "tidy space."  I also have a Houzz board on organized spaces.

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(Already!?) Level 3 Ranger / Epic Declutterer / Prolific Writer

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"Your life does not get better by chance, it gets better by change."  - Jim Rohn

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From time to time, I wonder if I'm drifting from the core concept, but I believe it all loops together in a glorified Gordian knot.

 

I found this article entitled "The Disease of More" to be very interesting, and provided some insights into what we do and why we do it.  Well, some of us at least:

 

https://markmanson.net/disease-of-more

 

EtA: along the same vein, this article as well: http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-29295/how-i-went-from-being-a-hoarder-to-a-minimalist.html

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On 3/18/2017 at 10:57 AM, TMedina said:

From time to time, I wonder if I'm drifting from the core concept, but I believe it all loops together in a glorified Gordian knot.

 

I found this article entitled "The Disease of More" to be very interesting, and provided some insights into what we do and why we do it.  Well, some of us at least:

 

https://markmanson.net/disease-of-more

 

EtA: along the same vein, this article as well: http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-29295/how-i-went-from-being-a-hoarder-to-a-minimalist.html

Oh man... in that second article:

 

Quote

So that year, I made a deal with myself: I promised to forgive myself for the inevitable "mistakes" that were bound to crop up. I tried to remember that, in life, it's rare to make decisions that are clearly "right" or "wrong" and to remind myself that there won't be anyone waiting around with a red pencil to give me a letter grade on how I did at the end.

yepppp. Needed to read that.

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Doing financial paperwork and practicing deep breaths.  In my long neglected box o'docs, I discovered the receipts for my initial outfitting when I rented my first solo apartment in 2012.  I spent over $200 (at Wal-Mart ffs, couldn't get any cheaper) on things like basic cooking tools, shower curtain, dish rack, plastic trash bin, etc.  And then another $140 on basic groceries to stock my new kitchen.  That was a lot of money to me then.  Hell, it still is, though with inflation it'd no doubt be a lot higher now.

 

 I probably kept the receipts for sentimental reasons, but today I threw them away.  I'm all grown up (and still own the same bath mat, trashcan and shower curtain - it's about time to upgrade), but I don't think the receipt is likely to do me much good in the future, except as a reminder of how much it really costs to set up a home, which was a marvel to me then and still is now.

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Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future.

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It is pitch dark. You are likely to be eaten by a grue.

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There is an overwhelming sense of nostalgia when you go back through old papers and suddenly get dragged down memory lane. :D

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