• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

GhostGamba

Eating a lot but calories still too low

Recommended Posts

That's why I said "It needed three college wrestlers to die in a little over a month to change the rules in that sport", using it as an example of what kind of extreme things need to happen to take the issue seriously enough to warrant quick change, just like it took Eddie Guerrero and Chris Benoit, two giant wrestling stars to die both in heartbreaking, extreme manner, to change certain things forever (chair headshots, concussion awareness/prevention, somewhat real, but still pretty laughable drug testing). That is why I closed with "practices like this that have become traditions just take either that or a long time to change.", referring to weight-cutting the day before in other sports and all the methods and dangers that accompany it.

 

Could you please educate me on how these deaths changed the rules of that sport forever? And also on who says that cutting is an issue in the UFC/Pro Boxing?

 

Cutting to low body fat is hilariously misunderstood, with millions of opinions.

The biggest issue will always be fighting against your bodies' tendency to protect itself, both physically and psychologically.

IMHO short hard crash diets are the best way get real lean. And there is data that supports this. It is the best workaround to the bodies' tendencies; get what you can before it fights back and get out.

 

I'd have to go with this. It seems to be the case with every person I have worked with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your frame of reference here is making a fairly nonsensical jump (fat pig bulking followed by too long crash dieting). I advocate moderate length, rather small surplus bulking (~3 mo) followed by a 2 week hard as you can cut crash diet, followed with a return to bulking. With this tactic you can keep BF% in a very tight window (~2% variance) while slowly getting leaner over time, and maximizing the number of bulking days per year without corresponding fat gain.

 

When you do the cut portion of this, do you aim to eat a certain number of calories each day or do you just eat enough to make it through each day without feeling totally wiped out? Not sure if that is clear but pretty much do you say "I'm going to eat X calories per day for two weeks" or do you say "I'll just eat enough to fuel myself no matter how many calories that is"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When you do the cut portion of this, do you aim to eat a certain number of calories each day or do you just eat enough to make it through each day without feeling totally wiped out? Not sure if that is clear but pretty much do you say "I'm going to eat X calories per day for two weeks" or do you say "I'll just eat enough to fuel myself no matter how many calories that is"?

I just eat a basic skeleton diet. The difference between bulking and cutting for me is in snacks and after dinner ice cream; my baseline diet is fine for cutting.

I also dramatically increase the amount of easy cardio I do.

Generally when I cut, I try to maintain a 1000-1700 cal deficit per day (trying to average ~1500/day), maintaining that for 2 weeks, with a proper refeed at the 1 week point. I can usually drop about 5 lbs of fat in that 2 weeks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could you please educate me on how these deaths changed the rules of that sport forever? And also on who says that cutting is an issue in the UFC/Pro Boxing?

 

 

I'd have to go with this. It seems to be the case with every person I have worked with.

This article should have you covered. In short, in 1997, 3 wrestlers died within 33 days trying to cut weight. The same season, the committee applied several drastic rule changes, including moving weigh-ins from the day before to 1-2h before competition, banning several measures and techniques from sweatsuits to diuretics or locking thermostats as well as mandatory hydration assessments in order to be allowed to compete. There's more though, this really was a groundbreaking change to the sport and one, as stated, only possible by having something as extreme as 3 deaths in a month happening.

As far as who says that it's a problem, I'd say it's pretty universal. Dave Meltzer wrote a good piece on it a while back, here's another example from BR and really, every time something happens (like Barao knocking himself out cutting weight, Hendricks almost missing weight for his title fight, people looking horrible after a bad cut, people forfeiting part of their purse for not making weight etc. etc.) you can read about it, most fighters, when asked, especially leading up to a fight, will tell you how much it sucks and Joe Rogan has talked about it numerous times, be it during

or on some of his hundreds of podcasts. I'm not that much into boxing so I wouldn't know exactly but unless methods are vastly different, I'd expect things to be just the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting read. So 3 deaths in 1997 and Wrestlers are still cutting weight to this day? Why is that? And why is it that when college wrestlers miss weight they blame the sport, but when professional fighters do people seem to largely blame it on laziness? (Seems like more of that Think Of The Children bullshit to me.)

 

I still don't see it as an issue to them, just another one of those accepted work-related hazards. They are professionals after all, and are probably expected to know how to do it properly (which would probably be the best form of damage control). Athletes like to push their limits and are free to do so, and Barao collapsing in the shower is not going to stop weight cutting, much like dos Santos getting rhabdomyolysis isn't going to stop training camps. Fighters all say it is miserable, and that is probably why they do it. Society seems to put such a high premium on hard work and a person not starving or sweating for a weigh-in has a tendency to feel like he's not working as hard as the other guy. It fits very well with the montage culture, because you can drop a lot of weight in a week while skill training takes years. There are many simple solutions to eliminate it. The UFC just doesn't see it as a big enough problem to pay the price associated with implementing those measures. They've done it before after all. It would be safe to assume that there was no weight cutting involved before UFC 12, or in the PRIDE Grand Prix.

 

Personally as a martial artist, I'm not a big advocate of weight cutting. I think it makes you more of an athlete rather than an actual fighter. (See also: training camps, peaking, warm-up) I have always placed a much higher premium on skill. But I utilize it nonetheless as I happen to be pretty proficient at it, because why not? Being outweighed blows.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.