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Hey, anyone here do any geocaching? I started dabbling in it in 2013, but it turned into full-blown obsession 10 months ago. I'm curious to know if any fellow Rebels are also cachers.

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Yep, hubby and I are also obsessed with caching. Our February has been very mild, so we have taken advantage of it and spent many nice weekend caching. I know of at least two other cachers on the boards: Obax,Chris-Tien Jinn. Seems like hubby and I aren't the best at it, we tend to wander around and get lost a lot. :redface-new: But, hey, that makes for more exercise, right.

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My friends and I were big into it back in 2008. Got out of it for awhile, but I want to get back into it, especially since smartphones make it that much easier. I am looking forward to my son being old enough to enjoy the hunt.

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Yay, more cachers! You definitely should get back into the game, wovercast. Geocaching has grown a lot since 2008. I use a smartphone for caching myself, specifically a free app called c:geo. I can't recommend it enough. I use it in combination with downloaded offline maps, and save a lot of data and battery life on my phone that way.

 

DH and I cache together, and some days we end up wandering around a lot, too, Elastigirl, more often than not while looking for the stupidly easy ones.  :rolleyes-new: Surprisingly, the winter hasn't slowed us down as much as I thought it would have. We haven't gone out in the single-digit temps, but we're still steadily raising our find count. Of course, I've started getting in the habit of dressing in layers more and just bought a proper pair of outdoor boots, so that helps.

 

I figured out, too, that the higher-terrain caches get me doing things like climbing trees or up slopes, so yay exercise!

 

We just went this afternoon to get a 5-difficulty, 4.5-terrain cache in our area. Turns out that even with ankle-deep snow, this was the perfect time to find it, because the thing was right smack-dab in the middle of a forest, no paths, on the bank of a creek. It would have been a beast of a thing in spring or summer. It still was a 45-minute hike through the snow, though. But a really pretty hike!

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Yeap  Me too - I'm grinningcollie on geocaching.com!!!!

 

In the winter, I'm doing more of Ingress - an augmented reality capture the flag game - which you can do much easier from car or indoors. 

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Yeap  Me too - I'm grinningcollie on geocaching.com!!!!

 

In the winter, I'm doing more of Ingress - an augmented reality capture the flag game - which you can do much easier from car or indoors. 

Never heard of Ingress *Google it* crap, there goes my free time :P

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I'm boxen-hunters. Feel free to send me a friend request!

 

I'm seriously considering doing Ingress, too. I've heard about it, and even have an invite from a friend of mine sitting in my email inbox. Question for you, though. I know you have to have the GPS turned on all the time to play. Do you have to have the data turned on the entire time as well, or can you download the necessary info and just use the GPS when playing?

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Yay, more cachers! You definitely should get back into the game, wovercast. Geocaching has grown a lot since 2008. I use a smartphone for caching myself, specifically a free app called c:geo. I can't recommend it enough. I use it in combination with downloaded offline maps, and save a lot of data and battery life on my phone that way.

 

DH and I cache together, and some days we end up wandering around a lot, too, Elastigirl, more often than not while looking for the stupidly easy ones.  :rolleyes-new: Surprisingly, the winter hasn't slowed us down as much as I thought it would have. We haven't gone out in the single-digit temps, but we're still steadily raising our find count. Of course, I've started getting in the habit of dressing in layers more and just bought a proper pair of outdoor boots, so that helps.

 

I figured out, too, that the higher-terrain caches get me doing things like climbing trees or up slopes, so yay exercise!

 

We just went this afternoon to get a 5-difficulty, 4.5-terrain cache in our area. Turns out that even with ankle-deep snow, this was the perfect time to find it, because the thing was right smack-dab in the middle of a forest, no paths, on the bank of a creek. It would have been a beast of a thing in spring or summer. It still was a 45-minute hike through the snow, though. But a really pretty hike!

Yes we have the skill of making an easy one  difficult. ;) You're adventurous hiking in the snow. We seldom get snow here. We get mud. We forgot to wear our hiking shoes last time and just wore our regular tennies. Nothing like mud oozing up through your socks. :rapture: But we had a great view too, and it was a gorgeous day.

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I'm as surprised as anyone else that we've been doing so much winter caching as we have been. I really thought that I would hate the idea of it. I guess I'm hardier than I thought.

 

Honestly, I think thick mud would deter me more than snow, so you've got one over me there!

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I'm as surprised as anyone else that we've been doing so much winter caching as we have been. I really thought that I would hate the idea of it. I guess I'm hardier than I thought.

 

Honestly, I think thick mud would deter me more than snow, so you've got one over me there!

With our hiking shoes  mud usually isn't a problem. Mine are waterproof, because caching here usually means at least a few puddles.

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That's a good point. I just got a good pair of hiking shoes (okay, technically combat boots) last week, so the mud will no doubt be less of a problem. I still need to waterproof them, though. It's on my to-do list.

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I cache! It has been about a year since I have been on the hunt, but I want to get back into it when it warms up a bit. What GPS does everyone use? I had a Garmin but I don't know where it went. Last I saw, my 3-year-old was walking around pretending it was a phone...

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I actually use my smartphone for caching, svilardo. I have an app that works very nicely with the phone's GPS.

 

Barefoot, if you like hiking, walking, and scavenger hunts, I think you'd love geocaching! Assuming you have a smartphone, probably the best way for you to get started is to do what I do and use your phone. Here's the first steps to getting started:

  1. Create a free Basic account at geocaching.com.
  2. Download a geocaching app onto your phone. Geocaching Intro is a free "lite" version of the official paid Geocaching app, and Intro is tailored towards people just starting the game.
  3. Read this webpage. It'll answer a lot of questions about the basics of geocaching and has a nice how-to video.
  4. Sign into your new Geocaching.com account on your chosen phone app.
  5. Browse the cache listings, and pick one that you want to find.
  6. Go find the cache!
  7. When you find the cache, sign the paper logbook inside the cache.
  8. Write a log on on the cache's online listing.

And that is how to get started caching.

 

A few tips for you as well:

  • All caches are rated by a 5-star system for difficulty level, 1 being easiest, and 5 hardest. Just starting out, you might want to stick to 1-2 star difficulty caches. If you think you're good at finding very well-hidden things, you can try for higher difficulties, but don't say I didn't warn you!
  • All caches also are rated for terrain by the same 5-star system. 1 star generally means pavement. 1.5-2 stars are usually grassy areas or gentle slopes. 3 stars are not-so-gentle slopes, or may involve wading or overgrown weeds. 4-5 stars means you have to climb rocky cliffs or trees, or you may have to swim!
  • If you don't find a cache at first, don't be discouraged! Sometimes even low-difficulty caches can be elusive. Go to the cache's listing, and log it as "did not find." Then go back later and try again.
  • All caches have descriptions in their listings. Always read the description before you go find a cache, because it will contain vital information and/or hints about the cache.
  • When you write your log online, tell a story about your experience with the cache. Too many people write only "TFTC" (aka Thanks For The Cache) in their logs, but the people who hide the caches want to hear you talk about it! It doesn't have to be an essay, but a few sentences are always appreciated.

That's about all I'll post, so that I don't flood you with information. Feel free to ask any other questions! Hope this helps!

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I actually use my smartphone for caching, svilardo. I have an app that works very nicely with the phone's GPS.

 

Barefoot, if you like hiking, walking, and scavenger hunts, I think you'd love geocaching! Assuming you have a smartphone, probably the best way for you to get started is to do what I do and use your phone. Here's the first steps to getting started:

  1. Create a free Basic account at geocaching.com.
  2. Download a geocaching app onto your phone. Geocaching Intro is a free "lite" version of the official paid Geocaching app, and Intro is tailored towards people just starting the game.
  3. Read this webpage. It'll answer a lot of questions about the basics of geocaching and has a nice how-to video.
  4. Sign into your new Geocaching.com account on your chosen phone app.
  5. Browse the cache listings, and pick one that you want to find.
  6. Go find the cache!
  7. When you find the cache, sign the paper logbook inside the cache.
  8. Write a log on on the cache's online listing.

And that is how to get started caching.

 

A few tips for you as well:

  • All caches are rated by a 5-star system for difficulty level, 1 being easiest, and 5 hardest. Just starting out, you might want to stick to 1-2 star difficulty caches. If you think you're good at finding very well-hidden things, you can try for higher difficulties, but don't say I didn't warn you!
  • All caches also are rated for terrain by the same 5-star system. 1 star generally means pavement. 1.5-2 stars are usually grassy areas or gentle slopes. 3 stars are not-so-gentle slopes, or may involve wading or overgrown weeds. 4-5 stars means you have to climb rocky cliffs or trees, or you may have to swim!
  • If you don't find a cache at first, don't be discouraged! Sometimes even low-difficulty caches can be elusive. Go to the cache's listing, and log it as "did not find." Then go back later and try again.
  • All caches have descriptions in their listings. Always read the description before you go find a cache, because it will contain vital information and/or hints about the cache.
  • When you write your log online, tell a story about your experience with the cache. Too many people write only "TFTC" (aka Thanks For The Cache) in their logs, but the people who hide the caches want to hear you talk about it! It doesn't have to be an essay, but a few sentences are always appreciated.

That's about all I'll post, so that I don't flood you with information. Feel free to ask any other questions! Hope this helps!

Wow, thanks for the detailed response! I've downloaded the app, etc and have located several caches nearby..I think I've found a new passtime! Thanks heaps. I'll post an update when I find my first one :)

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Muahahaha! another one has joined us! Soon, we shall be unstoppable, and all shall--ummm...I mean...that's great, Barefoot! Yeah...uh, glad I could introduce you to a new hobby! ;)

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I'm boxen-hunters. Feel free to send me a friend request!

 

I'm seriously considering doing Ingress, too. I've heard about it, and even have an invite from a friend of mine sitting in my email inbox. Question for you, though. I know you have to have the GPS turned on all the time to play. Do you have to have the data turned on the entire time as well, or can you download the necessary info and just use the GPS when playing?

 

I think you can just turn on the GPS when you are playing and leave it off the rest of the time.  I tend to turn off wi-fi and Bluetooth and location services when I'm not using them because my battery is dying.   :indecisiveness:

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Ah, yes, the Boy Scouts. Don't they have a merit badge for geocaching? Some of the caches around here are Eagle Scout projects, and one we found a couple weeks ago was a Girl Scout silver award project. I also know some former and current Scout volunteers who are heavily involved with caching around here. The connection between Scouts and caching is really interesting!

 

What have you done, Cell? We just did our third geocache... Didn't find this one...think the muggles got there first. Think I might have to make one myself next :)

 

Funny you should ask, because we just came back yesterday from a little road trip adventure with lots of caching involved. I was a bridesmaid in a friend's wedding down in Georgia, so we drove from our home state of Ohio to Georgia, and cached all along the way.

 

We passed through West Virginia and both Carolinas on the way down, and then took a slightly longer route back up through South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and Kentucky. We found 22 caches (mostly at rest stops) over 5 days in all 7 states, including 3 Earthcaches. We also picked up 2 Travel Bugs and brought them home with us.

 

DH even found a cache without any coordinates in Virginia! We stopped at a scenic outlook in the mountains, but naturally had no data service, so we couldn't check for nearby caches. But we knew there had to be one there, and DH spotted it tucked under the walkway. I had to look up the location yesterday when we got home to find out the name of the cache. That man has crazy good observational skills!

 

So last week was crazy, but we had an absolute blast. I haven't been farther south than upper Kentucky since 2005, and the whole trip was a much-needed vacation.

 

The only downside is that now I have to catch up on writing all these online logs!

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Sounds like a fun trip!! 

 

I've been enjoying Ingress too much lately to do much caching, but now that the snow is gone, it's time to whip out the GPS!!

 

Woohoo! I'm still thinking about getting into Ingress, but I feel like I might have your problem in reverse if I try. ;)

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Woohoo! I'm still thinking about getting into Ingress, but I feel like I might have your problem in reverse if I try. ;)

 

I figure that ANYTHING that gets me out for a walk is a good thing.  But better yet is one that gets hubby out for a walk!!!

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I've done some caching in the past. Getting back into it. I was at a training class this week that let out early so I had the option of sitting im the hotel room or exploring some parks. While at the park, I fired up c:geo and found a cache. My battery was low so I didn't get any others but it was a blast.

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