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Bearman

New Martial Art

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I am looking at starting a new martial art in the next couple months after my black belt test in ITF TKD. Going for something completely different. I'm looking at 3 different ones. 

 

Aikido

FMA

Combat Sambo

 

I'm leaning towards the Sambo, especially since they offer Aiki-jujutsu and Capoeira as well.  

 

The FMA guys do the Counterpoint Tactical System which sounds cool, but the class/testing structure seemed strange to me. Class is once a week personal training for up to 4 people, which is cool, but advancement is only possible when the main instructor is in the state, and not always around my area. I would hate to not learn new techniques for a while just because I couldn't drive a couple hundred miles to test. This might be normal, I have no idea.   

 

As for Aikido, I have had some trouble contacting them, but I have been interested in Aikido since I first watched Steven Seagal lol 

 

My question is, does anyone have any experience or suggestions about any of the 3? I plan to visit the Sambo and Aikido schools soon, and I'm sure that will influence my choice, but people who have trained in them will help greatly too.   

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I'm practicing FMA, but I haven't heard of that system. My classes are regular during Tuesdays and Thursdays. But the testing are usually bi annually or annually. The judges are also the main guros and the grandmaster (founder) of our system. You are also given your choice if you want to undergo testing or not.

Personally, I think you should try out all 3 arts. I started out with MT and boxing- I still practice but FMA stole my heart.

Good luck finding an art for you!

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I took a knife defense seminar with a FMA guy and it was amazing. I left with my forearms all kinds of bruised and swollen, my shoulders ached, and my ribs hurt from the knife attacks I missed...man what a great time. It sounds like a similar set up then, the only difference being that the instructor is just starting and unable to set up a formal "school" or anything. 

 

Thanks for the info.

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I definitely think Sambo would be a great addition. If you plan on continuing to practice tkd, I'm not sure. Sambo has a lot of killer leg locks and I wouldn't want you to not be able to kick, or stand, for that matter.

 

I've zero experience with aikido. FMA is always a great way to round out your ma training. It covers a great deal, but that testing thing sounds lame. I bet you could arrange to test up through video correspondence, though.

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I took a knife defense seminar with a FMA guy and it was amazing. I left with my forearms all kinds of bruised and swollen, my shoulders ached, and my ribs hurt from the knife attacks I missed...man what a great time. It sounds like a similar set up then, the only difference being that the instructor is just starting and unable to set up a formal "school" or anything. 

 

Thanks for the info.

 

 

That will DEFINITELY happen if you'll be training in FMA. Especially if you start sparring. I haven't sparred with live sticks, only with padded ones and without armor, and I still get bruises everywhere. FMA will really teach you how to hit without getting hit, and stuff like that. Anyway, do give the FMA school a try! :D

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I studied aikido for a while, under students of Steven Seagal.  You'll definitely learn how to take falls, put people in joint locks, and so forth, but it's not a perfect system by any means.  It's difficult to use in an enclosed space, and if you're dealing with an experienced grappler or boxer you'll be in big trouble.  There's also a pretty substantial amount of woo, depending on the school. 

 

Go with FMA or sambo.  Heck, capoeira is a blast, and it's a great workout. You'll develop amazing physical control and really strong kicks.

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I'm leaning towards the Sambo. I have been talking to a couple guys I train with in TKD and I think they will join me for some FMA once a month or so. The FMA is paid per class and is the same rate for 1 person as it is for 4 (which is strange to me but why not take advantage and split the cost) so once a month or so is very doable and it gives me training partners I already know. The Sambo club includes aiki-jujutsu which, I have read, is similar to aikido, and capoeira which is just awesome. The good part though, none of the schools have contracts or anything so if I don't like one, or if one just truly steals my heart, I can freely move on. Thanks for the help guys.

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The Sambo club includes aiki-jujutsu which, I have read, is similar to aikido, and capoeira which is just awesome.

Classic Aiki-jujutsu (not just Daito Ryu) differed by school. Daito Ryu was probably the most prolific. Judo and Akido rose from the teachings of one or more Ruys of Aki-Jujitsu. Sambo, Brazilian Jujitsu, Krav Maga, and almost every modern self-defense system out there can trace much of their catalog back to Aki-jujitsu.

It seems natural that a sambo club (a Russian off shoot of Judo) would work in Akijujitsu as they could blend off each other, most of the throws and locks are the same, just adding jujitsu-friendly strikes and joint attacks (not submissions).

In Aiki-jujutsu joint attacks are not submissions, they don't have to be held. For a "submission" you have to control the body, which is very difficult standing up. An Aikijujitsu a joint attack occurs like a striking (hit or miss, you move on, you don't hold it). This is why some people think Aiki-jujutsu doesn't work. Well very few boxers land all four strikes in a combo, that doesn't mean striking doesn't work.

Here's a pretty good explanation of the difference between Aiki-jujitsu and Aikido.

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