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The Shogun

The Monastery Kitchen

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I cooked!!! I cooked I cooked I COOKED! I cooked a thing that was a real thing that I fed to my roommates and they said it was GOOD! I COOKED.

 

Someone be proud of me!

 

~ Sol

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I cooked!!! I cooked I cooked I COOKED! I cooked a thing that was a real thing that I fed to my roommates and they said it was GOOD! I COOKED.

 

Someone be proud of me!

 

~ Sol

Yay!  What'd you make?

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Yay!  What'd you make?

 

I've actually cooked THREE TIMES! I cooked a homemade pizza, and then I cooked an omelette in the shape of the sun, and then I cooked SALMON! And I did all of them PRETTY DARN WELL! The girlfriend (test subject) was happy, anyway. :P

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I cooked!!! I cooked I cooked I COOKED! I cooked a thing that was a real thing that I fed to my roommates and they said it was GOOD! I COOKED.

 

Someone be proud of me!

 

~ Sol

 

b399e98cb0eb5d38a1a6bee537f8d067.gif

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On Mondays i'm at school all day, without access to a microwave or any way to heat up food. Does anyone have recipes for meals that don't need to be reheated and will last a few hours in a bag? Just curious.

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Pre-baked sweet potatoes and hard boiled eggs travel pretty decently for a few hours. Plus a cool sweet potato gives you all resistant starches.  Which I'm still not sold on, but eh, they exist.

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On Mondays i'm at school all day, without access to a microwave or any way to heat up food. Does anyone have recipes for meals that don't need to be reheated and will last a few hours in a bag? Just curious.

 

Bento lunches are designed this way.  Admittedly, they're mostly not hot just because people don't heat them, so it's just a question of getting used to the idea of cold cooked food, and then putting anything you like in them.  I think the rigid box helps when schlepping stuff in a bag all day, anything in my bag that long gets pretty beat-up, and they're packed pretty densely, which is a more space-efficient way to take a whole day's worth of food.

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Bento lunches are designed this way.  Admittedly, they're mostly not hot just because people don't heat them, so it's just a question of getting used to the idea of cold cooked food, and then putting anything you like in them.  I think the rigid box helps when schlepping stuff in a bag all day, anything in my bag that long gets pretty beat-up, and they're packed pretty densely, which is a more space-efficient way to take a whole day's worth of food.

 

Takes a bit of getting used to, but cold cooked foods work great (I even eat cold left over bacon) Salads are a great way to take foods with you too. I use a left over spice jar to store the dressing so it doesn't get soggy, and they'll keep most the day. 

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Pre-baked sweet potatoes and hard boiled eggs travel pretty decently for a few hours. Plus a cool sweet potato gives you all resistant starches.  Which I'm still not sold on, but eh, they exist.

 

Great idea! I'll have to pick up some sweet potato today and try that out.

 

Bento boxes look cool too.

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Bento boxes look cool too.

 

You can do 'em in regular tupperware, if you have that.  The general rule of thumb is get one that's 1mL for each calorie you want to take with you (600mL = 600 calories), and then pack it tight, so nothing can shift in transit.  It'll look like the container is too small, but it'll be packed solid with food, and it's a lot more than it looks like.  (Huge space savings in the bag, that's one of the reasons I like it.)  I think the traditional way is 3 parts rice, 2 parts vegetables, 1 part meat, but I usually do more Primal/paleo ones, personally.  You fill any holes where things might shift with, I dunno, grapes or tomatoes or cheese or anything that fills the gaps.  Hard-boiled eggs and sweet potatoes are valid bento foods.  People use silicone muffin liners to create dividers, if they need a section for something that doesn't play well with the other stuff, like they don't want rice to get on their grapes.

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You can do 'em in regular tupperware, if you have that.  The general rule of thumb is get one that's 1mL for each calorie you want to take with you (600mL = 600 calories), and then pack it tight, so nothing can shift in transit.  It'll look like the container is too small, but it'll be packed solid with food, and it's a lot more than it looks like.  (Huge space savings in the bag, that's one of the reasons I like it.)  I think the traditional way is 3 parts rice, 2 parts vegetables, 1 part meat, but I usually do more Primal/paleo ones, personally.  You fill any holes where things might shift with, I dunno, grapes or tomatoes or cheese or anything that fills the gaps.  Hard-boiled eggs and sweet potatoes are valid bento foods.  People use silicone muffin liners to create dividers, if they need a section for something that doesn't play well with the other stuff, like they don't want rice to get on their grapes.

 

I've got plenty of tupperware that I can try shoving food into. I end up mashing my sweet potato and egg together anyway, so if they mingle that's just fine.

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Quick & easy & Tasty

 

Salmon, green beans and green pesto with salt and pepper and the juice of a lemon. Wrapped in tinfoil and baked in the oven.

 

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I'm looking for a way to replace the tinfoil. Any ideas how?

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I'm looking for a way to replace the tinfoil. Any ideas how?

 

Parchment paper is the traditional way.  If you're looking for something reusable, a glass baking disk with an oven-safe glass lid would pretty much do the same job.

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I'm looking for a way to replace the tinfoil. Any ideas how?

 

I love cooking salmon in a cast iron pan (I'm sure it would work with any oven safe pan that can also go on the stove). then in the oven. I put some slices in the skin like can be seen in the link below, hot cast iron, skin side down with some oil, let it cook for a few mins on the stove, then transfer it into a really hot oven (like 400-450) Crispy salmon skin is like fish bacon... 

 

This is where the idea came from

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Pi Day entry: Kurnik = Russian chicken pie

 

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This recipe is a lot of work to make and totally worth it. My work is having a competition for pi day. I intend to win in the savory category. ;)

 

Kurnik - from A La Russe by Dara Goldstein

 

Crust:

3 cups flour

1/2 tsp salt

2 tsp baking powder

1.5 cups butter (3 sticks)

12 oz cream cheese

2 egg yolks

 

Warm the butter and cream cheese to room temperature. Sift the dry ingredients together. Beat the butter and cream cheese until fluffy. Use a stand mixer or a lot of elbow grease. Beat in the egg yolks. Stir in the dry ingredients until fully combined. Divide into two balls of dough, one bigger than the other (about a 60/40 split). Wrap each ball of dough in waxed paper and refrigerate at least 30 minutes.

 

Filling:

Part 1 - chicken

~2-4 pounds chicken.  This can be leg quarters, breasts or a small whole chicken. You are going to need chicken broth, so the easiest thing to do is boil it with the following:

1 bay leaf

a few peppercorns

1 tsp salt

a big carrot

a small onion, chopped coarsely

 

Boil the chicken until it is tender and easy to pull from the bones. Pour the stock into a bowl. Save the carrot for the veggie section below. Remove the meat from the bones and set aside. Save the bones for stock or discard. Chop up the meat in bite-sized pieces.

 

1 cup chicken broth

1.5 tsp dill

1/4 cup sour cream

1/4 tsp salt

 

Mix together and pour over the chopped chicken. Stir to coat all the pieces. Set aside.

 

Part 2 - Eggs

4 eggs - hard boil and chop coarsely

 

Part 3 - Rice

2 cups chicken stock

1 cup rice

1/4 tsp salt

 

Bring the chicken stock to a boil. Add the rice. Reduce heat to low and cover. Cook until all the liquid is absorbed. How long depends on the kind of rice you use. You can turn off the heat after 15 minutes and leave it if you don't want to keep an eye on it.

 

Part 4 - Veggies

onion - 1 large or 2-3 medium, chopped

1 tsp tarragon

mushrooms - 1 pound, washed and chopped

carrots - chop the large carrot from the chicken stock, or chop up a couple carrots if you started from already cooked chicken.

4 T butter

 

Saute the onion in 2T butter until translucent. I like it carmelized, but that takes longer. Add the tarragon. If using fresh carrots, add them next and cook until tender. Transfer the onions to a bowl. Add the other 2T butter to the pan and cook the mushrooms until just tender but not soggy. Mix with the onions and carrots.

 

Assembly:

Pre-heat the oven to 400ºF. Butter a 10 inch springform pan or a large casserole. This recipe will not fit in a standard pie pan.

Take the dough out of the fridge. If you made it the night before it will take a while to warm up. I heated it in the microwave on 10% power for a minute to speed up the process.

Roll out the larger ball of dough on a floured pastry cloth. It should be big enough to fit in your pan with about an inch of overlap on all sides. Put in the pan and ease the circle of dough to fit into a cylinder. Fill the pan with layers:

  • rice (1/3)
  • chicken (1/2)
  • eggs (1/2)
  • veggies (1/2)
  • rice (1/3)
  • chicken (1/2)
  • eggs (1/2)
  • veggies (1/2)
  • rice (1/3)

Roll out the smaller ball of dough into a circle big enough to cover the pan with a little bit hanging over all around. Put on top and crimp the layers of dough together. Save any extra bits of dough you trim off to make it fit. You'll want to bake the extra dough to eat separately.

 

Bake 20 minutes at 400ºF. Reduce the heat to 350ºF and bake 25 minutes more. If the ingredients were cold when you assembled the pie, bake an extra 10 minutes.

 

User tip: If you use a springform pan, put a sheet of foil under it before you put the pie in the oven. Otherwise you may find that your pan leaks butter that burns on the floor of the oven. Just sayin.

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Pi Day entry: Kurnik = Russian chicken pie

 

UaW6QzC.jpg?1

 

This recipe is a lot of work to make and totally worth it. My work is having a competition for pi day. I intend to win in the savory category. ;)

 

3907238-1029560989-tumbl.gif

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I followed this recipe and made three ratatoille quiche for my pen and paper group on monday. It's really easy. You just have to dice the zucchini, eggplant, bell pepper and onions. Than you roast them in a pan. I would put some backing paper in the forms first. It was really hard to clean them afterwards. Than you put the dough into the round forms. I used pizza dough. And than you add a mixture of eggs, cheese and sour creme.

 

I think it's a good recipe for people who don't like vegetables on their own.

 

 

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