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The Shogun

The Monastery Kitchen

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Today's supper: Rice cooker stewed rice and beans! 

 

This is a really nice recipe for batch cooking, especially if you have a rice cooker. If you don't, no worries - you can achieve the same effect by slowly stewing your rice and beans on a stove top, but it's higher maintenance and takes more water. 

 

Ingredients: 

2 rice cooker scoops (1.5 cups) long grain rice (brown rice ideally - I used basmati today because that's what I have on hand)

2 rice cooker scoops (1.5 cups) small dried pre-soaked beans (your choice of type - because I have them on hand, I went with a blend of white navy and adzuki beans)

16 ounces diced tomatoes

1 medium tomato, diced

2 cups low-sodium chicken stock (or veggie stock if you're vegetarian) - add a cup of water or more as needed if you're stewing on a stovetop. 

2-3 minced jalapenos (or more as you like if you really want to bring the heat) 

4 cloves minced garlic

juice of 1 lime - or 1 sliced lime if you have fresh 

1 tbsp dried cilantro - or a cup fresh. 

2 tbsp oil of choice. 


Pre-soak the beans the night before. Then dump it all in the rice cooke or your pot. Stir. Cook on "whole wheat" setting for your rice cooker for 60 minutes - or in your pot, simmer, stirring at least every 5 minutes, until the beans are cooked. If you don't cook dried beans often, they're done when the skin splits and peels off if you blow on them. I'd discourage using larger varieties of beans - pinto, kidney, etc - only because that will stretch out the cook time to several hours and turn the rice to mush. If you really want to - add the rice after the larger beans have been cooking for an hour or so. 

 

When you're done, you can add some spinach if you want some more greens to it, or just serve as is. 

 

Observant people will notice I basically took a restaurant style Mexican rice recipe, upped the veggie content and then added beans to make it a complete meal, then tweaked the water so it would work in a rice cooker. I never said I was original. :P 

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Now now. Sometimes originality is a crutch for people who don't know better. :D

 

I'm always impressed by the ways people find to dress up starches. I thought I'd done a Great Thing when I figured out adding coconut oil and turmeric to rice, but this looks really, really good.

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Thanks! 

 

Even folks I know who hate vegetables like this one. 

 

Note: if you like really strong flavors of a lot of heat you may want to double the lime, herbs and/or jalapenos. This recipe is the version I use when guests who aren't as fond of heat as me visit. If is still tasty, but I love very strong flavors so it's a bit pn the bland side for me as-written.

 

Then again, I sometimes cook with ghost peppers (not put in for flavor - I am talking 3 or 4 chopped and added to chili) so my palate is a bit skewed toward burn-normal-people's-mouth-off heat.

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On 9/25/2017 at 6:27 AM, chemgeek said:

 

 

Then again, I sometimes cook with ghost peppers (not put in for flavor - I am talking 3 or 4 chopped and added to chili) so my palate is a bit skewed toward burn-normal-people's-mouth-off heat.

 

Was watching... some food network show that i cant remember now. They cook with ghost peppers, but put it in whole, so apparently you get flavor without heat (as long as you dont break it open during cooking) 

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Yeah, that's how most people use them. They actually do have a nice flavor. :)

 

I floated in my thread posting the recipe to this and @Kishi seemed receptive, so. 

Pumpkin chicken coconut curry:

  • 1 chicken breast, sliced and 1 cup lentils or 3 chicken breasts, sliced. 
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 cloves galic, minced
  • 2 diced shallots (optional)
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 can coconut milk, or 3/4 cup coconut + 2 cups water, blended (you can choose to strain this if you like - I don't find it makes much of a difference)
  • 1 large can of pumpkin puree (or 2 cups home-made pumpkin puree - recipe here: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/22935/pumpkin-puree/ )
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • 3 tbsp curry paste (recipe here: http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/curry-paste/b224504f-9c77-4560-a187-dfb63f1bcb22 or you can use canned)
  • 3 cups green veggies (spinach makes a good choice - but I've used green beans, cabbage or even broccoli in a pinch) or 1.5 cups frozen
  • 1/2 head of cauliflower, minced
  • cinnamon, garam masala spice blend (recipe here:http://allrecipes.com/recipe/126089/garam-masala-spice-blend/ or you can buy it in a grocery store), and crushed red chili pepper to taste

In a frying pan, fry the onion, garlic and shallots (if used) in half the coconut oil until caramelized. Add to a soup pot. Add the other half of the coconut oil to the pan, and fry the chicken breast(s) until browned. Add as well to the pot. Add coconut milk (or coconut-water mixture), pumpkin puree, lentils if using, chicken stock and curry paste all to the pot and mix well. Simmer for about 15 minutes - then add veggies and spices, to taste. Simmer until veggies are cooked through and lentils are tender but not mushy, about another 5-15 minutes depending on type of lentils used. Serve over plain rice or noodles, or with a side of flatbread. Trust me, you don't need to do much for the rice or noodles - this curry is flavorful enough on its own! :) 

 

I got inspiration for this recipe from my sister - but compared to her version, I cut the coconut milk down by two thirds and upped the veggie content to make it a bit less saturated-fat heavy and a bit more veggie-heavy, plus I figured out that if you're low on chicken breast you can pretty easily sub in lentils in this form, so I think I can call this one mine now. It's kind of my answer to pumpkin spice everything going around this time of year. If I'm in the mood for something spicy and pumpkin flavored, I make up some of this, which is better than the $5 candy-bar-in-drink-form that is a pumpkin spice drink. 

 

EDIT: As a note: Make this only if you have a lot of tupperware handy for packing it up, or if you have guests over - it makes a lot of food (6-8 servings depending on how you portion it) and there will be leftovers. 
Also: You really do have to adjust the spices to taste at the end of cooking - long story short, there can be a lot of variation in flavor 'punch' from a curry paste depending on whether the spices were roasted properly, how old they were before going in to the paste, and how old the paste itself is that for the most consistent end flavor you're going to want to adjust after the flavors have had a chance to marry in the simmering.

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"Kitchen sink" chicken soup

 

This recipe is great for taking care of leftover veggies.

 

Ingredients:

 

* 2 servings chicken (leftovers are fine)

* 1 onion

* 2 tbsp oil of choice

* 1 can tomato paste

* 4 cups chicken broth

* 1/4 cup each dry brown rice, barley, lentils, and yellow peas

* 3 cups assorted mixed veg

Water as needed

1 sprig thyme

2 bay leafs

2 cloves garlic 

Pepper to taste

 

Brown onion and chicken in a pan in oil, add to pot. Add everything but the veggies to the pot, simmer stirring every 15 minutes for 1 hour. Top up with water as needed to prevent boiling dry. Add veggies, stir. Cook an aditional 10 minutes. Remove thyme sprig and bay leaves before eating. Done.

 

From my grad student days when i had to feed myself and my partner on about $70 per month. Lentils and chicken broth give satiety without needing much chicken at all - and my bf and I could eat lunch for a week on a pot of this.

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Sounds like you could make a bone broth out of that if you were willing to get a full bird and keep the bones. That might give you some added protein and satiety. Maybe. You know the recipe better than I do.

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I have way too much bone broth. I even made a Thai green curry soup a few days ago to use some up, and forgot to use that instead of water to dilute the block of creamed coconut into coconut milk. I just can't get rid of this stuff.

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Yeah. I'm going to have a bunch of it after today - turkey day today and then I'll probably make the broth from the bones on Wednesday (Tuesday is martial arts day) so... yeah. I can usually fill at least a big soup pot with broth (if not more). I'll make soup from it but I fully expect to still have a buttload of leftover broth and turkey - which is fine, because I can have alll the turkey curry. Or stew. Or noodle soup. Or etc. 

(people get sick of turkey leftovers because they don't do anything different with it, I think... obviously if you're eating the same exact thing for a week straight you're gonna get sick of it)

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Does anyone have a good recipe for home-made protein bars? Looking to make some today but I've yet to find a recipe I really like. Lots of "I don't mind eating this" recipes but nothing that makes me actually want to carry one for a pre-martial-arts snack.*  


Baked is OK, and I would prefer a non-sticky and non-mushy in texture (non-sticky is way, way more important to me than non-mushy - I hate sticky textures). 

 

*This is a problem because I am prone to forgetting to eat all day and then doing martial arts on like 700 calories in the previous 22 hours, which in turn makes me lightheaded and dizzy and ticks off my reactive hypoglycemia. I get protein bars are less than ideal but it's what I know works for me and I'd like to try to cut down on how much I'm spending on Cliff bars. Cuz those are so tasty, but also so expensive...

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I haven't had any luck myself. Most of the home recipes I find are super-low on protein relative to what I actually want, and while that's fixable I couldn't see how to do it without just throwing lots more ingredient at the recipe and throwing off the macros. :(

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Cliff builders bars are my favorite commercial protein bar (i do need to make sure to be careful to have some cheese or nuts to balance the sugar though) followed in very distant second and third place respectively by a local nut based one and Costco brand (which are sticky :( but sugar free so I don't have to worry about food pairing). I am not married to the cliff bar taste but I would like something that doesnt taste of sweetened chalk like most protein bars...

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Chicken with red onion and herb wine sauce!

 

* two chicken breasts, right?  About 6-8 oz.  Pound them out so they cook evenly

* put some salt/pepper on that chicken, then dredge it in flour

* cook in olive oil - 6-8 minutes on med high heat on one side, flip, 6 mins on medium heat on the other side

* remove chicken breasts from pan

* make sauce in the same pan

 

Sauce

* 1 tsp - 1 tbsp olive oil

* 1/2 red onion

* 1/2 tsp flour (from dredging the chicken)

* 1/2 cup chicken broth (I used water instead b/c I didn't have any broth)

* 1/4 cup dry white wine

* 2 tsp parsley

* 1 tbsp butter

 

Add olive oil to the pan where you cooked the chicken.  Gauge the amount based on amount of chicken juice rendered - add more if necessary.  Add onion, cook until it's softened.  Add flour, cook about a minute more.  Add broth and wine, bring to simmer, cook for about 5 minutes, until reduced.  Off heat, add parsley and butter.  Add salt/pepper if you think the sauce needs it.

 

Put sauce on the chicken and add sides!  I made a side of brown rice and a cucumber/olive salad.

chicken_wine_sauce.jpg

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Yesterday's supper recipe. Or, proof you can cook reasonably healthy foodstuffs even when lazy/tired. I used 2 chicken breast last time but really that was too much protein so for a typical meal I'd suggest using 1. Serves 2.
 

  • 1 tbsp cooking oil
  • 1 diced onion
  • 1 sliced chicken breast
  • 4 cups raw broccoli florets
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Heat the cooking oil in a pan. Cook the onion in the oil. When onion begins to caramelize, add chicken breast, brown outside. Add broccoli florets, water, and garlic. Cover and steam with water until broccoli florets are done, about 5 minutes. Salt and pepper to taste. Serve with potatoes or rice. Gives a total of about 2.5-3.5 servings veggies (depending if you serve with potato or not), 1 serving protein, and 0-1 serving grain (you could serve with 1/2 cup rice instead)

I made cheese mashed potatoes because cheese with broccoli is a match made in food heaven.

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For your macros likely. I am trying to keep sub-1800cal per day sooo... a chicken breast to myself is almost half my protein for a day. Plus i can't eat that much in one sitting.

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hey, it's not something I made myself and may not fit into anyone's macros, but I've started on the kefir bandwagon.  I have a cup of it with a banana for breakfast in the morning, and it has gotten me through retracting total hip replacements, and it's fixed a lot of my digestive issues.  Filling, proteinaceous, fixes the gut microbiota, so...yeah.  If you need a low calorie breakfast fix, maybe give it a try.

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Kefir is great but so expensive where I'm from (literally 1L of kefir is as much as 4L of milk). I've been looking into brewing it myself here. 

Made some split pea and ham soup tonight for supper. Was good. 
 

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Made this dal today: 

https://www.chowhound.com/recipes/easy-spinach-dal-dhal-dhall-30683

Modified the recipe as follows: 

  • Substituted chicken stock for water.
  • Substituted 1 tbsp dried ginger for the fresh ginger
  • Substituted powdered cumin and tumeric for seeds and added them directly to the pot. 
  • Added crushed red pepper because there wasn't quite enough heat and I didn't have another chili. 

Very tasty, and now I am full. :)

That recipe is great for beginners for the following reasons: 

  • If you buy jarred minced garlic, use bottled lemon juice, use squeeze-tube chili, and frozen spinach, literally no knife skills are required
  • 1-pot recipe
  • Split yellow peas stand up very well to overcooking - and you can buy naan at the market if you want to avoid cooking rice

 

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Batch cooking stewed chickpeas today! 1 (ish) pot recipe follows: 

 

  • 2 cups dried chickpeas
  • 12 cups water (or 6 cups water, 6 cups chicken broth)
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 2 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 15-oz can tomatoes or 3-4 fresh diced tomatoes.
  • 2 bay leafs
  • 2 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon paprika (less if you dislike heat)
  • 3 potatoes or sweet potato, diced
  • 3 cups diced veggies of choice (this time it's a mix of mushrooms, snap peas, spinach and red pepper - but you could use damn near anything that's not super starchy as you're getting your starch with the potato)

Start the night before: Take your chickpeas and dump them in a large soup pot. Cover them in about 2" of water (will take around 6 cups of water). Soak overnight (at least 12h). If you are ok with them taking twice as long to cook you can get away without soaking.

 

Drain into a colander and set aside. Rinse and dry the pot, then using the oil, fry up an onion. To the onion, add 6 cups water or chicken broth and the now-soaked chickpeas. Bring to a boil and boil vigorously for at least thirty minutes.* Turn down to a simmer and add the tomatoes and spices. Simmer for just until the chickpeas are almost but not quite tender enough (the older your chickpeas are, the longer they will need to cook before they're ready. Young chickpeas will take about an hour - older chick peas can take as much as two hours or more).

 

Add the diced potatoes and cook another fifteen minutes, then add the veggies and cook until the chickpeas are nicely tender. Taste and adjust flavors to taste at the end. 

 

Recipe is vegetarian, GF, high fiber, free of nuts and can be made low in sodium by avoiding the chicken broth or using low-sodium chicken broth. :) 

* Not as important for chick peas, but a good idea if you're cooking beans and pulses in general - and an absolute must if you're eating red or white kidney beans, fava beans, or broad beans. Reason why it's important to make sure they boil vigorously for at least 30 minutes is something called phytohaemagglutinin, which is a toxic material that will cause severe GI upset if you eat too much of it. Folks who are sensitive to food poisoning - like yours truly - are well advised to err on the side of safety and just boil all pulses for 10 minutes before doing anything else. Doesn't really affect me much cuz I do my cooking on stove top but if you like to use a slow cooker, it's important. Slow cooking at too low a temperature actually increases the amount of toxin in the beans and pulses up to fivefold, so making sure to boil first is very important.

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