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Big time runner here. And put me down as a "ditto" on not knowing what a forum friend does.

 

I'm also on Nike+ running as Pavowski, and occasionally I use SmashRun with the same username. On those sites, you can compare mileage and such. Kinda neat if you're a big running nerd. Like me.

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Ok I'll start this show. I'm a fledling runner(about 11 months) aspiring to be a distance runner.  I run Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. 1 hill run, 1 distance run (up to 8 miles so far), 1 speed run and 1 easy run after which I do strides. I lift 1-2 times a week on running days and do core routines, cycle and sometimes Yoga on off days. Everything is to support running. Just popped off my first 10K race and have signed up for the Kentucky Derby Mini Marathon April 30th. I'm also considering the Louisville Triple Crown the month before (Anthem 5K, Rodes City Run 10K, PapaJohns 10 Miler) with 5 weeks rest before the mini. My normal non race pace seems to settle in around 9:30mi/mi.  Not fast but not slow for a guy about to turn 48. I'm think I'm a middle of the pack runner. I'm also rather anal about my cadence which I've pretty much locked in around a 177.

 

I'm a huge fan of Jason Fitzgerald from Strengthrunning.com(and Camp NerdFitness which i did not attrend). I've purchased his injury prevention program and 2 of his books. I've learned a lot and focus pretty hard on injury prevention (and lord knows I've had my share)

 

Next puzzle piece on my list: Hill sprints

 

That's pretty much it. Who's next?

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57167340.jpg

 

I love doing OCR and that means lots of running, which I luckily also really love. I've always liked running, but never made it a priority until about two years ago where I started doing longer and longer trail runs, working up to tackling a few Spartan Beasts (13-16 miles on ski hills) last summer.

 

I got benched for about 8 months over the winter due to kidney stones and some surgeries to fix them. They weren't that bad, but I did have to take time off. When I started easing back into running this year, I decided to go barefoot and worked myself up to 5K. It has had a huge effect on my form and which muscles I'm activating, so the experiment was a success. Now I'm wearing shoes again (because that road is getting cold on the feet!) and working on bringing up my speed. Last year I ran a 21:43 5K, but my best this year is 24:51, so I have some work to do and my goal is to hit sub 20 over the winter and then build up distance again with the ultimate goal of doing the UltraBeast within the next two years.

 

My schedule is pretty simple and similar to Dilnad's: one tempo run, one sprint run (usually Zombies, Run!) and a long run. (thought right now the long run is only 7K) I do a core workout after all my runs and after two of them, I do a full body workout. I have a 5K race in 5 weeks I plan to hit with my kids, but otherwise, I'll be waiting until next summer to tackle all the obstacle races again.

 

I love reading Running World. Besides the great tips, the stories on the running community all over the world is a great read for me.

 

Next puzzle piece on my list: Breathing

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Another running fan here, been getting back into it over the last couple of months after being out with an injury since December.

Managed a half marathon today as a training run for a race in a couple of weeks, pretty happy - it's been 11 months and 1 week since I ran that kinda distance!

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Romey did mention "beginner runners" and I don't know if it can get more beginner than me, haha.  After reading all these posts I almost feel overwhelmed, but I know everyone has to start somewhere, so I am happily working on being able to run a mile again.  I used to run a lot in school, but that was over 10 years ago, so I'm really out of practice.  I only just began running again 12 days ago.  I run usually every other day, and walking everyday.  

 

I don't have much to offer in advice or tips and tricks or any of that sort, but maybe by sticking around this area I'll be able to learn some.

 

 

Another running fan here, been getting back into it over the last couple of months after being out with an injury since December.

Managed a half marathon today as a training run for a race in a couple of weeks, pretty happy - it's been 11 months and 1 week since I ran that kinda distance!

 

Wow, a half marathon is amazing!  That's quite a win, keep it up :) :)   I read this and hope that someday that'll be me.  You guys are all very inspiring!

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October 31st this year will mark three years since I took up running, and since then I've completed couch to 5k, pushed on to 10k, then a half marathon, and last month my first full marathon.

 

I'm currently resting after my marathon and after getting a slight heel problem, as well as tapering for a half marathon at the weekend. But my usual training schedule in normal times is:

Tuesday - speedwork with my running club, plus another 5k or so running slowly to/from training

Thursday - 10k with hills and a few short sprints

Weekend - long slow run. Distance depending on training stage, but generally 20k+

 

This was more or less my schedule since I got to the point I could do 5k comfortably - one speedwork, one standard run (which was 5k, now 10k), and one long slow run where I'd gradually increase distance.

 

My advice (for what it's worth) for newer runners is....

 

1)  Don't do it unless you enjoy it. If you don't enjoy it, it'll last only as long as your willpower does. Find something else you do enjoy.

2)  Get proper running shoes that fit you. I reckon your running shoes should be the single most comfortable pair of shoes you own.

3)  You're probably doing some of the hardest running you'll ever do right now - physically and mentally. The first bit is the hardest. Going from 0k-5k is far, far, far tougher than going from 5k to 10k. And once you've done that, it's just training, practice, time, avoiding injury, and how far you want to run.

4)  You don't have to half-kill yourself in every training session. Don't overdo it. "No pain, no gain" might be trueish, but "more pain, more gain" isn't true. Nicely tired is fine. Save the pain for race day!

4)  Don't worry about what other, more experienced runners are thinking about you. Firstly, chances are that they're not thinking about you. Secondly, if they are thinking about you, chances are they think you're awesome. A few weeks before my marathon I was running in my local park and there were a lot of runners out there putting the finishing touches to their marathon or half marathon training. But the still-slightly-overweight-guy I saw running up that hill pouring with sweat was working harder than any of us, and it took more guts for him to be out running than the various gazelles and greyhounds smoothly bounding around the lake.

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My advice (for what it's worth) for newer runners is....

 

1)  Don't do it unless you enjoy it. If you don't enjoy it, it'll last only as long as your willpower does. Find something else you do enjoy.

2)  Get proper running shoes that fit you. I reckon your running shoes should be the single most comfortable pair of shoes you own.

3)  You're probably doing some of the hardest running you'll ever do right now - physically and mentally. The first bit is the hardest. Going from 0k-5k is far, far, far tougher than going from 5k to 10k. And once you've done that, it's just training, practice, time, avoiding injury, and how far you want to run.

4)  You don't have to half-kill yourself in every training session. Don't overdo it. "No pain, no gain" might be trueish, but "more pain, more gain" isn't true. Nicely tired is fine. Save the pain for race day!

4)  Don't worry about what other, more experienced runners are thinking about you. Firstly, chances are that they're not thinking about you. Secondly, if they are thinking about you, chances are they think you're awesome. A few weeks before my marathon I was running in my local park and there were a lot of runners out there putting the finishing touches to their marathon or half marathon training. But the still-slightly-overweight-guy I saw running up that hill pouring with sweat was working harder than any of us, and it took more guts for him to be out running than the various gazelles and greyhounds smoothly bounding around the lake.

 

This advice is pure gold. Can't possibly agree with it more!!!

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Sorry I'm late with the response.  But glad to see a lot of you on here.  Right now, I'm close to reaching my goal of running non-stop for 30 minutes straight.  Then I want to train for the Lagoon Valley Half Marathon in Vacaville, CA.  They have a 5K session which I'm going to start with running a 5K before I jump to the others. 

 

And just to clarify, I'm also looking to connect with experienced runners so I can pick some brains. The beginning runner search was so I can have a team that's on the same level as me running wise.  But every Jedi needs a Jedi Master. 

 

Hope we can keep this going.

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There's usually a live or current thread around here somewhere about running in general - there was a "first half marathon" thread a while back which was lovely. Please feel free to ask any questions you have here, and I'm sure others will chip in with their questions too.  I've not yet seen a question about running posted here that's not got a lot of high quality answers, and I think what this place does particularly well is that we've got people at a lot of different stages with their running. I think this is important because sometimes the person you want to ask about completing your first 5k is the person who's just completed her first 10k, rather than the person who's just won a marathon.

 

In other news, congrats to Dilnad on your first half, and on your fitness journey in general - enjoyed reading that the other week.

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In other news, congrats to Dilnad on your first half, and on your fitness journey in general - enjoyed reading that the other week.

 

Thanks so much. It's a good thing I've been dancing around for 2 days without my feet even touching the floor, because they still hurt HAHA!!

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Hey all, I have a question.  My friend told me it's a good idea to get one of those gps watches to learn what my pace is.  I'm looking at them on amazon and saw some come with heart rate monitors.  Those tend to be more money, and I was wondering if it's worth the cost?  Like, by knowing your heart rate, does that help prevent possible injury?  I'm trying to read up on it but I feel like I'm just being advertised to, so I don't really know what to think.  I do know I want to be able to track distance, time, pace, and to be able to set intervals....so if anyone has any suggestions, it'd be much appreciated.

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Do you have a decent phone? You can use Runkeeper or other apps to do pretty much all the same things a watch would do. This isn't to say not to get a watch- I have an iPhone and I just got a GPS watch. But it would let you have a good idea of what you would like to get out of your watch before you buy it. You can also get heart rate monitors to work with your phone as well.

 

I personally haven't done any heart rate training. As I understand it, it's a way to set your run intensity based on your effort. Instead of trying to base your efforts on pace and what you believe your effort would be, this is a different way of measuring it. A few friends who do use HR monitors seem to use it for long runs where you want a steady, consistent effort throughout the entire run. It can also be used for intervals to determine when you're fully rested and ready for the next one.

 

Most watches also let you buy the HR monitor afterward. (chest strap) So you can use your GPS watch as is without it and get the HR monitoring afterward if you find you need it.

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I don't own a smartphone so I can't do any of those cool apps :(  I'm looking into getting either the Garmin Forerunner 10 or the 15.  Amazon sells both versions refurbished so they're a lot cheaper than regular price, so it fits into my budget.  It looks like the main difference between the two is that the 15 has the capabilities of adding on a HRM.  

 

Ah I see, so tracking is either pace-based or HR-based.  I'm really new to all of this so I have no idea what I'm tracking, haha.  I believe it's only a $20 difference between the two watches if I go the refurbished route, so maybe I'll get the 15 (I'm still gonna take some time to think it over though).  That way, like you said, I can add a chest strap later if I want.  I do want to run long distances eventually.  I've only been running for about a month now, so I'm happy that I am just getting out there and moving, but I would like to be able to run a 5k next spring and a 10k next fall, so I figure I should learn how to track my efforts.

 

Thanks an bunch for your input! 

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Pace and HR are unrelated metrics (other than a faster pace will mean a faster HR). I check my HR for pure curiosity via my fitbit but I don't HR train. That's the cream of the crop for hardcore training. You won't hurt yourself by not tracking your heart rate. In fact, Jason Fitzgerald (Camp Nerdfitness running coach) is not a fan of HR tracking. he teaches his students to run by feel/effort.

 

Here's one of his articles..

http://strengthrunning.com/2014/03/running-by-feel/

 

Now I DO use a GPS watch (Garmin Forerunner 220) because I like tracking my distance, pace and cadence. Also because I'm a nerd and I dig gadgets but they are not required to be a runner.

 

With all that being said, I'd weigh my options on cash. How much more is the 15 than the 10? Is it worth the money "in case" you decide you want a heart rate strap later and wont want to buy a new watch?

 

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Thanks for that article, Dilnad!  That was actually very insightful (and I'm looking forward to reading more of his articles after I type this out).  I'll admit, I like the idea of running by feel.  I just don't know how to judge what my pace is, thus the hunt for a watch.  I'm still flip flopping on getting one with the HRM capabilities.  Part of me is curious, but the other part doesn't like the idea of wearing a chest strap - are those even comfortable?  

 

My biggest concern was possible injury from having a heart rate that was too high, but if that's not an issue...  What brought all this on was when I went running with a friend.  We mostly kept at my pace but he'd push me to keep going if I was feeling tired and by the end of it I could feel my heart pumping way faster than I think I ever felt it go.  I like pushing myself, but I didn't know if it was possible to push too much.  

 

Looks like I still have a lot to learn and a lot to think about.

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Well you can't push your heart past redline or anything like that really. Your max heart rate is simply the fastest your heart is able to function and it wont go faster. It's not good to always operate in that zone. Most of your runs should be at a comfortable "conversational" pace. What that pace is for each person is different. For me, my comfortable easy pace is between 9:30/mile and 10:00/mile. For my friend it's between 12:00/mile and 12:30/mile and then for others it may be an 8 minute mile. If you can hold a chat with another runner, your pace is correct for a regular run.

 

I absolutely hate HR straps thus why I used a wrist based monitor ( FitBit Charge HR). I hoe this winter to replace my watch and get the new Forerunnr 235 with built in HR on the wrist.

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One thing I do when I want a run by feel is to take my GPS watch with me but I don't look at it until after the run. I can think about my run afterwards and judge how it felt and any high or low points. Then I look at the GPS data and see how that compares to what actually happened. It can surprise you sometimes, but it also gives you a good idea of how to start judging these metrics on your own.

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You both are wonderful.  I've been reading about this all morning on so many different sites.  I think I finally decided on a refurbished Garmin FR 15 just because with winter coming (we get heaps of snow where I am), I can get one of those foot pod thingies for running on the indoor track at the gym.  I'm not so worried about tracking heart rate anymore, but I'm curious enough to try it out eventually.  Glad to hear there are wrist options, so if I ever decide to upgrade and I like tracking heart rate, I may look into one of those.

 

I'd like to use the watch as a tool, but not be dependent on it, so I'll probably try to follow your example, Quirky.  And I'll definitely be keeping the conversational pace in mind.  When I went running with my friend, I was able to hold a conversation at the beginning, but by the end of our run I was focusing so much on breathing that I couldn't talk to save my life.

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I can get one of those foot pod thingies for running on the indoor track at the gym.

Foot pods are also great on those rare days the weather is crappy and you can't get a GPS lock. They also track your cadence (an  important metric to me)The downside of them is our watch can only handle one paired to it. This means if you switch out shoes (I have several pair I run in and swap out to help prevent repetitive motion injuries as each par of shoes is different), you have to swap the foot pod over rather than own multiple ones. If you do try and pair a different one you wipe the footpod profile where it learns about your gait over time from the GPS and increases accuracy of its non GPS measurement. This was another reason I went with the Forerunner 200. It is able to record cadence and treadmill workouts via the built in accelerometer that uses your arm swing rather than your foot swing. The downside being the 220 is a lot more expensive.

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