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If S&S means Sit and Stand, I had to do the modified version.  I got through the sit-up part but, the standing is another story...   :D

 

Welcome!  I'm just starting KBs myself.  As for S&S, it's Simple and Sinister...  Link.

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Welcome! I'm just starting KBs myself. As for S&S, it's Simple and Sinister... Link.

I have added that to my amazon wish list and may buy the kindle version, so long as the descriptions and illustrations are good enough to ensure proper form.
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I'm still a beginner at the TGUs but they seem like exactly the sort of thing where I'd expect a very rapid improvement in the first few months. It is a complex movement, and your body needs to learn how to organize itself efficiently for maximum power. So when you start out, it feels like, "Damn, I can barely do this with 20lb" because you are not using your strength efficiently. One you get the hang of it, even though you aren't vastly stronger, you are now using 90% of your strength to do the weight, rather than 20%.

 

Just in the past few weeks, 35lb TGUs have gone from "No f-in way" flailing like a bug on the ground to "Yeah, lets get a 35lb kb after this challenge." And that is strictly an increase in skill, not strength.

That is pretty much how it went at first with me, went through several weights quickly. Course, then when I got to the 35lb weight, I plateaud and couldn't do those forever .Just now getting the 35 lb,after hitting 30 lb mark in July

 

Regarding Prying Goblet Squats - Yesterday, I tried out a few options, and decided that the bridges are held for 3-seconds, so I'll hold the Prying squats for 3-seconds, and treat the long list of movements to do while in the squat as a buffet of options rather than a mandatory sequence each time. Squat down, 3 seconds of any combination of wiggling, twisting, prying, releasing the hips, settling into a wider stance, or curling, and then back up. I think the prying squat is likely to show up in my yoga classes - we don't have kbs, but I think we might at least have sandbags to add a little weight. Even unweighted, it is pretty great.

 

 

 

Also, despite trying to be by-the-book, I've already made a few alterations. One is adding five sun salutations and five handstands to the mobility drills, because I'm doing those anyway and might as well stack it all in together. (Also, I learned the hard way that handstands AFTER kettlebells is a bad idea... )

 

The other change is the stretches at the end - as a yoga teacher, I've got a few dozen different hip openers at my disposal. I like the 90-90 with chest to foot, but with the 90-90 chest to knee I vastly prefer to straighten the back leg and roll it under into the easy variation of one-leg-pigeon pose. (The hard version puts your back foot on your head, which is just not on the agenda right now.) It gets a very similar opening in my hip, and is a lot more comfortable on my knee.

 

Overall, I think it is a really solid set of five exercises they've picked for the warm up and cool down. While I might add to them, personally wouldn't drop any of them. I was even thinking - because I can't leave well enough alone - if there is anything I'd substitute for the bridges or the halos or QL straddle, and nope, those are all solid choices. That is really a mark of a good program, because I have a good deal more mobility than I think a lot of his target market and he's not presenting scaled options. Yet aside from that one little change to the 90-90, I like this just the way it is. The 90-90 is exactly what I give students who can't manage pigeon pose, and the 90-90 is simpler to teach.

I like that plan for the prying squat, I will try it

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Got a Crane Kettlebell Set with my wife Tanya from Aldi.  Yeah, the set isn't the best with plastic handle and plastic molding around concrete weights but, for $20 you get  a 5lb, 10lb,. and 15lb bell, a position/exercise guide, and a DVD.  Not a bad deal for a beginner.  Obviously when I get to bigger bells I will be going to Amazon (or somewhere) and paying just over $1 per pound for cast metal ones that are one piece.

 

I found an intermediate YouTube video that I thought I could keep up with last week.  NOPE.  I was only able to keep up with the first set of exercises and then couldn't keep up once the speed increased.  I was also sore for two days

 

Last night I tried the DVD that came with the set. The DVD  was much slower and easier to keep up with.  Still a great workout.  It doesn't have cleans or full swings, only shoulder level.  That being said, it is a start.

 

Right now my goal is mastering the movements.  Once those are down I will look to increasing weight, reps, etc.  I'm starting at 10lb to be on the safe side.

 

 

 

My first set was from Walmart. Worked just fine. I did take some sandpaper to the handles, as they were super smooth

 

I have added that to my amazon wish list and may buy the kindle version, so long as the descriptions and illustrations are good enough to ensure proper form.

One of the things I really like about the book is how detailed Pavel is in describing form. He also has some great drills to practice form before you even start with weight.

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My first set was from Walmart. Worked just fine. I did take some sandpaper to the handles, as they were super smooth

One of the things I really like about the book is how detailed Pavel is in describing form. He also has some great drills to practice form before you even start with weight.

I will probably purchase this in the near future then. Sounds like a regular recommendation around here.
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I'm still a beginner at the TGUs but they seem like exactly the sort of thing where I'd expect a very rapid improvement in the first few months. It is a complex movement, and your body needs to learn how to organize itself efficiently for maximum power. So when you start out, it feels like, "Damn, I can barely do this with 20lb" because you are not using your strength efficiently. One you get the hang of it, even though you aren't vastly stronger, you are now using 90% of your strength to do the weight, rather than 20%.

 

Just in the past few weeks, 35lb TGUs have gone from "No f-in way" flailing like a bug on the ground to "Yeah, lets get a 35lb kb after this challenge." And that is strictly an increase in skill, not strength.

 

It was the opposite for me, the Swings were really progressing, the TGUs were my issue. Then again, I'm not exactly proportioned like a normal human. Started out at a bodyweight of 137 lbs with a 400-pound deadlift, so really the grip was my limiting factor for the Swings. Doing a TGU with over half bodyweight tends to be a bit of a challenge. (Though the hardest getup I do is one from the couch.)

 

For the record, you don't want maximum power with grind movements like the TGU, but rather maximum tension. The principle behind Simple & Sinister (and his original minimalist kettlebell program) is one grind movement [which you execute slower than comfortable] and one ballistic movement [which you execute faster than comfortable]. But yeah I think I understand, you meant neuromuscular efficiency, which is a huge concept in StrongFirst. They actually refer to "workouts" as "practice", because strength is learned first.

 

One of the things I really like about the book is how detailed Pavel is in describing form. He also has some great drills to practice form before you even start with weight.

 

Absolutely. It's great how it pretty much incorporates most of his previous principles into one program. I think with a few kettlebells and the books Simple & Sinister and Enter The Kettlebell a person can have over a year or two of good training, as long as one's attention span does not waver.

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I have added that to my amazon wish list and may buy the kindle version, so long as the descriptions and illustrations are good enough to ensure proper form.

 

I think he does a good job of explaining the form, but to supplement it (or just to check out beforehand) the StrongFirst videos are going to describe the exact same style for the swing and the TGU, because that is his school and they do certifications with a detailed list of exactly how each must be done. In fact, if you want a video of it, here are the StrongFirst SFG Kettlebell 1 standards. The first two covered are the swing and the TGU. It doesn't show one-hand swing, and he does the two-hand swing with a pair of kb rather than one, but it is a good visual of their standards for what constitutes a "correct" hardstyle rep. (Which is a little different in some cases than GS competition style.)

 

He's also really firm that you need to completely master one weight before moving up to a heavier one, which is a great tool to drill proper form.

 

He does want you to start out pretty heavy. Men at a 24kg/53lb swing and 16kg/35lb get-up, women at a 16kg/35lb swing and an 8kg/18lb getup. (And the "strong gentlemen" should start with a 53lb get up.  :nightmare: ) That is a little over ambitious for a lot of us nerds, but I don't know that I'd want anyone to go less than 35lb for two-handed swings. 

 

My only complaint with the Simple & Sinister book is that I often wish Pavel's writing style was tighter and more organized. He seems to be one of those folks who writes like he speaks, so anecdotes and random stuff all mixed in everything. So I wound up copying sections out of the ebook, pasting into a different document, and cutting out all the fluff. It is an engaging style, fun to read, but tedious to use for reference.

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I think he does a good job of explaining the form, but to supplement it (or just to check out beforehand) the StrongFirst videos are going to describe the exact same style for the swing and the TGU, because that is his school and they do certifications with a detailed list of exactly how each must be done. In fact, if you want a video of it, here are the StrongFirst SFG Kettlebell 1 standards. The first two covered are the swing and the TGU. It doesn't show one-hand swing, and he does the two-hand swing with a pair of kb rather than one, but it is a good visual of their standards for what constitutes a "correct" hardstyle rep. (Which is a little different in some cases than GS competition style.)

 

He's also really firm that you need to completely master one weight before moving up to a heavier one, which is a great tool to drill proper form.

 

He does want you to start out pretty heavy. Men at a 24kg/53lb swing and 16kg/35lb get-up, women at a 16kg/35lb swing and an 8kg/18lb getup. (And the "strong gentlemen" should start with a 53lb get up.  :nightmare: ) That is a little over ambitious for a lot of us nerds, but I don't know that I'd want anyone to go less than 35lb for two-handed swings. 

 

My only complaint with the Simple & Sinister book is that I often wish Pavel's writing style was tighter and more organized. He seems to be one of those folks who writes like he speaks, so anecdotes and random stuff all mixed in everything. So I wound up copying sections out of the ebook, pasting into a different document, and cutting out all the fluff. It is an engaging style, fun to read, but tedious to use for reference.

 

Thank you for the video link.  I found that very helpful!

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You could always do a form check video.

I highly recommend this. And then re video yourself often. One of the reasons I had to go back to a lower weight was somewhere along the line, I started trying to get more weight, and my form got sloppy. One of my goals this time is to video myself at the beginning and end of challenge.  

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For the record, you don't want maximum power with grind movements like the TGU, but rather maximum tension. The principle behind Simple & Sinister (and his original minimalist kettlebell program) is one grind movement [which you execute slower than comfortable] and one ballistic movement [which you execute faster than comfortable]. But yeah I think I understand, you meant neuromuscular efficiency, which is a huge concept in StrongFirst. They actually refer to "workouts" as "practice", because strength is learned first.

 

Yes, that was awkwardly worded on my part. I'm not sure how to describe some of this stuff. The getup actually seems a lot like my yoga practice, where generally you don't want "maximum" anything. You want precisely as much as is needed, and no more. I like that. 

 

And from a yoga background, we always call it "practice", I think with the same meaning. So that part of the philosophy is a natural fit for me.

 

One question - I've heard the getup referred to a few times as a "grind movement". What does that mean? I mean I get the dichotomy of the two movements, the powerful dynamic movement and the slow controlled movement, but is there something else to it? When I refer to a particular exercise as a grind, I mean something where you have to crank out a huge number of reps of something tedious, and that is clearly not what is meant here. Whenever I hear that term, it makes me pause and I have to remember, "Oh, they don't mean that in a bad way." but I'm not sure what they *do* mean by it.

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That Get Up video is more about the standards of performance the get certified and not at all about how to actually get better at the movement. From the time that your weighted shoulder leaves the floor until the time your unweighted arm leaves the floor is the heart and soul of that exercise and it got no time at all. When you video yourself, watch your posture should to shoulder more than anything else, most people begin to roll their shoulders together as the weight goes up or the get tired, it needs to be a straight line. That line should always be moving towards lining up with the straight lines of your upper arms and eventually upper and lower arms. 

Those are the mistakes I see the most often. The rarely get flagged as "bad" lift but they will stop your progress. 

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The other change is the stretches at the end - as a yoga teacher, I've got a few dozen different hip openers at my disposal. I like the 90-90 with chest to foot, but with the 90-90 chest to knee I vastly prefer to straighten the back leg and roll it under into the easy variation of one-leg-pigeon pose. (The hard version puts your back foot on your head, which is just not on the agenda right now.) It gets a very similar opening in my hip, and is a lot more comfortable on my knee.

 

Overall, I think it is a really solid set of five exercises they've picked for the warm up and cool down. While I might add to them, personally wouldn't drop any of them. I was even thinking - because I can't leave well enough alone - if there is anything I'd substitute for the bridges or the halos or QL straddle, and nope, those are all solid choices. That is really a mark of a good program, because I have a good deal more mobility than I think a lot of his target market and he's not presenting scaled options. Yet aside from that one little change to the 90-90, I like this just the way it is. The 90-90 is exactly what I give students who can't manage pigeon pose, and the 90-90 is simpler to teach.

I do yoga every morning and the 90-90 stretch always feels weird to me, because I feel like I should straighten the back leg. Maybe I'll just give in and do the one legged pigeon pose instead.

 

Awesome way to progress. I worked a female student up on TGUs from zero to 10 in 10 minutes with a 16kg in about 8 weeks. We started out with an 8kg and broke it down into parts, really exploring the movement with shoulder rotations and hanging out in the positions (just the pickup and lockout, roll-up to elbow, to sitting, the high bridge, getups with a shoe, then full). We seemed to be able to progress the TGU a lot faster than the Swing, though we were doing high-rep swings, which may or may not have been detrimental to learning maximal power output.

Here is an excellent breakdown of the movement with Gray Cook and Doc Mark Cheng:

Thanks! I seem to be having an easier time with the swings than the TGU's myself. It took a while for the movements to feel "right" and keeping my shoulders in line was the thing I had to work hardest at.

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I highly recommend this. And then re video yourself often. One of the reasons I had to go back to a lower weight was somewhere along the line, I started trying to get more weight, and my form got sloppy. One of my goals this time is to video myself at the beginning and end of challenge.  

 

At what weight does your form start to break down? I remember reading that the optimal weight for maximum power output is around 30% bodyweight or something. I noticed that at 24kg my Swings had a good snap to them, which I could not do for the 32kg, even though I was banging out 20 in a row with no warmup every minute for 10. I suppose at some point you just lose that snap and it just looks more sluggish.

 

Yes, that was awkwardly worded on my part. I'm not sure how to describe some of this stuff. The getup actually seems a lot like my yoga practice, where generally you don't want "maximum" anything. You want precisely as much as is needed, and no more. I like that. 

 

And from a yoga background, we always call it "practice", I think with the same meaning. So that part of the philosophy is a natural fit for me.

 

One question - I've heard the getup referred to a few times as a "grind movement". What does that mean? I mean I get the dichotomy of the two movements, the powerful dynamic movement and the slow controlled movement, but is there something else to it? When I refer to a particular exercise as a grind, I mean something where you have to crank out a huge number of reps of something tedious, and that is clearly not what is meant here. Whenever I hear that term, it makes me pause and I have to remember, "Oh, they don't mean that in a bad way." but I'm not sure what they *do* mean by it.

 

Actually, I believe the entire premise behind Hardstyle training is maximizing everything--max power, max tension. It's about the journey, not the destination, so to speak; it is not about efficiency at all, otherwise the movements and the breathing would flow a lot smoother like in GS Style. Grinds are slow movements where you maintain tension throughout the entire range of motion. There is no time component to it. If you've ever pulled a maximal heavy Deadlift, Press, Squat, or Pull-up, it's a slow rep that feels like forever, and you have to really grind it out to lock out. You want to maintain maintain maximal tension throughout your entire body up to your fingers, white knuckling your fists and crushing that handle whenever you perform these movements in order to minimize force leaks in the kinetic chain. Notice the total body tension for a single-arm grind movement:

 

strongfirst-kettlebell-military-press-pr

 

That Get Up video is more about the standards of performance the get certified and not at all about how to actually get better at the movement. From the time that your weighted shoulder leaves the floor until the time your unweighted arm leaves the floor is the heart and soul of that exercise and it got no time at all. When you video yourself, watch your posture should to shoulder more than anything else, most people begin to roll their shoulders together as the weight goes up or the get tired, it needs to be a straight line. That line should always be moving towards lining up with the straight lines of your upper arms and eventually upper and lower arms. 

Those are the mistakes I see the most often. The rarely get flagged as "bad" lift but they will stop your progress. 

 

Are you talking about the TGU videos or the Level 1 Standards video? I thought the TGU videos were pretty good.

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At what weight does your form start to break down? I remember reading that the optimal weight for maximum power output is around 30% bodyweight or something. I noticed that at 24kg my Swings had a good snap to them, which I could not do for the 32kg, even though I was banging out 20 in a row with no warmup every minute for 10. I suppose at some point you just lose that snap and it just looks more sluggish.

That just means you're not strong enough yet. 24 to 32 is a huge gap. Much bigger than for example 16 to 24. Ideally it should all look the same no matter what weight you're using.

 

 

Actually, I believe the entire premise behind Hardstyle training is maximizing everything--max power, max tension. It's about the journey, not the destination, so to speak; it is not about efficiency at all, otherwise the movements and the breathing would flow a lot smoother like in GS Style. Grinds are slow movements where you maintain tension throughout the entire range of motion. There is no time component to it. If you've ever pulled a maximal heavy Deadlift, Press, Squat, or Pull-up, it's a slow rep that feels like forever, and you have to really grind it out to lock out. You want to maintain maintain maximal tension throughout your entire body up to your fingers, white knuckling your fists and crushing that handle whenever you perform these movements in order to minimize force leaks in the kinetic chain. Notice the total body tension for a single-arm grind movement:

Good description. Also illustrates nicely why I vastly prefer GS :D I like efficiency, being able to breath through a movement. I like how much harder it is to maintain tension where you need it and relax where you don't (that goes for parts of the movement but also for bodyparts). It's actually one of the hardest things to do, to maintain tension in your back, maintain a grip, but relax as much as possible in your arms or legs or neck.

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Are you talking about the TGU videos or the Level 1 Standards video? I thought the TGU videos were pretty good.

I was talking about the StrongFirst one. The Gray Cook one has a couple good drills (I'm a firm believer in the hip bridge as a part of a TGU) but it also slops through what I think is the toughest and most technical part of the movement, the rise from the back to the lunge position (NOTE: it's earl morning here so I had the sound off. I missed out on the discussion after the demo). I see lots of folks attempt to just situp through it. I maintain that it's a question of levers. Somewhere above you mentioned your weight, 180 or so I think. You can't really situp with 32 kg on your chest without someone bracing your legs. That means that for you to TGU you have to change the leverage by moving the bell down and across your body. If you do that right, you'll practically pop up to the elbow position. With a minor adjustment you can roll up to your hand without executing an awkward tricep extension. If your position is right, your hips are free to move no matter how much weight you have above your shoulders as you go into the lunge.

 

That's the meat and potatoes of the TGU as I see it. The initial press and final lunge shouldn't really be a question with the kind of weight you're working with in this lift. It's possible that since you're such a strong hardstyle advocate you might want it to be harder to complete the movement at lighter weights but I'd just say it's time to go heavier rather than more hardstyle. I think using leverage and straight limbs keeps the movement safer as your letting the bones and joints do the work and using the muscles only for transitions, minimizing opportunities to lose control of the bell.

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I haven't had the opportunity to look through the videos yet but, I want to thank everyone for posting the resources and for the encouragement.  My eyes gloss over here or there once the more experienced and technique-based chat starts but, that is to be expected.

 

Regarding Pavel's 35lb suggestion, I know myself and know it would be too much weight, at least to start.  When I was doing exercises in the past, I was only up to 8lb weights.  My concerns are getting form down and preventing risk of injury.  Hence me starting with 10lb eventually moving to 15lb, etc.

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Actually, I believe the entire premise behind Hardstyle training is maximizing everything--max power, max tension. It's about the journey, not the destination, so to speak; it is not about efficiency at all, otherwise the movements and the breathing would flow a lot smoother like in GS Style. Grinds are slow movements where you maintain tension throughout the entire range of motion. There is no time component to it. If you've ever pulled a maximal heavy Deadlift, Press, Squat, or Pull-up, it's a slow rep that feels like forever, and you have to really grind it out to lock out. You want to maintain maintain maximal tension throughout your entire body up to your fingers, white knuckling your fists and crushing that handle whenever you perform these movements in order to minimize force leaks in the kinetic chain. Notice the total body tension for a single-arm grind movement:

 

OH! Okay. That makes sense. Slow, but max tension. I've done Qi Gung like that. Some of the power yoga styles are like that. (I do Ashtanga, which is very much efficiently minimizing the amount of force and tension, making the movement effortless, floating through it.)

 

Thank you, that article is very helpful. Okay, maximum tension. I'll give that a try.

 

 

 I see lots of folks attempt to just situp through it. I maintain that it's a question of levers. Somewhere above you mentioned your weight, 180 or so I think. You can't really situp with 32 kg on your chest without someone bracing your legs. That means that for you to TGU you have to change the leverage by moving the bell down and across your body. If you do that right, you'll practically pop up to the elbow position. With a minor adjustment you can roll up to your hand without executing an awkward tricep extension. If your position is right, your hips are free to move no matter how much weight you have above your shoulders as you go into the lunge.

 

Oooh... Also a good point. That is something I work with a lot in yoga, leverage and the position of your center of mass relative to your base of support. I definitely have been underestimating how much the added weight changes things, especially for a lighter person. 

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I haven't had the opportunity to look through the videos yet but, I want to thank everyone for posting the resources and for the encouragement.  My eyes gloss over here or there once the more experienced and technique-based chat starts but, that is to be expected.

 

Regarding Pavel's 35lb suggestion, I know myself and know it would be too much weight, at least to start.  When I was doing exercises in the past, I was only up to 8lb weights.  My concerns are getting form down and preventing risk of injury.  Hence me starting with 10lb eventually moving to 15lb, etc.

35lb is a big weight. Good idea to get your form down. The one tricky thing to balance is that if you go to heavy, it is hard to get the hip swing, but if you are too light it gets a bit easier to flop your body around and not really use the hip swing. Not sure if that makes sense or not. In some ways, lighter is harder because you have to keep yourself from swinging the bell too high, and relying on your arm strength instead of hip strength.

This is a good drill to make you are using your hipshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kec1cOmY74A

 

I'd like to join too. I have kettlebells in my challenge.

Hey, Scrawl, good to see you, welcome! I need to check out your  challenge

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35lb is a big weight. Good idea to get your form down. The one tricky thing to balance is that if you go to heavy, it is hard to get the hip swing, but if you are too light it gets a bit easier to flop your body around and not really use the hip swing. Not sure if that makes sense or not. In some ways, lighter is harder because you have to keep yourself from swinging the bell too high, and relying on your arm strength instead of hip strength.

I definitely agree with this. When I first started with S&S and was just working on understanding the motion I used my 8kg 'bell for my swings. I never really did the movements right until I moved up to the 16kg though, because it was just too light. 

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That just means you're not strong enough yet. 24 to 32 is a huge gap. Much bigger than for example 16 to 24. Ideally it should all look the same no matter what weight you're using.

 

 

Good description. Also illustrates nicely why I vastly prefer GS :D I like efficiency, being able to breath through a movement. I like how much harder it is to maintain tension where you need it and relax where you don't (that goes for parts of the movement but also for bodyparts). It's actually one of the hardest things to do, to maintain tension in your back, maintain a grip, but relax as much as possible in your arms or legs or neck.

 

I'd think it's more technique than anything for me. I mean I've only been swinging for a little over a year and I can properly Swing a 48kg for reps, but my 8kg probably does not look like my 24kg or even my 16kg swing.

 

GS is definitely a lot more technical. I believe in the CrossFit Kettlebell course they teach Hardstyle for level 1 then they introduce GS style for level 2.

 

I was talking about the StrongFirst one. The Gray Cook one has a couple good drills (I'm a firm believer in the hip bridge as a part of a TGU) but it also slops through what I think is the toughest and most technical part of the movement, the rise from the back to the lunge position (NOTE: it's earl morning here so I had the sound off. I missed out on the discussion after the demo). I see lots of folks attempt to just situp through it. I maintain that it's a question of levers. Somewhere above you mentioned your weight, 180 or so I think. You can't really situp with 32 kg on your chest without someone bracing your legs. That means that for you to TGU you have to change the leverage by moving the bell down and across your body. If you do that right, you'll practically pop up to the elbow position. With a minor adjustment you can roll up to your hand without executing an awkward tricep extension. If your position is right, your hips are free to move no matter how much weight you have above your shoulders as you go into the lunge.

 

That's the meat and potatoes of the TGU as I see it. The initial press and final lunge shouldn't really be a question with the kind of weight you're working with in this lift. It's possible that since you're such a strong hardstyle advocate you might want it to be harder to complete the movement at lighter weights but I'd just say it's time to go heavier rather than more hardstyle. I think using leverage and straight limbs keeps the movement safer as your letting the bones and joints do the work and using the muscles only for transitions, minimizing opportunities to lose control of the bell.

 

Oh, it's not a TGU instruction piece, it's a drill to slow down the movement and explore the stable positions throughout (hence "speed bumps"). I believe she has the instructions in the book. I don't think you missed much, just discussions about the importance of slowing down and footwork and stuff.

 

I get what you're saying about the sit-up Getup though; I had my students try to do that several times, that's why I start them out with a bent elbow on the unloaded arm. I think I used to do it when I was starting out, but like they say in StrongFirst, heavy TGUs are self-correcting.

 

And no, I'm 137. I TGU with 80, so I think I'll stay at this weight for a while and really explore the movement before shelling out mad cash to buy that 90-pound Bigfoot Bell from Onnit.

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GS is definitely a lot more technical. I believe in the CrossFit Kettlebell course they teach Hardstyle for level 1 then they introduce GS style for level 2.

Really? That sounds like a pretty bad idea to me, then you'd have to go and unlearn a lot of your habits. It's so much easier to teach someone GS who hasn't ever held a kettlebell before, and it's always the hardstylers that struggle the most. In some key ways it's just polar opposites.

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