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It'll be opposite of AJJ. BJJ-ka are fantastic ground fighters. Their standing game, though. It leaves something to be desired.

That's just what I hear from judoka who know more than I, though. And since there's usually one or two cross-trainers anyway, I'm sure you'll find some people who can throw just fine.

What to expect? Well, it will be the manliest low-impact aerobics class you have ever been to in your life. Occasionally, it will hurt really bad.

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I have my first BJJ class tomorrow night. I've done a little Aikijutsu before, so I imagine the throwing would be quite similar. What should I expect?

It will be nothing like Aikijitsu. ...and how good someones throws are is a complete variable in a BJJ club, we have several Judo black belts in our club (including one Olympian) who hold white or blue belts in BJJ (also people could prefer freestyle wrestling to Judo based takedowns like I do - especially since direct leg attacks were removed from sport judo most of the newer black belts I've rolled with can't even sprawl a basic double leg). It's also a variable as to how much throwing or guard jumping from standing you'll do during a normal training session anyway since not even throwing someone is a very viable option for us. I know clubs who'll do almost none and I know clubs who use it as an integral part of a warm-up.

Some good clubs up in Scotland - hard to beat the Griphouse in Glasgow, those guys are some of the nicest killers I know....although slightly crazy ;-)

Expect: warmups using functional body movements, technique based drilling of a few positions/transitions/submissions followed by a few rounds of sparring. As it's your first session, what level of sparring they involve you in will be up to them.

Have fun! Greatest sport on the planet bar none.

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Expect your back to hurt if you're a smaller person and are in guard all of the time (it's one of the positions you'll learn). I was really surprised after the next day of rolling at how much my lower back was giving me trouble.

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So how did that first class go? I'd love to hear an update.

I myself have been doing BJJ (specifically Gracie JJ) off-and-on since late 2007. Its a really crazy workout if you are new to fitness. Everytime I take a break for a couple months, the class I start up again kicks by butt all over the place. By the end of the class when you start "rolling" (ie: sparring), I usually end up focusing on trying to breathe more than not getting my arm broken.

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Bursthaggis - how was your class? Hopefully you are taken by it with an interest to continue. I started BJJ (under a school trained by Gracie) since August 2011 and I fell in love with it. There are so much to learn. It's like working with a puzzle, with millions of potential moves and techniques you can use on the mat. Now I only have a white belt and as of two weeks ago, earned my first stripe. There are a lot of warm-ups that you can implement them in your training, the moves you will do will help you to have memory recall training - knowing you can use them on the mat. A lot of drillings, rounds of sparring against others, and have fun developing friendships with others, it's a world of feeling as if you are part of a family...

Jiu Jitsu rocks!

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I'm a blue belt myself, but stopped quite a while ago. It's been close to over years? But, it's definitely fun in terms of quick thinking, adaptation and technique. Will you be doing Gi or No-Gi? I personally like Gi a lot better, but if you want to be a cage fighter or learn some street moves, No Gi is the way to go. And yes, mat burns are pretty standard and messed up fingers too if you do Gi.

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I personally like Gi a lot better, but if you want to be a cage fighter or learn some street moves, No Gi is the way to go.

This is one of the most debated subjects in BJJ. I'll always advocate everyone doing a mixture of gi & no-gi regardless of the intended application. Most of the best grapplers I know in MMA train at least some gi as it forces a slower more technical game and if you can escape from someones top control in a gi: it's comparably a piece of cake in no-gi ;-)

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