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Book's Level Up Your Life Battle Log


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The main point of this blog is going to be to track my progress with Steve's book: Level Up Your Life: How to Unlock Adventure and Happiness by Becoming the Hero of Your Own Story

 

I'll also log my workouts and food insights.

 

Right at the end of the first chapter is the following: So other than reading this book, do yourself a favor and don't collect any more underpants for the time being. As you are reading, don't be afraid to put it down and get started and come back to it as you find different paths along your journey.

 

So that's what I'm doing. I'm putting down the book and starting this log. In a way this is just repeating an old pattern, but I think that's ok, because it was a pattern that worked, for as long as I stuck with it. Of course, it would help if I can change the way I do things around here. Part of that is going to be social. I have sometimes felt alienated around here, and that's 95% my fault.

 

But now, here's a new thing (although I think I've tried variations of this in the past): I've thought a lot about having some kind of repository where I list the things that I think I should remember, and some kind of system to get me to review them from time to time.

 

I'm going to make one right here. I'll update this first post with the things I need to remember, and I'm adding a reminder to my calendar to review and update them regularly.

 

1. Read with your son in the modified way.

2. Be active. The more people see you, the more likely they'll interact back with you.

3. Be positive. Listen to that voice that is telling you that you don't have to say that thing.

4. Finish character creation.

 

Steps taken to achieve goals (add these to posts later on):

Link to post

Chapter 4!

 

Origin story and alter ego.

 

This could be challenging. Let's start with the easy part, the origin story:

 

By day...

Jamie is a pretty ordinary 21st century middle-class (and middle-aged! :hororr:  ) man. He works at a 9-5 job for a major corporation. The job provides him with much-desired flexibility and some fun challenges, as well as a large dose of the inefficiencies and frustrations that accompany such a job. He has two children from a failed marriage. He has some poor eating habits (mostly binge and emotional eating). He sometimes misses out on things due to procrastination. His romantic relationships seem to have a shelf-life of 2-5 years. He is an introvert who sometimes self-sabotages good social situations.

 

By night...

TBD (And isn't that just perfect in this situation?)

Link to post

And... in less exciting updates, here's yesterday's workout:

 

Barbell Bench Press (done at home in the evening):
  • 55 lb x 10 reps
  • 135 lb x 5 reps
  • 185 lb x 5 reps
  • 185 lb x 5 reps
  • 185 lb x 5 reps
  • 205 lb x 3 reps
  • 225 lb x 2 reps
  • 235 lb x 1 reps

 

Done at work (I'm just getting back into doing this kind of thing):

  • Two-Arm Kettlebell Swing
    • 55 lb x 15 reps
    • 55 lb x 20 reps
  • One-Arm Kettlebell Clean
    • 55 lb x 14 reps
    • 55 lb x 20 reps
Link to post

And here's something I want to do to become the kind of superhero I want to be:

 

For my ADD-diagnosed son, who has a lot of troubles with reading, principally in retaining anything about the story, I want to change the way we read together. Right now I am a very typical parent (or so I read) where I get frustrated and I say things which are almost certainly not helpful, such as, "You aren't focusing." "Pay attention!" etc. I know these erode at his confidence, which only makes the situation worse.

 

So, what we are going to do instead is when we read together, I will ask a question that I think he should be able to answer. I will let him give his answer (right now I sometimes stop him because I can tell he's off in the wrong direction) and when he's right, which often happens, I'll praise him. When he isn't right, I won't keep driving him to the right answer, I'll just give him my interpretation and move on.

 

Maybe, maybe we'll handle his other day-to-day issues in a similar way.

Link to post

And here's something I want to do to become the kind of superhero I want to be:

 

For my ADD-diagnosed son, who has a lot of troubles with reading, principally in retaining anything about the story, I want to change the way we read together. Right now I am a very typical parent (or so I read) where I get frustrated and I say things which are almost certainly not helpful, such as, "You aren't focusing." "Pay attention!" etc. I know these erode at his confidence, which only makes the situation worse.

 

So, what we are going to do instead is when we read together, I will ask a question that I think he should be able to answer. I will let him give his answer (right now I sometimes stop him because I can tell he's off in the wrong direction) and when he's right, which often happens, I'll praise him. When he isn't right, I won't keep driving him to the right answer, I'll just give him my interpretation and move on.

 

Maybe, maybe we'll handle his other day-to-day issues in a similar way.

 

Success! Tried it tonight, and his confidence level soared. And I think he got a lot more things on his own because of it. I'm excited to continue.

Link to post

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