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ladymorella

Backpacking foods

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So I have been wanting to go backpacking for a while. I just planned my first backpacking trip with a friend which will be about a 4 day trek. So suddenly I realized I have to pack food for said trip. I can't have wheat, peanuts, almonds, eggs, and a few other things so I can't rely on buying some dehydrated food pouches. Suddenly I am freaking out a bit. Originally I planned on slowly upping the amount of nights I stayed out so I wouldn't have to go through this, but it didn't work out.

 

What do you guys use for protein on the trail? I am currently on a low carb diet to lose weight, but I am not opposed to ditching that for the trip. I figure some protein is still a good idea though. Do you guys rely on pouches with dehydrated meat? Jerky? Tuna pouches only? Or mostly nuts?

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Hey,

I've done a few multi-day hikes and recommend taking food you'll enjoy after walking for hours. There is no fun getting to the end of an amazing day and eating pretzels and dried fruit for your meal (unless that's your thing). I couldn't do low carb I'd tired and grumpy and stop enjoying it.

 

jerky and tuna pouches are fine. Also in that vain is salami. Your pack will keep things insulated for a day or 2 so you can usually have fresh food for those meals.

 

Also remember that if you're out all day you'll need to keep sodium up. A friend of mine got very low electrolytes from trying to eat too healthy while hiking, it wasn't fun.

 

But most off all make sure you will enjoy the food, it really makes the end of a day great.

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Protein sources for me on the trail: Jerky, tuna and salmon pounches, powdered eggs (whole ones will keep 4 days if in a carrier to not break), spam pouches, and bagged chicken.  ALso ground beef dehydrated at home rehydrates pretty well, especially spicy like chili or taco meat.  Nuts are more fat source than being all that great at protein. Low fat Seafood like shrimp dehdrates well to make ramen higher protien.  I also have made a mix of fake crab and cream cheese to roll up in a tortilla for a filling no cook lunch.

 

I will loosen up dieting even during a hard cut for a trip.  At 150# I still had a 6000+ calorie burn day on a trail by HRM.  I tend to eat pretty carby on the trail with lots of noodle dishes, typically from the dry goods at the grocery store rather than specialty trail food. 

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Scrambled eggs frozen in a plastic water bottle will keep for a day or two depending on the weather. There are shelf stable pouches of ground hamburger available. You could mix that with GF noodles and tomato paste(The tube kind packs well) for a trail pasta. I've done that but with regular noodles.

The curry that comes in blocks, like the golden curry  packs well. You can use the pouches of chicken, then add dehydrated vegetables to it. You can purchase all sorts of veggies that are freeze dried, even on Amazon.

Rice crackers & tuna pouches. Starkist makes several tasty flavors of tuna pouches. Grape tomatoes don't like being refrigerated so they go on trips well as long as they are in a hard container.

Backpacker's pantry has several meals that seem GF. I have a friend that is gluten intolerant and allergic to peanuts. She eats the red beans & rice one often. She also likes the Katmandu curry one.

 

Are you guys going in an area where you need to use bear bags? Most of that stuff will pack decently in a bear container, just make sure you keep the meat wrappers in the bear container after you eat the meat.

 

There are some good recipes on here that you might could use.

http://www.backpackingchef.com/

If you've never been before, a 4 day trek is a heck of a start, add in going with foods you're not sure about, & it could be rough!  I hope you find some good meal options.

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Hey,

I've done a few multi-day hikes and recommend taking food you'll enjoy after walking for hours. There is no fun getting to the end of an amazing day and eating pretzels and dried fruit for your meal (unless that's your thing). I couldn't do low carb I'd tired and grumpy and stop enjoying it.

 

jerky and tuna pouches are fine. Also in that vain is salami. Your pack will keep things insulated for a day or 2 so you can usually have fresh food for those meals.

 

Also remember that if you're out all day you'll need to keep sodium up. A friend of mine got very low electrolytes from trying to eat too healthy while hiking, it wasn't fun.

 

But most off all make sure you will enjoy the food, it really makes the end of a day great.

Yeah, good point. I have made that mistake with day hikes. I get to the summit of a mountain only to realize I want none of the food in my pack. The sodium is a good reminder. I rarely add salt to my food and I have a problem with electrolytes when I cook for myself and it isn't from a recipe.

 

Protein sources for me on the trail: Jerky, tuna and salmon pounches, powdered eggs (whole ones will keep 4 days if in a carrier to not break), spam pouches, and bagged chicken.  ALso ground beef dehydrated at home rehydrates pretty well, especially spicy like chili or taco meat.  Nuts are more fat source than being all that great at protein. Low fat Seafood like shrimp dehdrates well to make ramen higher protien.  I also have made a mix of fake crab and cream cheese to roll up in a tortilla for a filling no cook lunch.

 

I will loosen up dieting even during a hard cut for a trip.  At 150# I still had a 6000+ calorie burn day on a trail by HRM.  I tend to eat pretty carby on the trail with lots of noodle dishes, typically from the dry goods at the grocery store rather than specialty trail food. 

I like those protein ideas. I wonder if I know anyone with a dehydrator I could borrow. I eat pretty carb heavy on the trail too, but I figure some fat and protein would be a good idea.

 

Scrambled eggs frozen in a plastic water bottle will keep for a day or two depending on the weather. There are shelf stable pouches of ground hamburger available. You could mix that with GF noodles and tomato paste(The tube kind packs well) for a trail pasta. I've done that but with regular noodles.

The curry that comes in blocks, like the golden curry  packs well. You can use the pouches of chicken, then add dehydrated vegetables to it. You can purchase all sorts of veggies that are freeze dried, even on Amazon.

Rice crackers & tuna pouches. Starkist makes several tasty flavors of tuna pouches. Grape tomatoes don't like being refrigerated so they go on trips well as long as they are in a hard container.

Backpacker's pantry has several meals that seem GF. I have a friend that is gluten intolerant and allergic to peanuts. She eats the red beans & rice one often. She also likes the Katmandu curry one.

 

Are you guys going in an area where you need to use bear bags? Most of that stuff will pack decently in a bear container, just make sure you keep the meat wrappers in the bear container after you eat the meat.

 

There are some good recipes on here that you might could use.

http://www.backpackingchef.com/

If you've never been before, a 4 day trek is a heck of a start, add in going with foods you're not sure about, & it could be rough!  I hope you find some good meal options.

Oh yeah, I can't have eggs either. :-( The rest is all good though. It looks like there are food storage boxes at the campsites we can use. I'll have to check out the link later.

4 day is a heck of a start. Last year was a bit of a sucker punch, so I didn't get a chance to ease into it. The trail looks alright. My friend knows my skill so I think I should be ok. I do suspect I will have to suffer through it some. The food thing is concerning to me, but I think it will be fun.

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You can get Tuna or Chicken pouches, which are good. Jerky. You may want to invest in a dehydrator. I got one from my brother, and have made Jerky and Dried apples. The dried apples are great!!!

 

My brother-in-law and I pack out a pack of Bratwurst the first night, and cook them over the fire. I wouldn't pack them more that one day, but that first night, it's kind of our tradition.

 

Allergies can be tricky to buy for, you almost have to make it your self. That's why I like the dehydrator, you know exactly what's in it. There are many recipes for 'fruit leather', including a pumpkin pie fruit leather. You can dehydrate sauce, and many other things. Bing.com is your friend!

 

I didn't see Oatmeal in your list to avoid, so that's a great option for breakfasts. Heat up a little water and you're good to go. I use a little Esbit stove, and it heats enough water to make oatmeal and a hot drink (tea/hot chocolate/etc.). And then it's ready to pack a few minutes later.

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You can get Tuna or Chicken pouches, which are good. Jerky. You may want to invest in a dehydrator. I got one from my brother, and have made Jerky and Dried apples. The dried apples are great!!!

 

My brother-in-law and I pack out a pack of Bratwurst the first night, and cook them over the fire. I wouldn't pack them more that one day, but that first night, it's kind of our tradition.

 

Allergies can be tricky to buy for, you almost have to make it your self. That's why I like the dehydrator, you know exactly what's in it. There are many recipes for 'fruit leather', including a pumpkin pie fruit leather. You can dehydrate sauce, and many other things. Bing.com is your friend!

 

I didn't see Oatmeal in your list to avoid, so that's a great option for breakfasts. Heat up a little water and you're good to go. I use a little Esbit stove, and it heats enough water to make oatmeal and a hot drink (tea/hot chocolate/etc.). And then it's ready to pack a few minutes later.

Yeah I think if I keep this up I will invest in a dehydrator. However I really don't want to get into that right now. I think I will have to rely on oatmeal and rice. I found some quick steel cut oats so that will help make it better. I don't like the texture of oatmeal, but steel cut is fine. I will need to the store and buy some minute rice. A piece of me will die in doing so, but it is for a good reason. Haha!

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I almost forgot cheese!

 

Harder cheeses are pretty shelf stable for the length of most folks trips.  For added safety and ease I often get some individually wrapped colby jack and chedder hunks.  Like nuts these tend to be more fat than protein.  bacon and cheese instant grits isn't a terrible way to start the day either. 

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I almost forgot cheese!

 

Harder cheeses are pretty shelf stable for the length of most folks trips.  For added safety and ease I often get some individually wrapped colby jack and chedder hunks.  Like nuts these tend to be more fat than protein.  bacon and cheese instant grits isn't a terrible way to start the day either. 

Oh man bacon and cheese grits sounds awesome!! Cheese is a good idea.

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I almost forgot cheese!

 

Harder cheeses are pretty shelf stable for the length of most folks trips.  For added safety and ease I often get some individually wrapped colby jack and chedder hunks.  Like nuts these tend to be more fat than protein.  bacon and cheese instant grits isn't a terrible way to start the day either. 

Oh man, I tried bacon and cheese grits and they are pretty amazing. Pretty quick to make too. I think I found a new breakfast food for every day food too.

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My sister took me backpacking (short, 2-night trip) 2 summers ago. She's GF, and the first night we had quesadillas! the corn tortillas packed easily, cheese is a no-brainer, and eating the can of black beans the first night made for lighter packing the days after. 

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Refried bean and cheese burrito is also good.  On a longer trip or trying to really cut weight refried beans actually dehydrate and rehydrate pretty well. Of course with a larger group walking single file it can be a problem to those in the back of the line. 

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