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Blue Collar Nerd

Tips on injury prevention

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Hey guys.

I have been running and find the outside of my left foot hurts after walk/jogging for a few minutes. So Im wondering if anyone has any suggestions on how to avoid that.

Also I have had a few low back injuries in the past and so I tend to hurt it easily. After running (too much too soon I'll admit) I am extremely sore today and finding it painful to bend or lift. I am wondering what I can do to build the strength in my back?

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Need some more info I think

 

When was the last time you got new shoes?

 

Have you been to a running store and been properly fitted for shoes?

 

Did you try running too fast?

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Hey.

My shoes are pretty new, I have only had them a couple months and they are still in great condition.

I'm wearing a set of Nike Airs (I think) so they are probably not the best shoes in the world but they are what I can afford right now and are definetely better than the cheap runners I had before.

When I bought them I was sized and they do feel like they fit well and are comfortable, enough space in the toe box (which is rare for me to find since most women don't have wide feet/splayed toes apparently) and no foot movement/sliding in the heel.

I was lightly jogging when the pain started, my walking pace on the treadmill is about 3.6 and I was only at 5.3. I jogged through it for a while and when I quit it hurt for a little while but stopped after about a half hour of rest.

I am wondering if it is something like underpronation (I know that's not the right word for it but I'm tired) or something related to the way I walk?

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Hey.

My shoes are pretty new, I have only had them a couple months and they are still in great condition.

I'm wearing a set of Nike Airs (I think) so they are probably not the best shoes in the world but they are what I can afford right now and are definetely better than the cheap runners I had before.

When I bought them I was sized and they do feel like they fit well and are comfortable, enough space in the toe box (which is rare for me to find since most women don't have wide feet/splayed toes apparently) and no foot movement/sliding in the heel.

I was lightly jogging when the pain started, my walking pace on the treadmill is about 3.6 and I was only at 5.3. I jogged through it for a while and when I quit it hurt for a little while but stopped after about a half hour of rest.

I am wondering if it is something like underpronation (I know that's not the right word for it but I'm tired) or something related to the way I walk?

This post is a bit old, but I thought I'd throw in here...

 

The amount of factors that can play in a running injury are pretty staggering, but the cause for most running injuries seems to be poor running form rather than poor running shoes. (Shoes can certainly play a factor, but with proper form you can run pain-free even in poorly-cushioned dress shoes if you choose.)

 

In short, if you heel-strike, you are short-circuiting the natural shock-absorption mechanism in your knees and achilles tendons. This can cause the pronation issues you're wondering about and even radiate upward into your back. This is, unfortunately, the way modern running shoes encourage us to run, and it's a habit that can be hard to break.

 

I'm a big advocate for barefoot running. It can be a little bit extreme for somebody just starting out, but running barefoot (even on a treadmill!) will quickly expose the flaws in your form. Aim for a midfoot strike. Bend your knees. Stand up straight. You'll do fine.

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Hey just thought I'd share something that worked for me. I had a really old pair of shoes that I used for running and never had any extra foot or leg pain. But when I got a brand new pair this year I started having really painful calves and hip pain (especially on the left leg). 

I did some research and according to a few people there has been a new trend in running shoes to drop the heel padding a tiny amount (don't know if this is really true or not, but I read it on the internet!) But what I did was went out and got some thin heel inserts. That immediately helped out with my leg pain. 

 

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12 hours ago, XyonsWrath said:

Hey just thought I'd share something that worked for me. I had a really old pair of shoes that I used for running and never had any extra foot or leg pain. But when I got a brand new pair this year I started having really painful calves and hip pain (especially on the left leg). 

I did some research and according to a few people there has been a new trend in running shoes to drop the heel padding a tiny amount (don't know if this is really true or not, but I read it on the internet!) But what I did was went out and got some thin heel inserts. That immediately helped out with my leg pain. 

 

 

In recent years, there have been competing trends toward minimalism (less heel elevation, less cushion) and maximalism (duh, more cushion). This layperson's anecdotal evidence is that when you mess with the thing you've been doing your whole life, you will end up with some discomfort. For most of us, I think (and certainly for me), that was tennis shoes with a not-insignificant heel drop. When I transitioned to minimalist shoes, I ended up with alternating pains in the achilles and heels of both feet. I tried heel inserts and different shoes and all sorts of things, with intermittent and unreliable results. Now, a couple of years later, that pain seems like it's finally abating (possibly because those dormant muscles are finally reaching a decent level of conditioning).

 

FWIW, I run almost exclusively in my Vibram FiveFingers these days, with virtually no cushioning and no heel drop. It's not been an easy road to get here, but I am enjoying my runs more and more every day. On the other hand, when I have a lapse in judgment and put on some of my more "traditional" sneakers, even just for walking around for a few hours, my feet start to feel closed in and uncomfortable before too long.

 

I still don't know where I come down, really. I think the minimalist approach is probably objectively better, especially if you can start young. But if you're over 30, I might trend more toward the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" school of thought when it comes to shoes. Ultimately, though, running still sees a ridiculous rate of injury, so really, who the fargo knows anything at all?

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I tend to change up shoes from run to run to avoid repetitive motion injuries. For my long runs I run in a heavily cushioned New Balance 1080s with an 8mm drop. My feet are beat up from when I was overweight and had diabetes and neuropathy and get numb on the long run. On my normal days I alternate Zero Drop Altras with 4mm drop Saucony Kinvaras. In between I squeeze in some shorter runs with VFFs. When you change up shoe types you work different muscles differently and it aids in injury prevention ( From Jason Fitzgerald Strengthrunning.com ).

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I have real problems with my left ankle and both knees after a couple of bad falling-off-a-horse incidents. Every time I tried to get into running, the pain would come back and I'd have to give up after a week. I can't run on concrete, it has to be grass. Never tried a track. I changed my running style so that my heels just barely touch the floor. It makes for a slow, springy run but I'm working more for endurance than speed right now.

 I'm also running in crappy, broken old trainers because these are the ones I plan on wearing for my Muddy 5k. I'm using Darebee's couch to 5k program. I've never used a program before but I'm now one the 19th day. 19th! I find even though every now and then my worst knee will twinge a little, and I need a little longer to warm up in the mornings, there's no concerning amount of pain.

  Learning how to run properly, then starting right from square one, with a gentle but progressive routine has done wonders. I ran 3 sets of 4 minutes today, whereas 3 weeks ago I couldn't run for 1 minute full stop. It doesn't look like a lot of progress when I type it, but it feels like I'm an olympic runner, considering I thought I'd never be able to run.

Learn your limits and your restrictions. If I'd tried this on pavements I'd have had to given up. I'll never run a proper race, but that was never my goal.

 

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I have not read all the replies yet, but my first question is about your shoes.  How long have you had them?  Did you get your feet professionally fitted at a specialty running store?  Most foot problems stem from your shoes.  It really does pay off to invest in a good pair, and what is good for you may not be what is good for somebody else.  Another bonus with this is that decent shoes can also alleviate some causes of back pain, because your stride won't be off.

 

As for your back, back problems are common with runners, because we tend to have a weak core.  Situps help, because your abdominal muscles counter-balance your back muscles.  If you try situps, though, and they don't seem to be helping after a week or two, or if they seem to make your back even worse, definitely see a doctor, preferably one who specializes in sports medicine.

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On 3/14/2016 at 5:48 PM, Blue Collar Nerd said:

I was lightly jogging when the pain started, my walking pace on the treadmill is about 3.6 and I was only at 5.3. I jogged through it for a while and when I quit it hurt for a little while but stopped after about a half hour of rest.

1) Is your treadmill on an incline?  I have found that I need to set my incline to 2 in order to prevent injuries.

2) If you start feeling pain, stop immediately. Working through it almost always makes it worse.  Soreness you can work through.  Pain is a warning signal from your body.

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On 3/14/2016 at 1:38 PM, Blue Collar Nerd said:

Hey guys.

I have been running and find the outside of my left foot hurts after walk/jogging for a few minutes. So Im wondering if anyone has any suggestions on how to avoid that.

Also I have had a few low back injuries in the past and so I tend to hurt it easily. After running (too much too soon I'll admit) I am extremely sore today and finding it painful to bend or lift. I am wondering what I can do to build the strength in my back?

Your shoes are too narrow for your feet. Seriously, this is the answer. You need a slightly wider type of shoe. 

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