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Monk Introductory Thread!

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I think I need a bit more time before I try group class! The very mention of high-pressure and ugly martial arts practice sends my blood pressure soaring!

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Hey everybody, new member here.

 

I've been doing martial arts on and off for about 3 years.  My school's main focus is Siu-Lum Hung Kuen (Hung-Ga Kung Fu), though we also practice some kickboxing and grappling as it applies to more real world self defense situations. I'm currently on my yellow sash (Second level, third if you include introductory students) and am really trying to get back into a regular routine of going to class and advance myself.  I've had issues in the past of missing classes, and those absences chaining together so that I'm suddenly realizing I haven't attended a class in over a month, which is the main thing I'm focusing on correcting right now.  As anyone who takes martial arts classes can attest, those long periods of absence stunt your growth, and make it that much harder when you try to return to class, only to realize you're flexibility and conditioning are all gone lol.

 

Looking forward to getting to know everyone here and exchanging some training ideas and knowledge.

 

-AJ

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Just realized Ibe been in the community like a year and never introduced myself, oops... 

Well hello fellow monks, when I was younger I had a rather active outdoorsy lifestyle, in boy scouts, running around my grandparents forests (both sets lived in the woods it was great) and my brother and I would beat on each other with sticks in a misguided attempt at "kendo" it was not real kendo whatsoever, but what did two country kids know, anyhoo. I really didn't get into physical culture until high school when I started going to the gym, I wasn't too sure what to do or why I was there, maybe I thought of I put on some muscle I'd be more confident and the sports kids wouldn't mess with me. After two years of spastic, and undisciplined workouts I found martial arts. It was actually an anime that I found that convinced me that just regular people do martial arts, not just Bruce Lee, or Mr. Miagi type masters, but average Joe's and Jane's can too. So I dove into the Google and found as much info as I could on home training, it was a little rough those early times, just my brother and I making close approximations of Muay Thai and Savate, but we made it work. After I graduated high school, we trained like mad that summer with a friend whof had actual training in hung gar Kung fu. These made a decent foundation for when I went to college and found my taekwondo master. 3.5 years, gallons of sweat, and hours upon hours of training both in classes and alone( or with a partner). I got my first Dan in taekwondo through the world taekwondo federation. I'm still training with that master too, at least until may when I graduate and have to move away. 

Besides taekwondo, this pervious summer (2017) I went to train in hung gar Kung fu with the sifu of the friend who helped with my foundational training. That added a nice new perspective on balance and power development. It was really hard not to kick high, but adaptation is important and I eventually got it. After school I'm planning on training wherever I can. My tkd grandmaster (my master's master) has a school near my home so I might go there. 

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Wicked thread idea.  

 

I began studying a mixed variation of Okinawan Karate while growing up in Okinawa.  For the briefest stint as a teen, I attempted to learn Shotokan before some health issues took over.  Eventually, I got bored, and came back martial arts to study Ho Kuk Mu Sul (think Kuk Sul Won style, including Hapkido techniques) and a tiny bit of Yang-style Taichi. I then branched off into American TKD Moo Duk Kwan, kickboxing, and boxing.

 

At this point, I'm leaving heavily toward starting Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.  It's totally outside of my comfort zone.  Always open to suggestions, too!

 

Kudos on your journeys!

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Hi, 

 

I live in California with my wife. I'm a production assistant and lover of martial arts. My favorite thing to do is leg lock people.

 

I began martial arts when I was five years old with Shotokan out of my parents' garage. My dad holds a black belt and taught my older sister and I a few things. My first formal training was with Aikido at a youth center when I was seven. When I was eleven, I got suckered into a total McDojo Koga Ninjutsu program at that same youth center. When I was 15, I did WTF Tae Kwon Do. I did that for maybe five years. Then I did a few months of Wado-Ryu Karate when I was 25.  I joined a MMA gym learning Muay Thai and Jiu-Jitsu a year later.  I had a few setbacks, but I've pretty much stuck with that ever since with a much heavier influence on Jiu-Jitsu than Muay Thai now. 

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Hi!

 

I don't have much of a story yet; I've only been a martial arts practitioner for about three weeks.

 

I've always been attracted by martial arts, and I did two belts' worth of TKD when I was about 7. After college, I learned about MMA and Muay Thai, and have been wanting to try one of them for years. I moved out to Chicago, about two or three years ago, and one of my coworkers told me that there was an MMA gym, about 20 minutes from where I work. I'm 29 now, and, I've finally buckled down and started Muay Thai classes. The classes are pretty small format, so I get to have close contact with my coach and sparring mates. I've found that I like taking hits, so far! It builds up my adrenaline, gets my blood pumping, and makes me want to keep coming back.

 

I'm so excited to have started, and I don't think this is going to be a short term commitment. I just hope I'm not too old to get to a point where I feel good enough at the sport!

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Hi Angor, never too late! I started 3 years ago and turn 40 in July, it's the best thing I've ever done - even with injuries and all sorts, I love it. Just go at your own pace and compare progress with yourself, not with other people who have different bodies and commitments :-)

Have fun!

~A

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I don't know if I am a monk or not but my son asked me to do Taekwondo with him and I'll never pass up a chance to spend time with my kids so I'm going for it. The sticker price on all that gear was a bit of a shock but what the hell. I went to my first class and I didn't do horrible but since then I have had to travel for work. I have been practicing with the online videos though. We originally enrolled him because they had an anti-bullying program and he was struggling with some of his class mates so I completely understand that aspect of it and at 45 I also have some age concerns.  

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I wanted to get into martial arts for as long as I can remember. I remember asking about it when I was in sixth grade. At the time, my stepfather was around, and he was a jerk who wouldn't let me do a damn thing...including have any measurable sense of self-esteem, but that's a conversation for my therapist. LOL I asked my mom and stepfather if I could take karate, and he said no. So if he said no, that meant my mom did too.

 

Time passed. When I was a senior in high school, my mom and stepdad signed up for some kind of introductory package that our cable company was offering, where we could get both HBO and Cinemax for a discounted rate for a couple months. The first night we had it, Cinemax played three of Bruce Lee's films:

 

THE BIG BOSS (aka FISTS OF FURY)

FIST OF FURY (aka THE CHINESE CONNECTION, renamed because it came out around the same time as THE FRENCH CONNECTION and, for some reason, movie producers thought the public would get fooled into thinking the movies were similar!)

WAY OF THE DRAGON (aka RETURN OF THE DRAGON, because in some countries it got released after ENTER THE DRAGON so, once again, movie moguls thought they could trick people into thinking this was a sequel to ENTER)

 

My desire to enroll in a martial art was immediately reborn. I asked again, and this time there was no resistance. Either Mom had regained some of her spine, or my stepfather just cared less about what I did as long as I was out of his hair. Maybe it was a combination of both. At any rate, I wound up enrolling in a Judo school because it was conveniently located less than 3 miles from my house. I attended the school for about six months, but the head Sensei's attitude started to grate on me. Sometimes after class, he would give us all a little speech where he would bash other styles. On top of this, I didn't like the fact that the school was so tournament-based.

 

At this time I was doing a lot more reading up on Bruce Lee. I discovered his art of Jeet Kune Do, and I wanted to take it. At the time there were no schools for it in my area. However, I learned that he started with Wing Chun Kung Fu, and there was a school for that in Albany. Mom drove me around looking for it, but it was impossible to find. We came across another martial arts school instead, which was called the Capital District Tai Chi and Kung Fu Association. I decided to check it out, and I joined it. It was a decent school, although they taught mostly flashy and acrobatic moves, almost like Wushu instead of Kung Fu. It really wasn't what I wanted to do, and my interest waned.

 

Then, wouldn't you know it? One time my mom and I were driving down Central Avenue in Albany, and BOOM! There it is, plain as day: a giant sign reading WING CHUN!!! I stopped in to see when class times were (they weren't open when we drove by), and planned to visit them when they had their next class.

 

Most martial arts schools will let a newbie have a free trial class, to see if they like the art. However, this school just let you watch. I thought this was odd, but I liked what I saw so I didn't complain. I came back the next night, and I joined it, and the rest is history. This was in January 1995. Due to a lot of other issues that have gone on over the years, my attendance has been on and off, but even when I am not there, I am always either training or THINKING about training.

 

What has martial arts given me? Well, another passion for one thing. It also gave me a little bit of a self-esteem boost, because I knew I could handle myself if there was ever a physical altercation. (It took many years of growing and changing in other ways to REALLY build a noticeable sense of self-esteem and self-worth, but it did all begin with Wing Chun.) Also, Wing Chun has taught me that the lessons I learned in class can be applied to more than just kicking butt. For example, Wing Chun focuses on speed, sensitivity, and relaxation more than strength. You must be relaxed in order to react properly. I've learned how to apply this to handling problems in other areas of life because if you are tense and wound up and stressed (mentally), then you cannot respond properly to any challenge. And in my life, I have plenty of them. I have 4 kids by 3 different women, so that right there should tell you at any given moment I can have MORE than enough stress to handle. And yet by remaining calm, relaxed, and level-headed, I come out victorious.

 

And that, my friends, is my story.

 

 

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Hello, everyone. I'm a full-contact Karate practitioner from Victoria, BC. My style is called Seienjuku, which is an off-shoot of Yoshukai.

 

I've been involved in martial arts, in some capacity, most of my life. I started my training in the Korean hybrid-style of Hap Do Sool when I was in my teens, but had to quit when I moved away. I've dabbled in other martial arts over the years, but could not commit due to a variety of reasons.

 

I've been diligently training at my current Dojo for the last four years. I'm currently a brown belt, and I'm working very hard towards my black.

 

I'm looking forward to meeting other Monks here. I love to discuss all aspects of the martial arts. Training is my way of life.

 

Osu!

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Hi,

I have always been fascinated with martial arts. I was never really the tough guy. Getting into a fight scares me. I started studying martial arts so I wouldn't be afraid to defend myself or someone else. As I got older, I fell away from studying. I came back my first year of college. I studied BJJ and boxing. A shoulder injury put me on the shelf for a while. I came back studying Kenpo and Krav Maga and I haven't looked back.

I love the philosophies of martial arts. Martial arts have helped me to know myself on a deeper level. I look forward to the day that I can give back to martial arts. I hope to one day open up my own Kenpo school.

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On ‎7‎/‎31‎/‎2018 at 8:30 PM, reallifeDEKU said:

Hi,

I have always been fascinated with martial arts. I was never really the tough guy. Getting into a fight scares me. I started studying martial arts so I wouldn't be afraid to defend myself or someone else. As I got older, I fell away from studying. I came back my first year of college. I studied BJJ and boxing. A shoulder injury put me on the shelf for a while. I came back studying Kenpo and Krav Maga and I haven't looked back.

I love the philosophies of martial arts. Martial arts have helped me to know myself on a deeper level. I look forward to the day that I can give back to martial arts. I hope to one day open up my own Kenpo school.

 

I hear you about being scared of fights. I found out the only way to get over it was to get hit! I experienced this a little bit in my Wing Chun class when we did Chi Sao (too complicated to explain, just look up videos of it on YouTube), but those are all short-range shots. I decided to join a boxing gym where some people can REALLY wail on you, as well as starting a free martial arts training group where I spar with people from all different styles. Believe me: getting punched during Chi Sao is NOTHING like when a Tae Kwon Do guy hits you with a roundhouse kick they brought all the way from Georgia!

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Hi!

I am a monk wannabe... I have no training whatsoever in MA. I did capoeira as a teenager for about 6 months and that was it. I am however leaning towards starting Tae Kwon Do/Hapkido classes! I go there tomorrow to try it out!

 

I wrote a long thread asking for advice before seeing this intro thread... so I apologize. Here it is if anyone is interested!

 

Cheers!

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Hi Everyone!

 

I'm retired military so I have some experience and training in MAC (modern army combatives - think MMA for the Army), but my current martial arts focus is HEMA (Historical European Martial Arts), specifically Late 14th-16th Century Italian historical fencing: longsword, dagger, sidesword, sidesword and dagger, sidesword and buckler, etc. I work primarily out of Fiore dei Liberi's Fior di Battaglia (longsword, rondel dagger, clinch fighting/grappling), Giovanni dall'Agocchie's  Dell'Arte di Scrima Libri Tre, and Angelo Viggiani's Lo Schermo (sidesword). I've been doing it for three years now, and train twice a week with my HEMA Club, Boston Armizare. It's a lot of fun and has helps keep me active! Plus I get to have a lot of swords. :)

Adrian

"I am the sword, deadly against all weapons. Neither spear, nor poleaxe, nor dagger can prevail against me. I can be used at long range or close range, or I can be held in the half sword grip and move to the Narrow Game. I can be used to take away the opponent’s sword, or move to grapple. My skill lies in breaking and binding. I am also skilled in covering and striking, with which I seek always to finish the fight. I will crush anyone who opposes me. I am of royal blood. I dispense justice, advance the cause of good and destroy evil. To those who learn my crossings I will grant great fame and renown in the art of armed fighting." -Fiore Furlano de’i Liberi de Cividale d’Austria, 1404.

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Hi all. I'm sort of new here. I was active on Nerd Fitness a few years ago, then I stopped coming, but I'm here to give it another go. 

 

I'm a judo practitioner. I'm 32 years old and I've been training in judo for over 10 years now. I've also been coaching kids for about five to six years years and I've been coaching teenagers and adults for over two years now. I hold a brown belt and am hoping to receive my first degree black belt (shodan) this year. I have also trained in wing chun kung fu for nearly three years, but stopped shortly after receiving my red sash (going from no sash, to yellow and then red). I stopped because at the time, I had simply too much going on! I was working full time, trying to go to the gym five days a week, judo three times a week and wing chun twice a week. In the end, it got too much, so I decided to cut things down. 

 

I started judo at the beginning of 2009, because shortly before I started, I was at a friend's birthday party and was assaulted by two, big drunk guys. I wasn't seriously injured, but it left me feeling helpless, humiliated and scared. I was terrified to go out into public, out of fear that I would run into one, or both of those men again. I decided to take up judo because I wanted to learn a self defence. At the time, I didn't have a job (little to no money) and I didn't have a car, let alone my driver's license, so I tried judo because it was close to my home and quite cheap. 

 

At the time, I was also severely overweight. While I am tall (6'3), I was quite heavy, weighing 132kg (just over 291 Ibs), I did no exercise, ate a lot of junk food and drank heavily on weekends. When I arrived to my first judo session, it was so scary, because everyone looked so fit and tough. I felt so out of place and the training itself was so hard. By the end of the session (an hour and a half), I was apparently as pale as a ghost. 

 

When I went home, my body was so sore, especially the next day and I wanted to quit so bad. But I didn't quit, I felt if I did quit, then those guys, the ones who beat me up? I felt they would be "winning", so I decided to keep training. 

 

Two weeks into my training, only just attending four, one and a half hour sessions, I had lost 6kg (about 13 Ibs) in weight. I was amazed, because in my entire life, I had never lost weight. My goal changed, it was no longer to learn self defence, it was to get healthy. 

 

I kept training but my weight eventually stopped dropping at 120kg (264 Ibs). I then began to change my food and eating habits, eating more fruits and vegetables, high fibre foods and less junk food. I still had junk food every day, but it was minimised to once a day. My weight began to drop again until it stopped at 110kg (242 Ibs). I then began to exercise more often, going to a nearby, public football field and doing laps of jogging and walking, doing sets up push ups, sit ups and squats after every lap. Eventually, I weighed 97kg (213 Ibs), dropping a total of 35kg (77 Ibs) in just nine months. 


I attended my first interstate judo competition, my first ever judo comp actually, and I got my arse kicked, but it was an eye opening experience and aside from the competition, I had a great time. I got a bronze medal by default, ha ha. Since then, I have competed at a state and national level, recently competing at the Australian Kodokan national championships in late 2019, receiving a gold medal in the men's -100kg division and a silver medal in the veteran men's +90kg divisions. I have also competed in a local Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu competition and while having no formal BJJ training, I received a silver medal and won four out of five fights. I am not an amazing, elite-level athlete, but I've done okay. 

 

Back then, I did not have the knowledge that I do now about strength and conditioning, as well as nutrition and weight loss, but I just did the things that felt "right" to me and it worked. Nowadays, I am at judo twice a week, both as a coach and as a trainee, I am at the gym four days a week exclusively for strength work, and I have a greater focus on nutrition. 

 

Just to clarify, I have never had to try and use judo for self defence since I got assaulted over 10 years ago, and I hope to never try. Judo itself could potentially be used as a self defence, as judo's techniques are derived from Japanese jujitsu, which of course comes from the violent history of the Japanese samurai but to tell you the truth, most judo clubs teach judo as a sport with rules and restrictions, not a self defence. In my experience, every judo club I've seen that claims to teach self defence is kind of lying, for the sake of advertising.

 

What judo can give you though, if you let it: 

 

- Commitment to goals; 

- Honesty to yourself and others;

- Respect for yourself and others;
- Politeness and humility

- Self discipline; 

- Mental and physical resilience; 

- Fitness - a clearer path to better health;

- Friendship and memories.

 

 

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