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McCain Steam Fresh veggies and tuna


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Hey again,

Quick question with the whole paleo concepts of food. Here in Australia (and possibly other places, I have no idea) a company called McCains do freezer bags of veggies, designed to microwave and eat. They're 120g of baby peas, carrots and corn kernals. (http://www.mccain.com.au/steam-fresh.aspx). One of these and a 95g tin of tuna - how is that for lunch?

Is this considered whole foods? Any suggestions on ways to improve?

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They say that frozen veggies can be better than fresh veggies (depending on the season -- off season produce is often picked too early and shipped way too far, losing nutrients as they travel), as they are frozen right after they are picked, thus preserving all the veggie goodness. The only thing that I would recommend is getting the veggie mix that does not include corn, as it is a grain, not a veggie, and I would steer clear of using a microwave, but that is because I don't trust using radiation (magic?) to cook things. I have read that microwave cooking destroys some of the nutrients.

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I'm not sure about the microwave hurting veggies, I've read an article that indicates it may actually be better than steaming them (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/02/dinin ... .html?_r=1). Of course, any news article not confirmed is not always the best source of information...

And re: the corn, in hindsight, it seems to obvious....

Thanks for the reply.

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Radiation isn't bad.

Microwaves just vibrate water molecules. Vibration = energy = heat = cooking

As to destroying nutrients. Every form of cooking destroys nutrients. By it's very nature the application of heat breaks chemical bonds and denatures proteins/long chain groups etc. Cooking also destroys a bunch of harmful bacteria as well though (e.g. Salmonella) This is one of the reason some people preach raw food diets. It really doesn't matter anyway, your body usually breaks it down into usable forms (catabolism) for both energy and biological precursors before it can use it for anabolic purposes. (This isn't gospel just what is thought to happen when something is not in a form the body can easily use.)

It should be fine Dave. The only thing is that it may not be enough. You may want two cans of tuna :) at least. The only other thing. Tuna and Vege gets boring really quickly. Think up some variations or you'll lose the mental battle.

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The radiation thing was partly a joke, partly some things I read. I try to be as old school as possible when cooking. Since most of my meals take 15 - 20 minutes to cook, including cutting the veggies/meat, I don't really see the need to cook that fast. Since I gave up processed foods, I don't really need a microwave.

Dantes is right about that getting boring quickly. You will need to find some other things to put into the rotation, or you will easily fall off the wagon with eating paleo. I usually cook a double portion of my dinner, and eat the rest for lunch the next day.

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It mainly depends on if you try to follow the spirit of paleo or the letter of paleo. Following the letter can get get very difficult and expensive at times.

yup. and if you want to follow it exactly, you've got to find a mix without the peas too (as they are a legume). all depends on how far you want to go.

i keep steamfresh broccoli and cans of tuna/cans of chicken at work for when i absolutely dont have time to go get fresh veggies and meats.

i went through a huge tuna phase until my dr advised me against eating canned tuna every day due to the mercury, though.

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One alternative I've had suggested to me for the tuna is canned salmon. They're harvested at a younger age, so they've absorbed less environmental mercury. Also, you can often buy it canned w/ skin & bones still in there. I know it sounds gross, but I've made salmon patties that way, and there's no issue with it, and you get all the good oils & nutrients from those parts.

This applies for the wild red salmon at least, not sure about the farmed/pink stuff. Most of them have some salt in them, but not anywhere near as much as your average processed food.

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