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Alaysia

New Warrior Training

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10 hours ago, Broba Fett said:

Oh some of the stories I could tell.  If there isn't a "dumbest thing you've seen in the gym" thread somewhere in the Warrior forum there should be.

 

There was one but it descended into being condescending and abusive so it was locked (and possibly deleted).

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Warrior's Log 1.4

 

Fitness: A recovery day, however I went to water aerobics with a friend and walked for half an hour on the treadmill waiting for her. I didn't think it would be a big deal except that class did wear me out. And they did resistance exercises, which I wasn't expecting. But it was a lot of fun.

 

Nutrition: 84g of protein!

 

LUML: Earned another 30 xp on Duolingo and leveled up to 8.

 

 

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6 hours ago, Captain Badass said:

Two things - first of all, my boyfriend is pescatarian, so I alternate between cooking fish and veggie dishes.

 

Unless I'm uncharacteristically hungry in the morning I can find eggs a bit rich, so on occasion I've made a very decadent Huevos Rancheros

 

I'm glad you're enjoying non-dieting. I am too!

 

That recipe looks really good. And I even have some soyrizo in the fridge right now. I do believe this will be in my stomach soon.

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1 hour ago, Alaysia said:

 

That recipe looks really good. And I even have some soyrizo in the fridge right now. I do believe this will be in my stomach soon.

 

I just put a bit of smoked paprika in the salsa. You won't miss the chorizo!

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Side note:

I'm reading Level Up Your Life and I'm supposed to envision my Level 50, yeah? So I think, "Man, to fit into my old clothes would be awesome!" But then, what if I can't fit into them because by Level 50 my body has changed due to lifting and I can't fit in those clothes for a great reason? Anybody have that happen to them? I know I'm not going to hulk out, but hopefully my shoulders, biceps, and thighs will stay big with muscle. And my booty. I have a big booty and I want to keep it and just make it strong with muscle (Crack walnuts between them cheeks, girl!).

Anyway, off to the gym. Have to go a little earlier than usual due to another appt. I promise myself I will not run away if there're more than 4 people in the weight area. I promise-promise.  A mini-challange. 

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44 minutes ago, Alaysia said:

Side note:

I'm reading Level Up Your Life and I'm supposed to envision my Level 50, yeah? So I think, "Man, to fit into my old clothes would be awesome!" But then, what if I can't fit into them because by Level 50 my body has changed due to lifting and I can't fit in those clothes for a great reason? Anybody have that happen to them? I know I'm not going to hulk out, but hopefully my shoulders, biceps, and thighs will stay big with muscle. And my booty. I have a big booty and I want to keep it and just make it strong with muscle (Crack walnuts between them cheeks, girl!).

Anyway, off to the gym. Have to go a little earlier than usual due to another appt. I promise myself I will not run away if there're more than 4 people in the weight area. I promise-promise.  A mini-challange. 

 

One thing that surprised me about reaching my goal weight was how I responded to a lot of my "goal clothes." I have a soft spot for fashion and love dressing up, but when I tried on my old stuff I found that I wasn't interested in the styles anymore! Sure there were a few pieces I was happy about, but for the most part - meh. Donation pile. (I even found myself mourning a swim suit that was no longer flattering BECAUSE I had lost weight.) 

 

I can't speak for bulking (too noob!) but my general understanding is that it doesn't happen by accident. And whatever does happen, you get to find new stuff that works for you! Wut wut!

 

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Warrior's Log 1.5

 

Fitness: I hit the gym, as I promised myself. But I have some questions.

  1. I think the water aerobics was a bad move. I barely made my last rep on squats at the same weight and reps I've been at since I started. I was shaking a bit coming up on the last one. I'm hoping it was not allowing a real recovery day that caused that. But then I walked over to where I keep my paper and pencil, wrote my numbers down, then started toward the bench where I do my push-ups when there was this twang in my inner right thigh, just a little posterior of wear a pant seam would run. It was deep, not painful, but I lost control of my leg. Like it wasn't responding to commands. So I waited a moment, took a couple of breaths and it was back online and I was able to walk just fine. Still no pain. About two hours later I started to feel the area where the twang happened. No pain, per se. It was just...very felt. Now, even more hours later, when I squat down to grab something I feel a pull. Please tell me I haven't snapped something inside me that is important!!
  2. When I do seated rows, I pulled 93.5# today. It was a mistake because I was totally flustered at the amount of people in the weight area and didn't check before I started. However, once I realized my mistake, I kept doing it for both sets. My brain automatically assumes that I must have screwed up if I didn't fail at such a big jump in weight. (It was hard. I had to pause a couple of times to finish, but I did finish) But let's say that I did it right, that my form was right, that I was pulling the right way, all that: Does it make sense that I can do so much weight with that particular exercise as opposed to only doing 45# on squats, 35# on deadlifts, and 5# on overhead dumbell presses? I do taxes for a living, so it's not like my day job is rolling up fire hoses or something.

Nutrition: 100 grams of protein! Woot!

 

LUML: another 30 xp on Duolingo and a few sections done in Rosetta Stone.

 

Edited to add: I looked it up and what I described matches the description I'm getting of a pulled groin muscle. If this is true, I am both proud of and offended by my first sport injury. But I'm mainly concerned with what I can do now....

Edited by Alaysia

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7 hours ago, Alaysia said:

 

  1. When I do seated rows, I pulled 93.5# today. It was a mistake because I was totally flustered at the amount of people in the weight area and didn't check before I started. However, once I realized my mistake, I kept doing it for both sets. My brain automatically assumes that I must have screwed up if I didn't fail at such a big jump in weight. (It was hard. I had to pause a couple of times to finish, but I did finish) But let's say that I did it right, that my form was right, that I was pulling the right way, all that: Does it make sense that I can do so much weight with that particular exercise as opposed to only doing 45# on squats, 35# on deadlifts...

3 thoughts on your seated rows:

1: Most people are far stronger than they think they are, and it is generally their mind that is the limiting factor. When I was in high school, I set a 40 lbs Deadlift PR by miscounting how much weight was on the bar.

2: Even though it doesn't count as weight, on deadlifts and squats you are moving your entire body from above the knee as well. When you squat 45 lbs you're actually moving considerably more weight than when you're rowing 93.5 (unless you weigh 50 lbs).

3: Not all pulleys are created equal. Depending how how the cable machine is set up (it was on a cable machine, right?) 93.5 lbs on the stack might take considerably less effort to move than 93.5 lbs of barbell.

 

Regardless: you smashed a new personal best! Stay there and continue to improve on it!

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16 hours ago, Alaysia said:

That is an excellent, point, Redstone.

 

You know, I was thinking about this again this morning, gearing up to do some necessary work clothes shopping (and maybe find some jeans finally), and really I think there's something kind of lovely in this idea, in the vein of looking to the future rather than trying to be what we were in the past. (And in my fully formed druidic state I'd go further into just being there in the moment...)

 

*shrugs* feeling poetic about buying black tee shirts today. Must be all that sleep I got :P 

 

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16 hours ago, Alaysia said:
  • I think the water aerobics was a bad move. I barely made my last rep on squats at the same weight and reps I've been at since I started. I was shaking a bit coming up on the last one. I'm hoping it was not allowing a real recovery day that caused that. But then I walked over to where I keep my paper and pencil, wrote my numbers down, then started toward the bench where I do my push-ups when there was this twang in my inner right thigh, just a little posterior of wear a pant seam would run. It was deep, not painful, but I lost control of my leg. Like it wasn't responding to commands. So I waited a moment, took a couple of breaths and it was back online and I was able to walk just fine. Still no pain. About two hours later I started to feel the area where the twang happened. No pain, per se. It was just...very felt. Now, even more hours later, when I squat down to grab something I feel a pull. Please tell me I haven't snapped something inside me that is important!!
  • When I do seated rows, I pulled 93.5# today. It was a mistake because I was totally flustered at the amount of people in the weight area and didn't check before I started. However, once I realized my mistake, I kept doing it for both sets. My brain automatically assumes that I must have screwed up if I didn't fail at such a big jump in weight. (It was hard. I had to pause a couple of times to finish, but I did finish) But let's say that I did it right, that my form was right, that I was pulling the right way, all that: Does it make sense that I can do so much weight with that particular exercise as opposed to only doing 45# on squats, 35# on deadlifts, and 5# on overhead dumbell presses? I do taxes for a living, so it's not like my day job is rolling up fire hoses or something.

1.  That'd scare the hell out of me.  Be very careful.  Especially if it "won't respond" again.  If that happens I'd get to a doctor asap.

2.  You'll always be able to lift more on a machine than in the same exercise done with free weights.  I've never done over 185ish on bent over BB rows but I can do multiple sets at 300 on seated cable rows.  Reason is (on top of what Nate said about pulleys) the machine does some of the work for you by stabilizing the weight. Your body is only responsible for pulling that cable back instead of worrying about balancing the weight/keeping everything even as you come up and go back down/etc.  Hope that makes sense.

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8 hours ago, NatetheStrong said:

3 thoughts on your seated rows:

1: Most people are far stronger than they think they are, and it is generally their mind that is the limiting factor. When I was in high school, I set a 40 lbs Deadlift PR by miscounting how much weight was on the bar.

2: Even though it doesn't count as weight, on deadlifts and squats you are moving your entire body from above the knee as well. When you squat 45 lbs you're actually moving considerably more weight than when you're rowing 93.5 (unless you weigh 50 lbs).

3: Not all pulleys are created equal. Depending how how the cable machine is set up (it was on a cable machine, right?) 93.5 lbs on the stack might take considerably less effort to move than 93.5 lbs of barbell.

 

Regardless: you smashed a new personal best! Stay there and continue to improve on it!

 

This makes a ton of sense. Thank you! Now I can enjoy my victory without feeling wrong about it! Plus, I can tell my mind to shut it and let us see what my body can really do. 

 

 

14 minutes ago, Broba Fett said:

1.  That'd scare the hell out of me.  Be very careful.  Especially if it "won't respond" again.  If that happens I'd get to a doctor asap.

2.  You'll always be able to lift more on a machine than in the same exercise done with free weights.  I've never done over 185ish on bent over BB rows but I can do multiple sets at 300 on seated cable rows.  Reason is (on top of what Nate said about pulleys) the machine does some of the work for you by stabilizing the weight. Your body is only responsible for pulling that cable back instead of worrying about balancing the weight/keeping everything even as you come up and go back down/etc.  Hope that makes sense.

 

1. I was concerned for a moment when I was unsure if I would fall if I tried to take a step, but when there was no pain I moved on since I had all these people in my weight area to worry about (clearly, you can see how sorted my priorities are). I started to get scared when it made its presence known later in the day. Now, this morning, I'm vaguely alarmed. Last night the best I could say it felt like, as I went to sleep, was as if the elastic in my thigh was shot. It still doesn't hurt, but it does feel odd and kind of tight, now. I'm obviously worried about not staying on plan and being taken out of the game this early on.

But I'm wondering if my body gave me a warning shot, not knowing I was done with my squats for the day. I had turned my toes out much more and got a much deeper squat (thank you, @Captain Badass for that inspiration). With that and the aerobics of the night before, the combo may have pissed my body off and it was giving me a chance to avoid catastrophe? (I like to think of my body as a separate entity that I must obey and, occasionally, appease. Between my mind and my body, I have to wonder who I am.) Either way, I'm really and truly resting today. I've even scrapped my plans to prune the roses (which is not a euphemism) and am not doing anything that requires going toward the ground in any way. Hopefully, whatever I've done, will heal and I'll be able to continue. Tomorrow I deadlift, so fingers crossed. 

2. It does make sense. And makes me feel so much better about my numbers on the other exercises, too. It doesn't take away from my win on the machine, but also boosts my confidence in the weights I have going elsewhere. Thank you!

 

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2 hours ago, Alaysia said:

And makes me feel so much better about my numbers on the other exercises, too. It doesn't take away from my win on the machine, but also boosts my confidence in the weights I have going elsewhere. Thank you!

Oh yeah absolutely!  You should feel like a badass.  When I would have a bad day with compound movements at my old gym i'd walk over to the cable machine and just wreck some pulldowns/rows/tri pushdowns/etc to make myself feel better.

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Warrior's Log 1.6

Not a lot to report today.

Fitness: Rest day. And I really rested.

Nutrition: 70g of protein. I had to down a completely superfluous glass of milk to get there, but I did it.

LUML: Started level 2 on Rosetta Stone and did 30 minutes of that. I'm getting better at reading and writing and listening, but bringing the words forth to speak my own sentences on the spot is still tough. I'll get there.

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So deadlifts confuse me. When I first saw them I was all, "So you just pick the bar up, yeah?" Then I started learning more, watched a lot of form videos, and realized that I may not be grasping the intricacies of this movement. You guys gave such great feedback with @~RedStone~, that I'm hoping you can do the same for me. What I understand is that I am to push up with the legs, down through the heels, and then... things get a little fuzzy. Do I pull back my shoulders or not? Do I bend my elbows or keep them loose and straight? Do I come down the right way? How much of my back is involved and when should it be engaged? Thanks for any tips!

 

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Warrior's Log 1.7

 

Fitness: Even though there were a few hiccups, I completed all three workouts this week. Woot!

Nutrition: 106g of protein today. Bam!

LUML: 30 more xp added to the Duolingo coffers.

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15 hours ago, Alaysia said:

So deadlifts confuse me. When I first saw them I was all, "So you just pick the bar up, yeah?" Then I started learning more, watched a lot of form videos, and realized that I may not be grasping the intricacies of this movement. You guys gave such great feedback with @~RedStone~, that I'm hoping you can do the same for me. What I understand is that I am to push up with the legs, down through the heels, and then... things get a little fuzzy. Do I pull back my shoulders or not? Do I bend my elbows or keep them loose and straight? Do I come down the right way? How much of my back is involved and when should it be engaged? Thanks for any tips!

 

 

I'll be curious to see what people say (obvs I'm to new to know.. lol) There's also a form check sub you can post to as well!

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Okay, you're getting set up okay-ish (you have a slight rounding in your lower back when you want more of a neutral curve) but the biggest problem is that your hips are shooting up before you lift the bar from the floor.

 

You want your back to stay at pretty much the same angle until the bar passes your knees. One cue that has really helped me is to stop thinking about lifting the bar: grab onto it, stand up and drag it up your legs as you stand up. It's just meant to come with you.

 

Yes, pretend to squeeze a tennis ball under your armpit to activate your lats but the key thing to remember is that your back basically shouldn't change shape from top to bottom of the lift. Your legs move and the angle changes, but the natural curve of your spine should be the same from bottom to top.

 

Not sure if that helps. Deadlift is the lift that I have the most work to do on teaching!

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It was perfect instruction, @SpecialSundae. Lot of visuals to help me understand. Thank you so very much!

I think what I'm most confused about is does one do most of the lift in the legs or the back. I thought it was the legs, so I was doing everything with the legs, (legs straightening, sending my hips up) and nothing with the back until the bar was at my knees. But I can see that if I'm going to get a natural curve in my back and not round it, that isn't the case. Oh! Wait, is this why the bar is set up on plates in some videos? In order to get that naturalness in the back?

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3 hours ago, Alaysia said:

I think what I'm most confused about is does one do most of the lift in the legs or the back.

 

Here I thought somewhere between the back and the legs was the part of the body that did most of the lift.

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I think that some folks put the bar on plates to get it to the same height that it will be when you get to the 45s.  That height seems to help keep a neutral back.  I get very nervous if I start to feel my low back round during DL.

 

I think that the deadlift is a whole body lift, but the glutes are the A Team.  

 

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My understanding is that a deadlift is a hip hinge. It's a full body movement, but I think just because your glutes and legs are generally much stronger than your back, for example, a lot of the power will have to come from there, otherwise you're limiting what you can lift.

 

This video may be useful, it explains the principles of the set-up, because the way your set up looks may depend on your body shape, but the mechanical principles are the same.

 

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It was perfect instruction, @SpecialSundae. Lot of visuals to help me understand. Thank you so very much!

I think what I'm most confused about is does one do most of the lift in the legs or the back. I thought it was the legs, so I was doing everything with the legs, (legs straightening, sending my hips up) and nothing with the back until the bar was at my knees. But I can see that if I'm going to get a natural curve in my back and not round it, that isn't the case. Oh! Wait, is this why the bar is set up on plates in some videos? In order to get that naturalness in the back?

By standing up and then lifting with the back once the bar passes your knees then you're putting more stress onto your back.

Your shoulders and hips should rise at the same speed rather than hips first then shoulders. When your hips shoot up first before the bar moves, there's no load going through your legs until the bar comes off the floor and then far more going through your back as your legs have pretty much taken themselves to full extension.

If everything moves at once (bar, hips and shoulders at the same speed), you're doing the lift with the big muscles in your glutes and hamstrings and the smaller and weaker muscles in your lower back are relegated to a supporting role. Although sometimes it's better to worry about how to do the lift more than which muscles are working in which ways (at least to begin with).

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9 hours ago, SpecialSundae said:

By standing up and then lifting with the back once the bar passes your knees then you're putting more stress onto your back.

Your shoulders and hips should rise at the same speed rather than hips first then shoulders. When your hips shoot up first before the bar moves, there's no load going through your legs until the bar comes off the floor and then far more going through your back as your legs have pretty much taken themselves to full extension.

If everything moves at once (bar, hips and shoulders at the same speed), you're doing the lift with the big muscles in your glutes and hamstrings and the smaller and weaker muscles in your lower back are relegated to a supporting role. Although sometimes it's better to worry about how to do the lift more than which muscles are working in which ways (at least to begin with).

 

Ah ha! I can totally understand that! Yes, that makes a lot of sense. Knowing which muscles are supposed to be doing what helps me a lot, actually. The write-up in New Rules of Lifting for Women was clear and yet vague on that.
 

Quote

 

     The primary action is called "hip extension" -- straightening your hips when your torso is bent forward. It shares that action with the squat, which means it works many of the same muscles, especially the hamstrings and gluteals. But the muscles of the upper and middle back get more directly involved. The diamond-shaped trapezius-- which runs from the base of your skull, out to your shoulder blades, and down the middle of your back-- is responsible for pulling your shoulder blades together (among other tasks...). With a heavy load in your hands, pulling your arms down and your shoulder blades farther apart, you can see how hard those muscles have to work to pull your shoulders back.

     Naturally everything in the middle of your body that works hard in a squat works at least as hard in a deadlift. You must maintain the natural arch in your lower back, and the heavier the weight you lift off the floor, the harder it is for those muscles to protect your spine. (Remember, "harder" is better when it comes to improving your body in appearance and function.)

 

Again, this section of the book is offered up for discussion purposes.

He explains what's working, but not in what order or hierarchy, and I needed to know that, apparently, for me to understand the movement. I'm looking forward to my next deadlift day to start working on this. Thank you!

9 hours ago, evabo said:

My understanding is that a deadlift is a hip hinge. It's a full body movement, but I think just because your glutes and legs are generally much stronger than your back, for example, a lot of the power will have to come from there, otherwise you're limiting what you can lift.

 

This video may be useful, it explains the principles of the set-up, because the way your set up looks may depend on your body shape, but the mechanical principles are the same.

 

 

That video was excellent! Thank you! I have a short torso, so that makes sense. I'm going to put this into practice, too! I bet you I can actually lift more than I thought I could because I wasn't using those power muscles. I can't wait to see!

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