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Hazard

The Assassins' Den

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8 hours ago, Hazard said:

Now, let's hear your Challenge reports!  How did you do on your goals?  Any woots?  Any struggles?  Any worries going into the next 4WC?  Are there things The Guild can help you with in the next Challenge?

 

I improved my 5k time, even though I thought I had set myself up for failure on that front.

 

I overcame my nerves and submitted my completed novel to four agents, and wrote almost 20k words on my next work-in-progress.

 

And I got stronger and stretched my boundaries on my strength workouts.

 

I'm not gonna lie. This challenge made me a BETTER PERSON.

 

80s excited exciting hell yes the neverending story

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9 hours ago, Hazard said:

 

Now, let's hear your Challenge reports!  How did you do on your goals?  Any woots?  Any struggles?  Any worries going into the next 4WC?  Are there things The Guild can help you with in the next Challenge?

 

This was not a very enthusiastic challenge for me. I set some modest goals, and I did a decent job on them, but it has been kind of meh. I've been putting so much energy into work and renovating the house that I don't have a lot left. But I think a big part of the problem was that I didn't have a really clear plan of action for my exercise goals. For my diet, I wasn't feeling great about it, but I knew exactly what I was supposed to be doing, so I just kept putting one foot in front of the other, and I stayed on track. For exercise, there was a lot of, "Well, yeah, maybe I could do such-and-such.... Eh. Do I have space indoors? Not really.... It is hot and buggy outside... I don't know. Oh, never mind." 

 

So I am going to spend some time during Zero Week making a very clear plan, thinking about all of my various excuses and coming up with something I can do in any of those situations, so I don't get bogged down trying to make decisions.

 

The assassins mini-challenges really help me stick with this though. Even if I am feeling lousy, I MUST log in to Nerd Fitness, because I need to see what is going on with the mini.

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7 hours ago, Darth Yoga said:

The assassins mini-challenges really help me stick with this though. Even if I am feeling lousy, I MUST log in to Nerd Fitness, because I need to see what is going on with the mini.

 

QFT!

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On ‎7‎/‎10‎/‎2016 at 0:36 PM, Hazard said:

Now, let's hear your Challenge reports!  How did you do on your goals?  Any woots?  Any struggles?  Any worries going into the next 4WC?  Are there things The Guild can help you with in the next Challenge?

I did okay with this challenge, was able to upgrade my work out to NFA level 4 body weight, but I'm running into a major issue with my assisted pistol squats of rolling up onto my toes as I squat down.  This may be a result of walking on my toes.  I didn't get my weight down like I wanted but my wife pointed out 10 pounds in a month is extremely unreasonable and unhealthy.  I did windup dropping about 3 pounds, I think next challenge I will add body measurements to the challenge.  Looking forward to next month and continuing the weight loss and body recomposition.

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I nailed one of my goals! Between walking and other exercise, I maintained an average daily step count of over 14,000 steps per day (goal was 13k). I am well on my to earning the $100 prize for the exercise challenge this year. Need to make sure I don't slack off too much on vacation, though. ☺

 

My second goal was pretty much a fail. I lost no fat and no inches. Maybe a very slight redistribution of a few fractions of an inch, but I effectively maintained. I did make some small improvements to my diet, but I still got a ways to go. I think next challenge I'm going to set a goal of not eating purchased meals more than twice a week. I don't know if that'll help with me losing fat, but it should make my wallet get a bit fatter, which will reduce some stress for me, which should help me lose fat!

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19 minutes ago, Elennare said:

I maintained an average daily step count of over 14,000 steps per day

 

Nice!

 

 

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14k + steps?!? That's hella impressive! I think I did alright challenge wise, though getting sick somewhat morphed the goals I had in place to adapt for success instead of seeing it as a failure that I was stuck in bed instead of working out. Otherwise I'd say it was a highly fun challenge and I will probably be doing a "Flash" challenge follow up!

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I did pretty well and I am happy with my results.

 

Spoiler

Sitting pauses – move all day long. Excellent results. I've done a total of 103 sitting pauses! This is the month I have less sat on my whole life. A!

Go out! 18 outside moments. Some were nothing else than sitting to read in the terrace for a while, but others were walks or spending many hours outside. I'll take B- though, because the initial goal was to be out every day, and I've managed to do it a half of the planned days. It is true that in reality I was outside everyday, of course, I don't usually spend a whole day at home without going out, but I wanted it to be me time, social time or exploring time, so errands, groceries shopping and the like don't count.

Have fun! Excellent here too. 18 workouts in 36 days! I had never reached that ratio. A!

Side quest. This is the weakest goal. 15 moments devoted to cleaning and 36 to icelandic, but only 5 to my pedagogical project and 6 to Feldenkrais. C.

 

But, does someone know how I can help my brain with fear to acrobatics? It is really setting back my progress, specially with upside down moves.

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5 hours ago, Elennare said:

I maintained an average daily step count of over 14,000 steps per day (goal was 13k). ...My second goal was pretty much a fail. I lost no fat and no inches. 

 

That is at least five miles. Your fork is clearly a lot faster than Hazard's fork. :D

 

Not eating take-out is a great way to slow that fork down. 

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End of challenge thoughts:

-Handstands are progressing nicely, though I think I can make greater progress (and actually reach my goal in time for Dragoncon) if I move up to training 3x a week.

-Waist measurements are finally moving in the right direction.  Going to have to rethink my diet goals to make sure it stays that way.

 

Goal results:

-I missed a couple workouts because things came up, but my main concern is how many excuses came up when things weren't perfect for my planned workout.  I also don't feel like the sprint days were as much leg work as I'd like (especially since my limiting factor was breathing in the 80-90% humidity).  I'm going to have to rethink my plan and add in some more flexibility moving forward.

-I'm now 0 for 3 on set bedtimes, so it's time to completely rethink this goal.  I'm also feeling more rested lately, so I need to track down the cause and focus on that.

-I didn't cut as much off my waist as when I was calorie tracking and I had close to a week of feeling sick after binging 4th of July weekend.  But I also HATE calorie counting...  I've got some ideas to try next challenge, depending on how that goes I'll develop a longer term plan.

-Projects didn't go particularly well this month.  I made progress, but didn't finish anything.  On the plus side, I'm about to have 7.5 cubic yards of river rock blocking my garage, so the flowerbed will be difficult to ignore. :playful:  I also managed to get my Kid Flash goggles shaped correctly, so they're just waiting on the ears so I can paint everything at the same time.

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On 7/10/2016 at 1:36 PM, Hazard said:

Now, let's hear your Challenge reports!  How did you do on your goals?  Any woots?  Any struggles?  Any worries going into the next 4WC?  Are there things The Guild can help you with in the next Challenge?

 

This challenge felt weird, like I wasn't really pushing myself. Maybe it's because I've moved out of noob gains and it's harder to make progress (or maybe it's because I have crazy expectations for myself).

 

Running - new PR of 14:48 per mile for 2 miles

Pull-ups - moved from 6 to 7 second dead hang

Handstands - improved float time away from wall to 4 seconds

Parkour - established a consistent schedule, improvements on easy vault and tuck jumps

 

Otherwise, though, there was minor improvements with weights, minimal measurement shifts, and no weight change. I did mix some of my exercises up this week, and I think it'll be good going forward, but coming off a shoulder problem and getting sick halfway through made this one kind of meh. Here's to a better next challenge. 

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On 6/21/2016 at 1:44 PM, tourennatrix said:

Hey guys, lookit what just popped up on my phone!

 

 

Nerd Fitness on the Washington Post - so ~fancy~

 

 

On 6/21/2016 at 4:50 PM, Alexandrite said:

GL Starsapart represent!!

 

Sent by my Navi-powered device!

 

On 6/22/2016 at 7:54 AM, Asa Pond said:

Yay! Justice League shout-out!

 

Still love you guys!

 

On 6/22/2016 at 9:58 AM, Trewest said:

Did anyone else find it weird to read Stars' real last name? :P To me she is Starsapart, GL extraordinaire, it was a little jarring to realize she is a mere mortal like the rest of us ;) 

 

On 6/23/2016 at 1:17 PM, karinajean said:

 

um I just recently MET HER and was SUPER NERVOUS because we had a chance to meet a day early and I did NOT look as cute and put together as I had hoped to for our dinner plans!!!

 

I wouldn't say she's a *mere* mortal, but she is actually a human being. (and super sweet and awesome in person.)

 

On 6/24/2016 at 9:48 PM, Darth Yoga said:

 

Starsapart is way easier to pronounce. :D

 

On 6/25/2016 at 4:03 PM, annyshay said:

But don't all heroes have alter egos?

 

 

WAY LATE TO THIS PARTY but you guys just gave me the warm fuzzies. :love_heart:

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On ‎7‎/‎12‎/‎2016 at 3:39 AM, zenLara said:

I did pretty well and I am happy with my results.

 

  Hide contents

Sitting pauses – move all day long. Excellent results. I've done a total of 103 sitting pauses! This is the month I have less sat on my whole life. A!

Go out! 18 outside moments. Some were nothing else than sitting to read in the terrace for a while, but others were walks or spending many hours outside. I'll take B- though, because the initial goal was to be out every day, and I've managed to do it a half of the planned days. It is true that in reality I was outside everyday, of course, I don't usually spend a whole day at home without going out, but I wanted it to be me time, social time or exploring time, so errands, groceries shopping and the like don't count.

Have fun! Excellent here too. 18 workouts in 36 days! I had never reached that ratio. A!

Side quest. This is the weakest goal. 15 moments devoted to cleaning and 36 to icelandic, but only 5 to my pedagogical project and 6 to Feldenkrais. C.

 

But, does someone know how I can help my brain with fear to acrobatics? It is really setting back my progress, specially with upside down moves.

 

Actually yeah, one of the things I learned in psychology for people with irregular fears and phobias.

One trick is to start by literally sitting reverse on a couch. Sit with your head hanging upside down off the end/side and your feet up in the air. You can also start even smaller by just laying on the floor on your back with your feet up the wall, but I think you're probably a little past that part :P 

Basically the more little upside down time you do, the more you reinforce in your brain that it's not going to hurt you. That way you can build up to doing handstands or aerial hangs.

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43 minutes ago, Trewest said:

 

Actually yeah, one of the things I learned in psychology for people with irregular fears and phobias.

One trick is to start by literally sitting reverse on a couch. Sit with your head hanging upside down off the end/side and your feet up in the air. You can also start even smaller by just laying on the floor on your back with your feet up the wall, but I think you're probably a little past that part :P 

Basically the more little upside down time you do, the more you reinforce in your brain that it's not going to hurt you. That way you can build up to doing handstands or aerial hangs.

 

Hi Trewest, thank you very much for your advice. I will try to work that way. You're right that the more I get used to be upside down, the easier will get to think clearly (which I just can't do right now).

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On 7/12/2016 at 3:39 AM, zenLara said:

But, does someone know how I can help my brain with fear to acrobatics? It is really setting back my progress, specially with upside down moves.

 

In my yoga program, the two primary poses we tend to suggest for people reluctant to try full inversion are these ones:


320x240xl-shape-handstand-shoulder-stret    ardhasirsasan+for+blog.jpg 

Apparently the first one is way less scary when we call it "Down dog against the wall" instead of "half handstand". That name also means students know they ought to have a solid down dog first - they need to have sufficient shoulder mobility to get the arms in line with the torso. And it helps convince them that they should master holding this pose with a clean 90-degree angle at the waist and straight line between arms and torso, for 10 breaths (about a minute), without them trying to kick into a full handstand, because we aren't practicing handstand, we're practicing down dog. :D

 

The half-headstand progresses by walking the feet every so slightly closer and closer to the head, pressing the arms strongly into the floor and engaging the core, with NO JUMPING OR KICKING UP. (Apparently my teacher's teacher, in India, would hit people with his cane for kicking up... :D "no kicking" doesn't mean "just a little kicking" either. It means lifting with zero momentum. This video shows it done perfectly.) As your center of mass moves over your base of support, your weight naturally comes off the feet and you can just hang out there in that half-pike position with the toes hovering. When that is ROCK SOLID, pick the feet up into a tucked headstand, and again, stay with that until rock solid. 

 

4c99d95334ce07d0b65abb406f7b2baa.jpg

 

The piked headstand gives people loads of time to develop the shoulder and core stability to support the pose, and get accustomed to being upside down in a supported position, before they are in any danger of falling. (Dolphin pushups are by far my favorite way of building core and shoulder stability for headstand.)

 

The tripod handstand, starting from an inverted crow/crane pose, is substantially easier to do than the forearm headstand, but in yoga it is generally considered a more advanced posture because it puts a lot more pressure on the neck. (The yoga headstand progressions are generally a process of putting more and more of the weight on your head, moving your arms further away/etc.)

 

headstand3-kristin-tripod.jpg

We also have this weird little "inversion chair" which I'll encourage folks to try if - with a spotter - if they want to experience a full inversion but either have trouble with their neck or lack the shoulder strength to support a headstand. Because you can push and pull against the stool with your arms, you have very good control over tipping backwards. But since it isn't something folks are going to have at home, it is just a "try it to see what it feels like" thing.

feet-up-kopfstand-hocker-2.jpg   


 

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1 hour ago, Darth Yoga said:

 

In my yoga program, the two primary poses we tend to suggest for people reluctant to try full inversion are these ones:


320x240xl-shape-handstand-shoulder-stret    ardhasirsasan+for+blog.jpg 

Apparently the first one is way less scary when we call it "Down dog against the wall" instead of "half handstand". That name also means students know they ought to have a solid down dog first - they need to have sufficient shoulder mobility to get the arms in line with the torso. And it helps convince them that they should master holding this pose with a clean 90-degree angle at the waist and straight line between arms and torso, for 10 breaths (about a minute), without them trying to kick into a full handstand, because we aren't practicing handstand, we're practicing down dog. :D

 

The half-headstand progresses by walking the feet every so slightly closer and closer to the head, pressing the arms strongly into the floor and engaging the core, with NO JUMPING OR KICKING UP. (Apparently my teacher's teacher, in India, would hit people with his cane for kicking up... :D "no kicking" doesn't mean "just a little kicking" either. It means lifting with zero momentum. This video shows it done perfectly.) As your center of mass moves over your base of support, your weight naturally comes off the feet and you can just hang out there in that half-pike position with the toes hovering. When that is ROCK SOLID, pick the feet up into a tucked headstand, and again, stay with that until rock solid. 

 

4c99d95334ce07d0b65abb406f7b2baa.jpg

 

The piked headstand gives people loads of time to develop the shoulder and core stability to support the pose, and get accustomed to being upside down in a supported position, before they are in any danger of falling. (Dolphin pushups are by far my favorite way of building core and shoulder stability for headstand.)

 

The tripod handstand, starting from an inverted crow/crane pose, is substantially easier to do than the forearm headstand, but in yoga it is generally considered a more advanced posture because it puts a lot more pressure on the neck. (The yoga headstand progressions are generally a process of putting more and more of the weight on your head, moving your arms further away/etc.)

 

headstand3-kristin-tripod.jpg

We also have this weird little "inversion chair" which I'll encourage folks to try if - with a spotter - if they want to experience a full inversion but either have trouble with their neck or lack the shoulder strength to support a headstand. Because you can push and pull against the stool with your arms, you have very good control over tipping backwards. But since it isn't something folks are going to have at home, it is just a "try it to see what it feels like" thing.

feet-up-kopfstand-hocker-2.jpg   


 

 

Hi Darth Yoga,

 

this is very good information, thank you. I've tried declined planks many times, but always forming a diagonal with the wall, so it never feels like I am really upside down. I'll try this right angle, though it looks pretty difficult.

I am not so confident to try the other positions, because, doesn't it hurt to hold your whole body on your head? Anyway I find very interesting the "not kicking up or jumping up", because I guess that's how you slowly build strength and flexibility enough to hold a nice position.

And great videos! Thank you very much. I'll take a closer look to those dolphin push-ups.

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51 minutes ago, zenLara said:

this is very good information, thank you. I've tried declined planks many times, but always forming a diagonal with the wall, so it never feels like I am really upside down. I'll try this right angle, though it looks pretty difficult.

I am not so confident to try the other positions, because, doesn't it hurt to hold your whole body on your head? Anyway I find very interesting the "not kicking up or jumping up", because I guess that's how you slowly build strength and flexibility enough to hold a nice position.

And great videos! Thank you very much. I'll take a closer look to those dolphin push-ups.

 

The down dog is an easy one to do a progression on - like with plank, just start with feet slightly elevated, and work on getting them higher. It is hard to get a grip on the wall at that angle though, so you can put a sturdy chair against the wall and stand on the seat of the chair. A windowsill can also work. Or just do declined planks however you do them, but lift your hips and walk your hands in closer. 

 

Putting weight on the head is a tricky thing. A lot of people have neck troubles that make it a bad idea. You can do headstand with the shoulders supported by blocks or chairs but that can be awkward to get into at first. With the traditional yoga headstand 90% of your weight is supposed to be supported by the forearms, but a lot of folks don't have the upper body strength to do that initially. The dolphin pushup is a fairly safe way to build the shoulder strength for that.

 

For a more direct route, you might try hanging upside down by your knees from a bar, with the help of a spotter or two. But that isn't my specialty - ask our fearless leader @starsapart for suggestions of safe ways for a beginner to hang upside down.

 

Also, just as a general caution, inversions are often problematic for folks with high blood pressure - once they get upside down, the blood pressure in the head gets high enough that it is really uncomfortable. But if that is the case, you'll notice. There are some risks with other heart conditions as well.

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21 minutes ago, Darth Yoga said:

For a more direct route, you might try hanging upside down by your knees from a bar, with the help of a spotter or two. But that isn't my specialty - ask our fearless leader @starsapart for suggestions of safe ways for a beginner to hang upside down.

 

Did someone call my name~?

 

So this is a very basic knee hang done by a beginner:

P1000015.jpg

 

Your spotter should hold you at the ankles and press gently down.  If you do not bend your knees enough, you will slip off the bar.  With a spotter you can ensure this doesn't happen and safely hang upside down (not for too long to start, mind).

 

The biggest trouble is GETTING into this position on a pull-up bar.  I do not recommend doing this on something mounted in a doorway.  If you have a bar attached to a squat rack or something similarly sturdy, you'll do better.  Now the traditional way up that I've always used is a pike mount, where you pull yourself through to this position:

kameron-on-trapeze-perfect-pike-form-10_

 

And then hook your knees.  The problem is that getting to that pike involves a lot of core strength which you may not have.  I'm not sure of your current level!  If this is tough but your bar is low enough, you can grab your bar firmly, lean back, and then put one foot on the bar, then the other to scramble up into the hanging position that way.  A little less graceful but it works!  There's a variant shown at ~1:46 here:

 

Now that said, never ever ever try aerial inversion without 1) a spotter and 2) a crash mat.  If you are lacking either of these things and you've never done these before, I would recommend not doing them!!!

 

I really like hammock/sling or aerial silks with a knot for gentle beginner inversion because you can just tip back:

 

 

But of course, this takes specialized equipment..................

 

By the way, seconding the "most of the weight is in your arms" for tripod OR yoga headstands!  Unless you're doing one of the crazy no-arms variants.

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54 minutes ago, starsapart said:

I really like hammock/sling or aerial silks with a knot for gentle beginner inversion because you can just tip back:

 

I was thinking of the "tipping back on a swing" thing, but playground swingsets aren't sized for adults, and when I was contemplating how to describe rigging up something for that, I remembered we had a local expert.

 

I've made a couple hammocks for camping and sleeping, and I am now seriously tempted to rig up something for suspension/acrobatic type stuff. In fact, I just wasted an hour looking up aerial silk / hammock rigging. :) My ceilings are super low though.

 

 

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On 7/11/2016 at 1:36 AM, Hazard said:

Now, let's hear your Challenge reports!  How did you do on your goals?  Any woots?  Any struggles?  Any worries going into the next 4WC?  Are there things The Guild can help you with in the next Challenge?

 

hello everybody!!! 

 

I feel so MIA the past days because I simply can't keep up with everything happening here. When I joined NF, life was pretty boring for me and I was really looking for a way to motivate myself to be more physically outgoing (cue: exercise) rather than spend all my free time binge-ing on tv series and stuff. 

 

Fast forward 2 months and life has filled itself up for me. I'm juggling physical activities (workouts anyone?) and social life (love life, career life) and simply must prioritize between these and all those other stuff. But I haven't forgotten you my NF friends :) and will do as much reading as I can.. or at least comment on the last bits. 

 

I hope you all had a great 4WC. My biggest win is the evident - very evident - change in my overall body. People really can't help but complement that I've gotten thinner and leaner. I posted a photo of mine in my challenge thread which is here:

 

Spoiler

 

 

This week, I noticed I can do 10 complete and correct form push ups! Yey! Which was really more than I can do before. From this, my next 4WC was inspired. :) So I am thrilled to write it down. 

 

Last month, I also got the nerve to go see a doctor and get my health checked and well, I still have some pounds to shed -- 22 lbs to be exact! So next 4WC will mostly center on that. NF (namely Noel) has been very helpful in teaching me how to do calorie counting and though still very challenging, I am doing my best (thanks to those who suggested My Fitness Pal). 

 

I'm sad not to have participated as much in the minis though but hopefully, I can still participate in the next one? :)

 

See you all in the next round!

 

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10 hours ago, Darth Yoga said:

Putting weight on the head is a tricky thing. A lot of people have neck troubles that make it a bad idea. The dolphin pushup is a fairly safe way to build the shoulder strength for that.

I think I'll stick to down dog and dolphin push-ups by now. I have a weak neck, and although I am working on it, I need more time for that.

 

10 hours ago, starsapart said:

Did someone call my name~?

Hi, starspart, thank you for coming and giving advice. It is a pitty that my gym doesn't have hanging bars, it seems like a nice way to work on upside down poses. They have silks but they are put away while we work for security (I go to floor lessons in fact).

-----

Anyway, I'll put in practice the advice received and start working on spending more time upside down, even if not the exact moves I'll have to do in my lessons. I guess I was too focused on practicing what was being done in the class, and now that I've read you I see there are many things I can do to improve what then happens in the class. Thank you very much!

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16 hours ago, Darth Yoga said:

 

I was thinking of the "tipping back on a swing" thing, but playground swingsets aren't sized for adults, and when I was contemplating how to describe rigging up something for that, I remembered we had a local expert.

 

I've made a couple hammocks for camping and sleeping, and I am now seriously tempted to rig up something for suspension/acrobatic type stuff. In fact, I just wasted an hour looking up aerial silk / hammock rigging. :) My ceilings are super low though.

 

 

 

I would not recommend rigging at home.  At least, not wiothout a few caveats:

  1. Make sure you get a professional rigger to do it.  You could seriously damage the structure of your house not to mention yourself.  There are things people literally go to school for to ensure this doesn't happen...
  2. Check with your homeowners' insurance.  Some insurance companies will cease covering you AT ALL if you have circus equipment rigged in your house (which could lead to foreclosure!!!!) and some just throw your policy cost up by a massive amount.

Basically, I wanted a home rig, did the research, and went, "nahhhhhhhhhh I'm good."

 

6 hours ago, zenLara said:

Hi, starspart, thank you for coming and giving advice. It is a pitty that my gym doesn't have hanging bars, it seems like a nice way to work on upside down poses. They have silks but they are put away while we work for security (I go to floor lessons in fact).

-----

Anyway, I'll put in practice the advice received and start working on spending more time upside down, even if not the exact moves I'll have to do in my lessons. I guess I was too focused on practicing what was being done in the class, and now that I've read you I see there are many things I can do to improve what then happens in the class. Thank you very much!

 

You're so welcome!  Getting comfortable inverting is a process for a lot of people. :)

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7 hours ago, starsapart said:

Getting comfortable inverting is a process for a lot of people.

If it is a process, then I guess I'm not a lost cause... Thanks for pointing it out.

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10 hours ago, starsapart said:

I would not recommend rigging at home.  At least, not wiothout a few caveats:

  1. Make sure you get a professional rigger to do it.  You could seriously damage the structure of your house not to mention yourself.  There are things people literally go to school for to ensure this doesn't happen...
  2. Check with your homeowners' insurance.  Some insurance companies will cease covering you AT ALL if you have circus equipment rigged in your house (which could lead to foreclosure!!!!) and some just throw your policy cost up by a massive amount.

Basically, I wanted a home rig, did the research, and went, "nahhhhhhhhhh I'm good."

 

Oh, I wouldn't really be doing anything actually acrobatic - just chilling out upside down, like from a swingset. More "hammock chair" than "circus rigging". But good advice in general, thank you. :) I am not always as safety-conscious as I could be! (This is why my partner gets to veto all my crazy plans.)

 

The cathedral ceilings in our dining room are super tempting, but no way would anyone else in the house be down with that. If left unsupervised I swear I'd have rock climbing grips and rigging and all manner of nonsense in there. But no, they want a dining room table, and cabinets for the fancy dishes, etc. etc. *sigh* No fun at all.

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On 7/12/2016 at 1:27 AM, Darth Yoga said:

 

That is at least five miles. Your fork is clearly a lot faster than Hazard's fork. :D

 

Not eating take-out is a great way to slow that fork down. 

It's not all walking. I get to convert any exercise I do into steps, too.  But yes, clearly my fork is too fast. :D  Slowing it down has been a challenge for me for quite a while.

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