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I have a question for y'all.

Currently, my body type is fat and muscle (37% fat, unfortunately).

Based on my father, it's possible for me to get slim, but strength training feels more natural for me. I love it, but I can't stand cardio. I simply can't keep my heart rate high for long without feeling like I'm going to die (i.e. I'm out of shape).

Is it possible to lose weight with the objective of being both strong and lean? Are those honestly contradictory things, because everyone seems to describe it as if it were so?

"You need to eat more to gain muscles." "You need to eat less to lose fat."

"You need to slow, low reps and high weight." "You need quick, high reps with low weight."

https://www.nerdfitness.com/character/89458

IF YOU CAN HELP ME WITH ANY OF MY GOALS, PLEASE CONTACT ME! Even if it's just "here's a link to workouts".

I like doing martial arts (including swords), coding (Java and basic HTML webpages), and small-scale bit art (thus the avatar). I like dancing too, but the fancy kind. Except Latin. I suck at Latin. I need a Latin teacher.

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3 hours ago, neomattlac said:

I have a question for y'all.

Currently, my body type is fat and muscle (37% fat, unfortunately).

Based on my father, it's possible for me to get slim, but strength training feels more natural for me. I love it, but I can't stand cardio. I simply can't keep my heart rate high for long without feeling like I'm going to die (i.e. I'm out of shape).

Is it possible to lose weight with the objective of being both strong and lean? Are those honestly contradictory things, because everyone seems to describe it as if it were so?

"You need to eat more to gain muscles." "You need to eat less to lose fat."

"You need to slow, low reps and high weight." "You need quick, high reps with low weight."

 

Yes, there's a big neurological component to maximal strength. You could think of strength training as software upgrades, and hypertrophy as hardware upgrades--sure, you have a lot more potential to get stronger if you're huge, but that doesn't mean you can't be relatively strong with the hardware you're currently working with. That's why there's weight classes in Powerlifting.

 

Use strength training to get stronger and your nutrition to get leaner. See what happens. (Probably don't overdo either.) Strong and lean.

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Look at any athlete in any sport that combines strength and endurance (e.g. rowers or girevik), and they are strong and (relatively) lean. Or look at any sport that favours strength and has weight classes (oviously, weightlifting, powerlifting and martial arts). Strong and lean athletes (in any weight class below "open", obviously). So it is totally possible to be both strong an lean at the same time. And no, rowers don't do extreme "bulk and cut" cycles like bodybuilders.  :beaten:

If you have a relatively high body fat percentage, it is possible to maintain muscle while in a calorie deficit, or to actually gain muscle while on maintenance calories. Of course, one day the day will come when you have to decide where to set your priorities, but that is not now. Not yet.
Also, on an intermediate level, you can do both - endurance training an strength training. They actually help each other. Of course, one day the day will come when you'll have to decide where to set your priorities (you only can work out so much and eventually recovery time will become the limiting factor), but again, that day is not now.  
And if you like strength training more than cardio, there is nothing wrong with focusing on that, too. (Note that every athelete  can benefit from a bit of cardio, so do not totally dismiss that.)

I'll absolutely second @Machete: eat a clean diet and do strength training. If you feel like you need to improve your cardiovacular fitness, do some cardio, too. Stop worrying, everything will be ok. It won't happen overnight, but I'd be damned if you won't see serious improvements over the next year.

Rowing, rucking, running, lifting heavy stuff. Why not do it all?

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Honestly, this is why Obstacle Course Racing appeals to me. You need both. Everyone who races these competitively are LEAN. But they're strong. They can do rigs and support their entire bodies with their arms, they can carry a 50 lb wreck back and run it for a mile, they can pull 150lb weighted bag and slowly lower it down- and on top of that do this in between running 6 minute miles. You can have agility, speed and strength- however it's difficult to train for all 3 once you reach a certain point and you won't excel in any one over someone who is just concentrating on that one area (endurance/speed runners at your same level will be faster, lifters at your same level will lift more, however when you use all 3 in conjunction you'll come out ahead)

 

You can have both strength and leanness. (Some of the consistent top competitors for visualization on what lean strength looks like) These guys won't be able to deadlift 600 lbs, but they're still insanely strong. It just depends what kind of strength you're looking for. 

 

Image result for Hobie call, Ryan atkins

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1 hour ago, Slates said:

pull 150lb weighted bag and slowly lower it down

 

Is this Spartan Race? My cousin was so mad about this one--it was the only obstacle he had to do burpees for. I had to anchor my 135-pound body under the fence in order for it to not turn into a rope climb. That makes sense now.

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On 10/10/2016 at 0:13 PM, Machete said:

 

Is this Spartan Race? My cousin was so mad about this one--it was the only obstacle he had to do burpees for. I had to anchor my 135-pound body under the fence in order for it to not turn into a rope climb. That makes sense now.

Yep. The bags for females are usually 75-110 lbs and for men it's 120-150. If it's raining even more since they hold water, it's a huge pain!

Spaz Ranger

BATTLE LOG

You can have results or excuses. Not both

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On 10/7/2016 at 0:06 PM, neomattlac said:

Is it possible to lose weight with the objective of being both strong and lean? Are those honestly contradictory things, because everyone seems to describe it as if it were so?

"You need to eat more to gain muscles." "You need to eat less to lose fat."

Like everyone's said, you can be strong and lean.

 

But it is also true that you need to eat more to gain muscle, and eat less to lose fat. That just means that for the majority of people, it's easier to pick one or the other to focus on initially. (This is where the bulk/cut cycle can come into play.) Some people can build muscle while losing fat (it's a slow and gradual process), by eating close to maintenance levels, with adequate protein, and a good strength training program. 

 

Just starting out, it's possible/easier to lose fat (by eating less) while gaining strength (by training). I would just work on getting eating habits under control, and moving towards a cleaner (less processed food) diet, while keeping up the strength training. If the bf% isn't going down as fast as you'd like, trying eating a little less (but don't rush things). If your gains aren't as impressive as you'd like, try eating a little more (and make sure you have a solid program).

Current Challenge: Zeroh, stick to the routine!

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Concerning the "strong and lean" thing: the others said basically everything. Especially @zeroh13's point is very important. Both is possible in the long run, but in the beginning it's much easier to focus on one thing. And cleaning up your diet is something you have to do anyway.

 

That you "can't stand cardio" is a problem in some way. You have to realise, though, that trampling on a treadmill for an hour is not cardio. Walking everyday for 30 minutes is cardio. Playing Ultimate Frisbee three times a week is cardio. Chasing your dog around the park every morning is cardio.

So, it's totally okay if you can't stand traditional cardio. BUT! it is vital that you find a low-intensity movement you can do as often as possible and that you enjoy.

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The impediment to action advances action. What stands in the way becomes the way.

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To be clear, I am reading all the posts in the thread. I didn't just jump ship.

Currently, I see three issues:

A. I perform my workout at high weight, slow reps. Which essentially turns, what my trainer wanted to be endurance training, into strength training.

B. I keep skipping cardio, screwing me up.

C. I'm not sticking to the food plan well, which I believe is screwing up my metabolism.

https://www.nerdfitness.com/character/89458

IF YOU CAN HELP ME WITH ANY OF MY GOALS, PLEASE CONTACT ME! Even if it's just "here's a link to workouts".

I like doing martial arts (including swords), coding (Java and basic HTML webpages), and small-scale bit art (thus the avatar). I like dancing too, but the fancy kind. Except Latin. I suck at Latin. I need a Latin teacher.

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A: would not worry. Strength training is always a good idea. Whether the focus is on strength, hypertrophy, or strength endurance...doesn't really matter at this point. (Of course it makes a difference - but at your current level, it i smuch more important that you DO strength training than where in strength training your focus is.)
B: rereading your initial post, I get the impression that you might just be overdoing it - you go way too fast, then you can't keep the high pace, feel bad und screw up. Solution: Go slower! Cardio does not necessarily mean you have to run on a threadmill or sit on a spinning bike until you puke. You can always go outdoors, too... If you find you can't run long enough distances yet, even walking is cardio. (Most people do their steady-state cardio way too fast, by the way, and would profit more from a brisk walk than from running their lungs out...) 
Your destination is just 2km away? Why wait for the bus (or worse, torture your car's engine with cold starts) - just walk there. Don't just amble or linger... walk! A brisk walk can get your heart rate elevated, too... Your destination is more than 3km away? Fine, it just takes longer. Even better for your heart. Or just take the bike. Walking or cycling >1h a day every day with a slightly elevated heart rate is way better then getting on the threadmill with a heart rate of 150 every two weeks and skipping the workout after 15minutes... 
C: That is probably the most important issue. 
 

Focus on your diet. Diet is 80%... you've heard it often enough. Continue strength training and don't worry too much. Try to integrate more activity in your daily life - that will burn calories and build a foundation for cardiovascular fitness - and you won't even notice you're doing cardio.:-)

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Rowing, rucking, running, lifting heavy stuff. Why not do it all?

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