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Some advice needed!

I injured my knee years ago, had surgery to fix it, but as a result have rather weak legs (particularly the injured knee leg). To be specific- I have a hole in the cartilage of my patella (knee cap), and it gets irritated if I go up a lot of stairs/do anything like a squat.

I was advised by my Physio and Surgeon that if I did anything like squats, lunges, leg presses, weight bearing excercise where my knee flexes to 90 degrees or more- would be very bad. Or impact exercise (running, skipping, etc) as that would just irritate it too. I "might cause further injury". Well, I'm sick of not being able to work my legs out. It sucks. I don't like being weak and I want to get stronger.

I'd like some advice from anyone that's had a knee injury and been able to over-come it. Or if anyone can offer some advice in general as to how I can gradually make myself strong enough to do these kinds of exercises. Because I think wrapping my body in cotton-wool isn't going to help me when I get older.

Any help would be appreciated. ANY!

Raider

xo

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So I have a question specific to squatting. I've read that, especially once you're squatting heavier weights, the best place to position your hands on the bar is close to your shoulders. I think I read somewhere on these boards that 2" from each shoulder is a good distance.

I'm finding that I can't get my grip anywhere near that close to my shoulders. My hands seem to grip the bar about 8-10 inches from my shoulders (and if the squat rack wasn't in the way, I'd probably position even wider). Any closer, and my wrists contort in all sorts of uncomfortable/unsafe ways. Is this just a flexibility issue? What's the main benefit to a closer grip? And if it's a flexibility issue, anyone have a suggested way to stretch that'd help?

Thanks for any help or insights,

Jeff

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I was advised by my Physio and Surgeon that if I did anything like squats, lunges, leg presses, weight bearing excercise where my knee flexes to 90 degrees or more- would be very bad.

Looks like someone needs to find another professional, who has experience with athlete rehab.

Or even just resisted cycling. It's better than nothing.

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Some advice needed!

I injured my knee years ago, had surgery to fix it, but as a result have rather weak legs (particularly the injured knee leg). To be specific- I have a hole in the cartilage of my patella (knee cap), and it gets irritated if I go up a lot of stairs/do anything like a squat.

I was advised by my Physio and Surgeon that if I did anything like squats, lunges, leg presses, weight bearing excercise where my knee flexes to 90 degrees or more- would be very bad. Or impact exercise (running, skipping, etc) as that would just irritate it too. I "might cause further injury". Well, I'm sick of not being able to work my legs out. It sucks. I don't like being weak and I want to get stronger.

I would honestly bring this question to someone who knows your body very well, like a doctor or physical therapist. Not comfortable giving any sort of advice :)

So I have a question specific to squatting. I've read that, especially once you're squatting heavier weights, the best place to position your hands on the bar is close to your shoulders. I think I read somewhere on these boards that 2" from each shoulder is a good distance.

I'm finding that I can't get my grip anywhere near that close to my shoulders. My hands seem to grip the bar about 8-10 inches from my shoulders (and if the squat rack wasn't in the way, I'd probably position even wider). Any closer, and my wrists contort in all sorts of uncomfortable/unsafe ways. Is this just a flexibility issue? What's the main benefit to a closer grip? And if it's a flexibility issue, anyone have a suggested way to stretch that'd help?

Thanks for any help or insights,

Jeff

work on your flexibility. i'd practice with a pvc pipe.

also, www.mobilitywod.com = do those.

closer the grip - the better the shelf your back will form.

A question about lunges, is one rep after you've gone down with both legs, or is it after one leg?

both legs = 1 rep. some places list it as "5 reps per leg".

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So, I have two questions, one about me the other about a technique I saw at the gym last night.

This dude was going beast mode on the flat bench doing barbell presses with his hand turned in. Like, imagine you lay down to do your regular bench press, but setup your hands like you were going to curl. He was a pretty solid looking dude, doing more weight than I can with my regular bench. I asked him about it and he said that it's a total tricep work out instead of chest/tris like regular bench is. Has anyone heard of this/tried it? Because it looked scary as hell, I doubt I could hold the weight like that.

As for me, my wrist is still killing me. It usually only hurts when I'm doing preacher curls, as I'm bending my wrist a lot at the top and bottom of the curl. But last night it hurt and was getting stiff about halfway through my squats. I understand that the wrist is bent and supporting the weight from rolling off my shoulders(low bar squat), but I'd hate to think that my squats are going to suffer because of my wrist. I guess the question really is, is there some form of support brace that I can use for my wrist or exercises I can do to fight the obvious carpal tunnel that I have going on?

Thanks.

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So, I have two questions, one about me the other about a technique I saw at the gym last night.

This dude was going beast mode on the flat bench doing barbell presses with his hand turned in. Like, imagine you lay down to do your regular bench press, but setup your hands like you were going to curl. He was a pretty solid looking dude, doing more weight than I can with my regular bench. I asked him about it and he said that it's a total tricep work out instead of chest/tris like regular bench is. Has anyone heard of this/tried it? Because it looked scary as hell, I doubt I could hold the weight like that.

Thanks.

Sounds weird. So just like a regular bench press but with the hands inverted? The only exercise that I have heard that is really good for triceps is shown in the following video:

http-~~-//vimeo.com/25983467

As for your wrists, in squats your wrists should not be bent. They should be straight with your forearms. And yes they will suffer from bad wrists because you are not allowing the weight to be fully carried by the back. As for your curls, keep the wrist straight as well.

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Hey guys, I figured this was the best place to pose my question. I've been having some hamstring pain in my left leg recently, and I suspect it's due to my quads being a lot stronger than my hams. I did some research on exercises that work the hamstrings, but most of them seem to require machines and weights, none of which I have access to. I did find the glute ham raise, though, which seems doable as long as you can anchor your feet under something. I'm just wondering if anyone has experience with this exercise and could offer advice, or if you can think of a better or additional way for me to strengthen my hamstrings. Thanks! :)

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Squats! Seriously very good hammy exercise when done properly. Hitting parallel between your knees and hips starts activates the hammies. Going below parallel strengthens them even more.

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The one legged squats are especially brutal. I use the bench so I don't fall over if I don't make it, but you could easily use just a chair as long as it's one that won't slide (or wheel) around on you.

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Hey guys, I figured this was the best place to pose my question. I've been having some hamstring pain in my left leg recently, and I suspect it's due to my quads being a lot stronger than my hams. I did some research on exercises that work the hamstrings, but most of them seem to require machines and weights, none of which I have access to. I did find the glute ham raise, though, which seems doable as long as you can anchor your feet under something. I'm just wondering if anyone has experience with this exercise and could offer advice, or if you can think of a better or additional way for me to strengthen my hamstrings. Thanks! :)

Glute/ham raises are hard so have a buddy or a broom stick or something to assist you lest you face plant. Not many people people can actually do an unassisted raise right off the bat so consider starting with negatives. That is, start at the top and lower yourself under control. Again, have a helper or assistance because the risk of losing control and face planting is pretty high here.

Other great glute/ham exercises are lunges, glute bridges, hip thrusts, split squats and regular parallel or better squats. Split squats, lunges and single leg bridges are good if you think one side is stronger than the other but pain on one side doesn't necessarily mean this is the case.

What sort of pain are you having? And where exactly is it? Back, inside, outside? Closer to your butt or knee? During exercise, after or all the time? What's your hammy flexibility like?

People probably love me, ask a question get 30 in return!

Edit: Just watched the video. That's a valid way to do them too if you've got strong knee push ups and can safely catch your own weight.

Edited by jdanger

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This dude was going beast mode on the flat bench doing barbell presses with his hand turned in. Like, imagine you lay down to do your regular bench press, but setup your hands like you were going to curl. He was a pretty solid looking dude, doing more weight than I can with my regular bench. I asked him about it and he said that it's a total tricep work out instead of chest/tris like regular bench is. Has anyone heard of this/tried it? Because it looked scary as hell, I doubt I could hold the weight like that.

Reverse grip bench press. There's a chaosandpain article on it somewhere.

Move a bench into the power cage and do it off the pins so you don't drop the bar on yourself.

I did find the glute ham raise, though, which seems doable as long as you can anchor your feet under something. I'm just wondering if anyone has experience with this exercise and could offer advice, or if you can think of a better or additional way for me to strengthen my hamstrings. Thanks! :)

I've tried it with my ankles in the seat of the lat pulldown machine. I'd push off the ground a tiny bit with my hands at the bottom and go fully erect.

Don't start with a lot of reps and sets like I did at first, unless you want to take a week off to deal with your sore, stiff legs that can't stretch past the sitting position. Start with one easy set and work your way up.

Technically, without the range of motion to do an upper body extension while bent over, it's a hamstring raise.

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BAMF and bigm - I do a lot of bodyweight squats, but I don't usually got much past parallel for fear of knee strain. I can definitely feel my hamstrings working, but nowhere near as much as my quads and glutes. I guess maybe I should work on getting deeper in the squats?

What sort of pain are you having? And where exactly is it? Back, inside, outside? Closer to your butt or knee? During exercise, after or all the time? What's your hammy flexibility like?

Thanks so much for he advice! I'll look up info about those exercises. :)

It's not severe pain, but when I stretch or walk up stairs I can feel soreness in what I think is the Biceps femoris - just above the mid point of my thigh, and also some up where the muscles anchor into the ischium. I've noticed that my flexibility on that side has decreased a lot because of the soreness. I used to have no problem reaching way past my feet in a seated forward fold, but lately it's been tough to get that leg down straight and stretch out. As for when it hurts, not so much during exercise, but after the muscles cool down and stiffen up it hurts more. And in some yoga poses that require deep stretches or lunges I've had to be careful with it.

Carjack - Cool, thanks! I'll try just a few at first.

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I've got a question about the RSG. I bought it the other week, and I'm planning on using it for the upcoming challenge! I'm not completely new to working out, but I've only done bodyweight exercises before, along with running.

The question is: would you suggest I use the Basic Training program or skip it and go straight to the Barbell Battalion? I would really like to take advantage of my noob gains with lifting and build some serious muscle, but I don't know if it's suggested that I stick with Basic Training for the first go 'round. What do you guys think? Getting to a jump, wouldn't really be an issue in either case.

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Were it me, I'd do the Basic Training first. If you are a noob, you WILL see gains, within weeks. And you will get into the habit and get the practice. I bought the Fitness and Strength programs, finished the Rookie Fitness Program, and am now mixing and matching from Convict Conditioning, Starting Strength, RFG, RSG, and New Rules of Lifting. Plus I started tai chi two days a week. I work out at the Y, in my basement, and at my kids' karate studio on their machines. I'm never guaranteed ahead of time when equipment will be available, how much time I'll have, or what other distracting factors will come into play. So I pick from ALL the material I've read and do something that fits the time and location.

But I still did Rookie first, to get the habit and pattern in place.

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Say, who changes our labels from Newbie to Rookie to Recruit, etc? What is the impetus for the changes? Is is forum activity, or fitness gains, or what?

Like most forums, I will assume it's post count.

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Say, who changes our labels from Newbie to Rookie to Recruit, etc? What is the impetus for the changes? Is is forum activity, or fitness gains, or what?

I manually change them. I accept bribes in the form of .....

.... hrm. I'm not certain what I'm bribable with now that I don't eat cookies and I have a fridge full of my own bacon.

In that case, I'll just change it to update rank based on post counts.

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Say, who changes our labels from Newbie to Rookie to Recruit, etc? What is the impetus for the changes? Is is forum activity, or fitness gains, or what?

0-50 - Newbie

51-100 Recruit

101-500 Rebel

500+ Renegade

I don't know what is after Renegade. Yet.

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Does anyone know the limit of fat you can lose and muscle you can gain in a given timeframe? I read somewhere that you can lose 1 lb of fat per week but only gain 1/2 lb of muscle per week. Wouldn't it vary based on individual stats? Just curious - I want to set attainable goals and I don't know how to determine what is attainable for me.

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lutzy: Fat loss is strongly correlated to what your current fat levels are. Obviously it is much easier to shed fat when you have a lot to shed than when you don't. Another thing is that lean mass is almost guarenteed to be lost when attempting to lose fat, and this ratio of fat loss to lean mass loss increases the leaner you already are. So you understand it's hard to stick a number on it. If your picture is accurate, I'd say just eat healthy and exercise and you'll see body improvements one way or another :)

As for muscle gain, I would point you to this article: http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/muscle-gain/whats-my-genetic-muscular-potential.html Very good estimates by a few experts.

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