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Raider86

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Does anyone know the limit of fat you can lose and muscle you can gain in a given timeframe? I read somewhere that you can lose 1 lb of fat per week but only gain 1/2 lb of muscle per week. Wouldn't it vary based on individual stats? Just curious - I want to set attainable goals and I don't know how to determine what is attainable for me.

Everyone is different. Why not set your goals based on other things, since you can't really easily measure bodyfat without calipers and all of that anyways?

Example: run a 7 minute mile, lift 100lbs.

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Thanks, AJ and spezzy. I updated my goals to not focus on the number so much. It is just a hard mindset to get out of, coming from the weight loss world. Now it is about fitness in general and it is hard to get used to the change!

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Angry Bird workout questions ...

I'm apparently thick-skulled and have confused myself, once again. Am I aiming to, over several sets, hit each goal number, or hit each goal number in one try? I did my first workout. I did each exercise once - 30 body weight squats, 11 knee push-ups, 15 rows on each arm with 5 pound weights, and a 30 second plank. Push-ups and the plank hurt my right shoulder like a bit*h ... but the rows do not. Anything I can substitute for the push-ups if it keeps hurting my shoulder so much?

Do I do a second set again later today and add those numbers together before moving up a level? Or does the level up thing only count if I can do the goal in one setting? I'm probably making this way too complicated.

(I did something awesome today - installed a pull-up bar and did 10 inverted rows! Didn't even know I could do them!) Any help anyone can offer would be very appreciated. Thank you - dina

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Here you go, all the details for US citizens with lost passports

http://travel.state.gov/passport/lost/lost_848.html

Report a lost or stolen valid passport immediately!

For passports lost or stolen overseas, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

TO REPORT YOUR LOST OR STOLEN U.S. PASSPORT

Report Your Valid Passport Lost or Stolen By Phone:

Contact us toll free: 1-877-487-2778 (TTY 1-888-874-7793)

Operators are available 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., ET, Monday-Friday, excluding Federal holidays

Report Your Valid Passport As Lost or Stolen Using Form DS-64:

Complete, sign and submit Form DS-64: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen Passport to:

U.S. Department of State

Passport Services

Consular Lost/Stolen Passport Section

1111 19th Street, NW, Suite 500

Washington, DC 20036

If you find another person's lost U.S. passport, please mail it in a sturdy envelope to the address above.

TO REPLACE YOUR LOST OR STOLEN U.S. PASSPORT

To replace your lost or stolen U.S. passport, submit the following forms in person at a Passport Agency or Acceptance Facility:

Form DS-11: Application for a U.S. Passport, and

Form DS-64: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen Passport

IMPORTANT NOTES

Passports reported lost or stolen by telephone or by submitting Form DS-64 are invalidated and can no longer be used for travel.

The information you provide on Form DS-64: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen Passport will be entered in our Consular Lost/Stolen Passport System.

If you recover the passport after you have reported it lost or stolen, please submit it to the address listed above. When you submit it, if requested - we will cancel it and return it to you. If not requested, it will be destroyed.

Once a passport is reported lost or stolen, it cannot be re-validated.

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Noob question coming through. I started SS today (yay!), but I'm a bit confused. At my gym, there was a big rack with a bunch of bars with weights pre-fixed to them and numbers printed on the side. They ranged from something like 15 to 60 lb. Was the printed weight the total weight of the bar, or the added weight on top of the standard 45 that I hear an empty bar generally is? I tried a bar that said 40 lb on it for my first deadlift, and it seemed mad easy, so I can't imagine it was actually 85... or was it?

I figure it's hard to know without seeing it, but I'm hoping this rack of numbered bars is a standard gym thing and you will know what I'm talking about immediately.

EDIT: I found a picture! This! It was like this:

Posted Image

Edited by cosmia

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I wondered this at first in my gym too. And worked out, in my gym at least, that it's the total weight. An easy way to work it out, is grab a prefixed bar, and bar you attach weights to. Set up the "manual" bar so the total is what the prefixed is. Pick one up, pick the other up. Do they feel the same? Not scientific I know, but you should be able to tell the difference that way quite confidently.

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If you ever come across a curl bar without any weight, let it be known they weigh 25 lbs naked :P long bars are 45. If you pay close attention to the size of the weights on the pre-set curl bars, you can see the 5#, 10# weights.

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Should greasing the groove replace or supplement your workouts? This is in regards to my holiday videogaming workout plan of a mini workout every hour or with every death or epic fail. Should i choose a really intense mini workout to replace my usual routine and do that every hour, or should i leave the small workouts as small body weight routines with a few reps and then workout hard/properly every second day as i have been.

Unfortunately i haven't been able to do a lot of my own research on greasing the groove as i'm overseas holidaying (life's tough). But i get home about midnight on Monday and would like to be able to confidently start my workout routine on Tuesday.

Cheers.

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Should greasing the groove replace or supplement your workouts?

Supplement.

For women, should we not exercise during "that time of the month"? I want to keep up with my routine, but I also don't want to overtax my already peeved body.

Eat more iron to make up for the blood loss.

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So.. I've made the decision to go primal and exercise (thank you, Nerd Fitness, for body circuit workouts and interval ideas), but here's the problem I'm running into:

How much should I eat, and what percentage of what? I'm okay with ranges, I just need some idea of where I'm going with this. Call me the kind of person who needs guidelines, I guess?

My goal is -25lbs by April 1st. Is this reasonable? I'm starting out at 277, with a body fat % that is too hideous to post, according to my doctor's office's measurements. I guess if you want to calculate lean body mass, it'd be around 150 or so.

Help. D:

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One choice is to go to myfitnesspal.com and calculate your BMR. That's your weight neutral calorie requirement estimate. Not really accurate but it's a starting point that you can tweak as you execute your plan. Also the suggested nutrient guidelines are based on RDA so based on what your goals are, the nutrient profile will be different.

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Should greasing the groove replace or supplement your workouts?

An extension of this question: If I supplement my workouts with greasing the groove, is it okay to use the same exercises? For chinups, pushups, or squats for example? Or will I wear myself out doing that all the time?

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One choice is to go to myfitnesspal.com and calculate your BMR. That's your weight neutral calorie requirement estimate. Not really accurate but it's a starting point that you can tweak as you execute your plan. Also the suggested nutrient guidelines are based on RDA so based on what your goals are, the nutrient profile will be different.

Okay -- so if I want to do this while eating primal/paleo, how do I adjust the totals?

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Record what you will eat b4 u eat it so that you know how much you can eat without gaining weight. You adjust by eating more or less.

You can also eat until you are satisfied, like many do here, but you run the risk of gaining weight.

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Record what you will eat b4 u eat it so that you know how much you can eat without gaining weight. You adjust by eating more or less.

You can also eat until you are satisfied, like many do here, but you run the risk of gaining weight.

I was more looking for percentage-wise information about what proportion of fats, proteins, and carbs I should be eating.

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An extension of this question: If I supplement my workouts with greasing the groove, is it okay to use the same exercises? For chinups, pushups, or squats for example? Or will I wear myself out doing that all the time?

Yeah, you could if you keep the percentage down when you GTG. An example would be Squats. Let's say you can do 30. 6 would only be 20% of your max, so that would be perfectly fine to do, just stop it an hour or two before your workout. It's really just about training your nervous system to function more efficiently by building up the volume.

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Well, myfitnesspal is a pretty good tip. At the moment it looks like I'm in the range of 20/42/38 carbs/fats/protein.

Actually there's good evidence you're better off setting some hard limitations on your macros over percentages.

Everyone can do better by having adequate protein in their diet. 1g/lb of lean body mass is a general guide. that will usually net you 25-30% of your daily intake.

The only other recommended hard limit is to make sure you get at least 30-40 grams of fat in your diet, especially omega-3's, in order to facilitate normal homeostasis.

Beyond that, mix up how much carb vs fat you take in and find what works for you. Less than 100g of carbs a day will eventually put you into ketogenesis.

One last note: the carb to fat ratio for losing fat vs maintaining body weight is not always the same for a given person. Low carb is implied in a lot of areas to help with fat mobilization, while high-carb is generally recommended for athletic performance.

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Actually there's good evidence you're better off setting some hard limitations on your macros over percentages.

Everyone can do better by having adequate protein in their diet. 1g/lb of lean body mass is a general guide. that will usually net you 25-30% of your daily intake.

The only other recommended hard limit is to make sure you get at least 30-40 grams of fat in your diet, especially omega-3's, in order to facilitate normal homeostasis.

Beyond that, mix up how much carb vs fat you take in and find what works for you. Less than 100g of carbs a day will eventually put you into ketogenesis.

One last note: the carb to fat ratio for losing fat vs maintaining body weight is not always the same for a given person. Low carb is implied in a lot of areas to help with fat mobilization, while high-carb is generally recommended for athletic performance.

The calculator says somewhere in the range of 95g of protein -- which seems like a lot of food to me, I guess? I'm trying to hit in that general area, with the knowledge that some days I'll go over and some days I'll be under. My carb 'limit' is between 60-75g, to make sure I hit that 'weight loss spot'. I did go out and get healthy, raw nuts for a snack -- that may put me nearer the 95g.

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