Jump to content

Ask A Question!


Raider86

Recommended Posts

(hope I'm asking this in the right place...)

 

I have been following the Basic Training body weight routine, and I am about to move up to the Bodyweight Brigade.  My question relates to maximum number of reps: due to some past training experience where we had to do a LOT of squats and lunges, I can still complete 50+ of each exercise per set without any problems.  This is quite boring, and probably not altogether helpful.  

 

My question is this:  should I set an upper limit for the number of reps per set (even where the instruction is to do 'max reps')?  Like, maybe 20 or 30?  I have done this during the Basic Training programme, because I just can't imagine that it is very helpful to just keep squatting/lunging away forever and a day...?

 

Going forward, I could level up the difficulty and work back up to my upper limit, and so on.

 

Thoughts???

Pixie Adventurer

 

Courage doesn't always roar.  Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

Link to comment

Agreed. There are two types of workout - strength and endurance. If you're going for endurance, you want to do as many reps as possible. If you're going for strength, just a few reps are enough... but they have to really push you. If you find squats too easy, you can do fifty or a hundred or whatever and you won't get any stronger for them (though you'll probably be able to run a heck of a long distance without too much hassle).

What happens when you play Final Fantasy VII with everyone called Cloud?

It gets quite confusing... https://ff7crowdofclouds.wordpress.com/

 

Link to comment
Agreed. There are two types of workout - strength and endurance. If you're going for endurance, you want to do as many reps as possible. If you're going for strength, just a few reps are enough... but they have to really push you. If you find squats too easy, you can do fifty or a hundred or whatever and you won't get any stronger for them (though you'll probably be able to run a heck of a long distance without too much hassle).

 

 

I would take those exercises and jump up the difficulty until you can do 10 or less of them.

 

 

Hey - thanks to you both for responding!  The training I used to do was for Muay Thai, so it was kinda endurance focused (3 min per round x 3 rounds doesn't sound like a lot, but believe me - it is when you're the one in the ring!).  Not sure how I managed to hold onto any residual ability to knock out high numbers of squats more than a year down the track, but anywho.... endurance isn't what I'm aiming for now, so will adjust my routine accordingly :)

Pixie Adventurer

 

Courage doesn't always roar.  Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

Link to comment

I've started my third week of being 95% Paleo and working out 6 days (3 days running, 3 days NF beginnger workout), I was chugging along fine, but now I feel super exhausted. What's going on? Any advice or suggestions? Thank you!

You cannot plough a field by turning it over in your mind. - Author Unknown

Race: Wood Elf Profession: Adventurer STR: 1 DEX: 3 STA: 2 CON: 3 WIS: 4 CHA: 3 Level: 2

Link to comment

I've started my third week of being 95% Paleo and working out 6 days (3 days running, 3 days NF beginnger workout), I was chugging along fine, but now I feel super exhausted. What's going on? Any advice or suggestions? Thank you!

 

Are you getting enough sleep and enough water? You need more of both when you're active than when you're sedentary. Are you getting enough carbs (if you're eating paleo, that's mostly going to mean fruit) on your run days? Any of those things could be the culprit.

 

It could also just be your body telling you that you started out of the gate a bit too fast. If you went from mostly sedentary to suddenly working out 6 days a week, that's a big change. You might find that you need to scale it back for a while, either by giving yourself more rest days or by lowering the intensity of some of your workouts. I know when I first started out, I tried to do more than my body was ready for, and I discovered about two weeks in that it just wasn't sustainable at the level of fitness I was at. I ended up scaling way back and taking the occasional extra rest day for a couple months before starting to build back up to the frequency and intensity I was doing those first couple weeks.

only what you take with you

Challenges: Starstuff Wars Episode I, II, III, IV, V, VI  

NF character ~ Fitbit ~ Strava ~ Smashrun ~ MyFitnessPal

Food Log

Link to comment

Starstuff - I believe it's dehydration and lack of carbs/calories. I'm still adjusting to eating a little bit more as it goes against the grain of everything I've had drilled into me for so long. I'm going to try upping my food intake a little bit more, drinking more water, and cutting back on coffee. I'll also take your advice and take an extra rest day. We'll see if it helps! Thank you!

You cannot plough a field by turning it over in your mind. - Author Unknown

Race: Wood Elf Profession: Adventurer STR: 1 DEX: 3 STA: 2 CON: 3 WIS: 4 CHA: 3 Level: 2

Link to comment

Hey guys, 

 

Just hoping to clear some things up.

 

If I am eating roughly what I should be in calories daily (no exercise) 

If I add exercise on some days and drop a few hundred calories below, should I be eating more?

 

I believe I am eating enough to keep myself in a good place but the days I exercise (while I feel fine) I bring my daily calories down significantly down from my target goal

 

Cheers





Northern Ranger, level 1

STR: 3|DEX: 2|STA: 3|CON: 3|WIS: 3|CHA: 1

"Breath and Focus" - Arngeir

Link to comment

Is the so called "Afterburn" effect real? I've heard from a couple NF stories that short bursts of intense exercise actually burn calories better than long runs or walks. Is this true and why? 

STR - 9 DEX - 10 STA - 12 CON - 6 WIS - 12.5 CHA - 5 Level 4 Assassin Soldier 

 

Current Challenge: "Becoming Oliver Queen: Part 1" 

Battle Log: "Will You Commit Yourself to This Program?" 

Epic Quest: "The List" (coming soon!) 

 

Мой аргумент не Ñ Ð²Ð°Ð¼Ð¸ - My argument is not with you. 

 

 

Link to comment

Hey guys, 

 

Just hoping to clear some things up.

 

If I am eating roughly what I should be in calories daily (no exercise) 

If I add exercise on some days and drop a few hundred calories below, should I be eating more?

 

I believe I am eating enough to keep myself in a good place but the days I exercise (while I feel fine) I bring my daily calories down significantly down from my target goal

 

Cheers

 

A few hundred calories below, it isn't the end of the world. If you are wanting to lose weight, this is expected to actually lose anything. A total of 3500 calories is equal to one pound of fat, so if you don't want to lose weight, just add a bit of calories a day, maybe just add some fat to a meal and you should be good (a tablespoon of olive oil is somewhere around 150 calories).

Level 1 Woodwose

STR 5 | DEX 2 | STA 1 | CON 2 | WIS 5 | CHA 4

WAR 0 | RNG 0 | SCT 0 | ASN 0 | MON 0 | DRU 0 | ADV 1

Current Challenge: Specialization is for Insects

Previous Chapters: 1

 

Link to comment

A few hundred calories below, it isn't the end of the world. If you are wanting to lose weight, this is expected to actually lose anything. A total of 3500 calories is equal to one pound of fat, so if you don't want to lose weight, just add a bit of calories a day, maybe just add some fat to a meal and you should be good (a tablespoon of olive oil is somewhere around 150 calories).

 

3500? Do you mean 350?

What happens when you play Final Fantasy VII with everyone called Cloud?

It gets quite confusing... https://ff7crowdofclouds.wordpress.com/

 

Link to comment

Is the so called "Afterburn" effect real? I've heard from a couple NF stories that short bursts of intense exercise actually burn calories better than long runs or walks. Is this true and why? 

 

I'm not an expert, but it's because your muscles go into anaerobic mode from aerobic mode. During aerobic mode your muscles are primarily burning fat which is kind of an endless energy source for most people. During anaerobic mode, your muscles are burning their glycogen stores which is a very finite energy source, which is why the workouts have to be short and intense. Your muscles are also working really hard and probably getting damaged in the process (good, micro-damage). If you do short intense workouts, your muscles burn all the glycogen and then they are looking for energy sources elsewhere to repair the muscles after the workout (this is where the "afterburn" comes in). Essentially, your muscles are repairing and rebuilding and that burns calories after you are finished working out. After aerobic exercise, your body doesn't need to burn extra calories to supply the muscles with energy because you were burning fat while you were working out. Note: Anaerobic is not better than aerobic, it's just different. But this is why weight lifting and/or HIIT exercise is so effective and why people can spend HOURS on an elliptical and never lose a pound.

 

Anyone want to double-check my explanation to see if it makes sense?

Amazon Warrior

29, F, 5'11 ft, 159lbs

#1, #2, #3, #4, #5

 

Link to comment

 

Is the so called "Afterburn" effect real? I've heard from a couple NF stories that short bursts of intense exercise actually burn calories better than long runs or walks. Is this true and why?

The studies I've seen show them to be great for increasing performance faster, such as running speed and endurance, but have shown no evidence of increased calorie burn during the activity. However, recovery costs are heavier due to increased muscle damage form the higher loads required (which is why performance increases), so you need to burn more calories to recover the muscle.

Now, if you are running long and slow 3 times a week with a day between each run, HIIT may be more effective due to that caloric recovery load if you are doing it long enough so that you are burning the same amount during the actual exercise. However, if you run long and slow 5 times a week, you can't do that with HIIT since you won't have adaquate recovery time (having to run multiple days straight). Since you're running less often, your caloric burn will probably be lower.

 

I'm not an expert, but it's because your muscles go into anaerobic mode from aerobic mode. During aerobic mode your muscles are primarily burning fat which is kind of an endless energy source for most people. During anaerobic mode, your muscles are burning their glycogen stores which is a very finite energy source, which is why the workouts have to be short and intense. Your muscles are also working really hard and probably getting damaged in the process (good, micro-damage). If you do short intense workouts, your muscles burn all the glycogen and then they are looking for energy sources elsewhere to repair the muscles after the workout (this is where the "afterburn" comes in). Essentially, your muscles are repairing and rebuilding and that burns calories after you are finished working out. After aerobic exercise, your body doesn't need to burn extra calories to supply the muscles with energy because you were burning fat while you were working out. Note: Anaerobic is not better than aerobic, it's just different. But this is why weight lifting and/or HIIT exercise is so effective and why people can spend HOURS on an elliptical and never lose a pound.

Anyone want to double-check my explanation to see if it makes sense?

Pretty much nail on the head except for why people can spend forever on an elliptical and not lose. The problem is that it has been shown that aerobic activity increases hunger and if you aren't monitoring your diet very well, most people will up their intake to replace those calories burned. Anaerobic training does not increase hunger as much and that replacement doesn't happen to as much of an extreme.

The below is based in nothing at all except what pops into my head as to what may be the cause for this.

I believe this has to do with the afterburner type effect. During aerobic trianing you burn all that energy right then and there during the exercise, get a big energy deficit immediately which your body can not immediately replenish from fat stores fast enough, so it increases hunger to supplement energy replenishment.

For anaerobic, the actual exercise itself doesn't burn as much calories right then and there, so hunger isn't increased as much. however, the caloric recovery toll later on makes up for this. However, that recovery toll is long and slow (taking place over 24-36 hours), so the body may have an easier time replacing it through fat stores.

Like I said, all conjecture as to why we have hunger pangs from one and not as much from the other from a systemic point of view. Only mildly supported by biology in the fact that energy uptake from fat tends to be slow, which is the reason we have glycogen stores in our muscles and liver to supplement as needed for high bursts of activity.

Massrandir, Barkûn, Swolórin, The Whey Pilgrim
500 / 330 / 625
Challenges: 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 31 32 34 35 36 39 41 42 45 46 47 48 49 Current Challenge
"No citizen has a right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. What a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable. " ~ Socrates
"Friends don't let friends squat high." ~ Chad Wesley Smith
"It's a dangerous business, Brodo, squatting to the floor. You step into the rack, and if you don't keep your form, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to." ~ Gainsdalf

Link to comment

 The studies I've seen show them to be great for increasing performance faster, such as running speed and endurance, but have shown no evidence of increased calorie burn during the activity. However, recovery costs are heavier due to increased muscle damage form the higher loads required (which is why performance increases), so you need to burn more calories to recover the muscle.

Now, if you are running long and slow 3 times a week with a day between each run, HIIT may be more effective due to that caloric recovery load if you are doing it long enough so that you are burning the same amount during the actual exercise. However, if you run long and slow 5 times a week, you can't do that with HIIT since you won't have adaquate recovery time (having to run multiple days straight). Since you're running less often, your caloric burn will probably be lower.

 Pretty much nail on the head except for why people can spend forever on an elliptical and not lose. The problem is that it has been shown that aerobic activity increases hunger and if you aren't monitoring your diet very well, most people will up their intake to replace those calories burned. Anaerobic training does not increase hunger as much and that replacement doesn't happen to as much of an extreme.

The below is based in nothing at all except what pops into my head as to what may be the cause for this.

I believe this has to do with the afterburner type effect. During aerobic trianing you burn all that energy right then and there during the exercise, get a big energy deficit immediately which your body can not immediately replenish from fat stores fast enough, so it increases hunger to supplement energy replenishment.

For anaerobic, the actual exercise itself doesn't burn as much calories right then and there, so hunger isn't increased as much. however, the caloric recovery toll later on makes up for this. However, that recovery toll is long and slow (taking place over 24-36 hours), so the body may have an easier time replacing it through fat stores.

Like I said, all conjecture as to why we have hunger pangs from one and not as much from the other from a systemic point of view. Only mildly supported by biology in the fact that energy uptake from fat tends to be slow, which is the reason we have glycogen stores in our muscles and liver to supplement as needed for high bursts of activity.

 

I've never heard this about hunger and aerobic training. I'm always a lot hungrier after anaerobic exercise than long slow aerobic exercise.

Amazon Warrior

29, F, 5'11 ft, 159lbs

#1, #2, #3, #4, #5

 

Link to comment

I've got a question about push-up form. When I was in gym class in middle and high school, I was taught to go to 90 degrees, with arms out to the side (so the arms are perpendicular to the torso), but it looks like your elbows are supposed to be close to your body. Is that correct, and if so, how do you properly do it? It feels wrong to do it that way, but that might just be years of doing it the other way.

Link to comment

 

 Pretty much nail on the head except for why people can spend forever on an elliptical and not lose. The problem is that it has been shown that aerobic activity increases hunger and if you aren't monitoring your diet very well, most people will up their intake to replace those calories burned. Anaerobic training does not increase hunger as much and that replacement doesn't happen to as much of an extreme.

 

I think this is actually an interesting point of discussion - and interestingly may be an individual thing.  I wish I could find a reference, but there was a study somewhere where exercise was correlated with weight loss in some patients, but not others.  There was actually a particular gene that seemed to be associated with whether simply increasing activity actually led to weight loss or not.  I don't know whether most people fall into the responders or non-responders category in this case, though I can say that in my personal case that my caloric intake does not swing as dramatically as my expenditure when I'm physically active.

 

 I believe this has to do with the afterburner type effect. During aerobic trianing you burn all that energy right then and there during the exercise, get a big energy deficit immediately which your body can not immediately replenish from fat stores fast enough, so it increases hunger to supplement energy replenishment.

For anaerobic, the actual exercise itself doesn't burn as much calories right then and there, so hunger isn't increased as much. however, the caloric recovery toll later on makes up for this. However, that recovery toll is long and slow (taking place over 24-36 hours), so the body may have an easier time replacing it through fat stores.

Like I said, all conjecture as to why we have hunger pangs from one and not as much from the other from a systemic point of view. Only mildly supported by biology in the fact that energy uptake from fat tends to be slow, which is the reason we have glycogen stores in our muscles and liver to supplement as needed for high bursts of activity.

If one assumes that one of the reasons we get hungry is lower blood sugar or depleted glycogen stores, this would be consistent with sustained medium-high intensity activity("Cardio") depleting our glycogen and stimulating hunger - whereas lower-intensity work(walking) would still primarily derive its energy from fat stores, and really intense work(sprints, heavy weights) derive energy through systems fueled directly by ATP and Creatine Phosphate and use other sources to regenerate those stores.  There's at least a rational scientific explanation at play here - though some of it may dependent upon individual-to-individual variations in glycogen metabolism.

  • Like 1

"Restlessness is discontent - and discontent is the first necessity of progress. Show me a thoroughly satisfied man-and I will show you a failure." -Thomas Edison

Link to comment

I've got a question about push-up form. When I was in gym class in middle and high school, I was taught to go to 90 degrees, with arms out to the side (so the arms are perpendicular to the torso), but it looks like your elbows are supposed to be close to your body. Is that correct, and if so, how do you properly do it? It feels wrong to do it that way, but that might just be years of doing it the other way.

 

I don't know how correct it is, I've heard both are the correct form. As for keeping your elbows in, rotate your hands so your index fingers on the ground point straight ahead of you. Your elbows should go right beside you. I was actually taught the opposite of this picture:

 

push-up-technique-hands.jpg

If I keep my hands at the 45 degree angle as above, my elbows flare out more than I like.

Level 1 Woodwose

STR 5 | DEX 2 | STA 1 | CON 2 | WIS 5 | CHA 4

WAR 0 | RNG 0 | SCT 0 | ASN 0 | MON 0 | DRU 0 | ADV 1

Current Challenge: Specialization is for Insects

Previous Chapters: 1

 

Link to comment

Question:  I've been doing inverted rows in order to work my way up to a full on pull up, and I think I'm ready to get to assisted pull ups.  I like the idea of using a band, but I'm not sure if the ones my gym has will hold my weight/snap up and take an eye out.  Also, I cant figure out the mechanics of actually getting the band under my feet.  As an alternative, the gym has one of those pneumatic pull up assist doo-dads, but it just seems stupid to me when I could just as easily do more inverted rows.  Any ideas on bands (a make her dance) or the machine?

Level 1 Tauren Adventurer

 

STR 3  |  DEX 1  |  STA 2  |  CON 1  |  WIS 4  |  CHA 4

 

“I don't like work--no man does--but I like what is in the work--the chance to find yourself. Your own reality--for yourself not for others--what no other man can ever know. They can only see the mere show, and never can tell what it really means.†~Joeseph Conrad

 

 

Link to comment

I don't know how correct it is, I've heard both are the correct form. As for keeping your elbows in, rotate your hands so your index fingers on the ground point straight ahead of you. Your elbows should go right beside you. I was actually taught the opposite of this picture:

push-up-technique-hands.jpg
If I keep my hands at the 45 degree angle as above, my elbows flare out more than I like.


Yeah, i actually point my index fingers out at probably a 30 degree angle for the best comfort while keeping elbows in.

Good instruction on proper form can be found here: http://www.nerdfitness.com/blog/how-to-videos/

Massrandir, Barkûn, Swolórin, The Whey Pilgrim
500 / 330 / 625
Challenges: 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 31 32 34 35 36 39 41 42 45 46 47 48 49 Current Challenge
"No citizen has a right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. What a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable. " ~ Socrates
"Friends don't let friends squat high." ~ Chad Wesley Smith
"It's a dangerous business, Brodo, squatting to the floor. You step into the rack, and if you don't keep your form, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to." ~ Gainsdalf

Link to comment

Question:  I've been doing inverted rows in order to work my way up to a full on pull up, and I think I'm ready to get to assisted pull ups.  I like the idea of using a band, but I'm not sure if the ones my gym has will hold my weight/snap up and take an eye out.  Also, I cant figure out the mechanics of actually getting the band under my feet.  As an alternative, the gym has one of those pneumatic pull up assist doo-dads, but it just seems stupid to me when I could just as easily do more inverted rows.  Any ideas on bands (a make her dance) or the machine?

 

I don't know about the drawbacks from the machines, but I'm guessing they don't work the stabilizers, which can lead to not being able to real pullup even the machine says you should be able to.

 

As for using the bands correctly, this video is pretty explanatory:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93gNrOhy5KU

 

I don't know how much you weigh or what ratings the bands you have at your disposal, but I highly doubt they'll snap and put out an eye if you've been building up your strength pretty well with inverted rows.

 

--Edit-- Well, isn't that odd. If you paste a link to a youtube video, it puts the player in. I couldn't figure out how to get the player until this post.

Level 1 Woodwose

STR 5 | DEX 2 | STA 1 | CON 2 | WIS 5 | CHA 4

WAR 0 | RNG 0 | SCT 0 | ASN 0 | MON 0 | DRU 0 | ADV 1

Current Challenge: Specialization is for Insects

Previous Chapters: 1

 

Link to comment

Those bands are heavy and don't snap like rubber bands.  You only stretch them to about 2x their length and when the snap back they don't even travel anywhere. I'd reccomend bands of self assist over the machines.  i tried the same machine you are talking about for a challenge as well as a lat pulldown on another one and made little progression.

Massrandir, Barkûn, Swolórin, The Whey Pilgrim
500 / 330 / 625
Challenges: 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 31 32 34 35 36 39 41 42 45 46 47 48 49 Current Challenge
"No citizen has a right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. What a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable. " ~ Socrates
"Friends don't let friends squat high." ~ Chad Wesley Smith
"It's a dangerous business, Brodo, squatting to the floor. You step into the rack, and if you don't keep your form, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to." ~ Gainsdalf

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

New here? Please check out our Privacy Policy and Community Guidelines