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NemoG

hike training in flat environment

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Hello,

 

Me and my buddy are looking into walking the GR10 (click for details) next summer. 

Summarized it's a 866 km (538 mi) with and Elevation change of 48,000M (157,000 ft) trail from the atlantic ocean to the Mediterranean Sea over the Pyrenees Mountains.

 

my buddy already did 900 KM (approx 550mi) in the jungle of Venezuela. I.... did 40km in Luxembourg..... :flustered: 

so obviously I'm not as trained I did do some alphines in Austria but more elevation then distance and max 1 or 2 mountains (which comes down to max 1 week), and it's been almost 2 years...

 

So, I did see and read the thread about training for hiking. and I understand the concept of hiking with packed backpack to train for your hike. 

How ever, I live in The Netherlands... which is very flat... we have 0! mountains, I just read this artile; "No Mountains no problem" which has some tips, but I ain't a runner we take 40 to 50 days to walk the GR10. prox 20 km per day. easy pase, but EVERY DAY. 

 

I'm thinking, I'll walk as much as possible (at home and so flat), work out some gym/fitness stuff, we already go indoorwall climbing 3 hours a week so the legs should be ok for a bit but extra workout for endurance won't be bad. 

I plan to enter and finish a viking run Hill edition before we leave which should show me some progress and I'll need quite some training.

 

Anyone else has tips to help me build endurance in 6 months for the GR10 ? 

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Normal disclaimers, I'm not a trainer or endurance athlete, but I have enjoyed hiking most of my life.  If I was in your shoes I'd start stacking up mileage.  My training target would be something like 25-30% more than an expected normal days distance (with a loaded pack), several days in a row.  I'd try to hit that target several weeks before leaving so I could lighten my training and get lots of rest the last week or two leading up to it.

 

 

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I was reading a couple hiking books a while back and one recommended using the elliptical for cardio. I'm not a fan of running, so the elliptical is a good option for me. You can go slow if needed and I still feel like I see results. I feel it mimics hiking an incline better if I go slow too. I just ramp up the resistant if I start going fast.

 

It also recommended using a weighted pack. That might have been more for hiking in high elevation though. The rest was strength stuff like squats and weighted step ups.

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Keep in mind ankle and calf strength.  I can train my thighs by walking or running but if my ankles and calves aren't used to the adjustments my foot has to make for incline, slipping, uneven terrain then that is the weak point.  If I have been running on all pavement and switch to a hilly trail run the calves are where I feel the pain and the ankle is the injury I worry about. I find even walking in uneven grass in a park can help.

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In my current challange I want to walk 10KM a week. as its codl here I'll do it inside, we thinking of adjusting the incline each week. 
start at 0% go to 1-3% 3-5% etc. Thanks for the reminder/tip! 

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I agree with jenglish. You should add calf strengthening exercises to your plan. You could do 3 sets of calf raises while holding kettle bells or dumbbells. Climbing will be tough, but descending is harder on your body. 

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Will do, 

 

I got 6 months time, I'll start with adding some Kilometers on my legs, add inclune and strenght traing to it from Jan I think. 

I added training to my challange; 

 

 

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Incline treadmill can help.  I think the calf raises may help more.  Theres no decline setting on a treadmill so it

s only practicing going uphill when downhill can be just as challenging and I've hurt myself more on descent than ascent.  It also does not manage the medial/lateral articulation of the foot.

 

But if you could train on terrain you are training for you wouldn't be asking so all you can do is try to mimic some aspects of it. :)

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