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Finding the right balance


LeverageL1

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Hey guys,

 

On the 12th of December I respawned! The motivation came out of no where but i have lots of it right now and i'm getting myself set up to really smash it. I have another topic in the workout section where I have put quite a bit of information about myself, where I am at and where I want to go. @Mike_d85 has helped me almost perfect my workout that I want and while I continue with that I now want to sort out my diet.

 

I understand the concept of Paleo and I have read some of what Steve has posted (So much reading!) and I have basically done this.

 

  • Removed Dairy, Bread, Cake/Sweets etc
  • Drink only water with the exception of 1-2 cups of coffee a day (Home made on water bit of milk, 3 sugars)

 

  • Focusing on eating Protein (Mainly Fish cooked in tin foil with lemon and a bit of butter and Chicken), Salads and vegies.

 

What I am not sure of is the portions. I am mindful not to go crazy but still unsure of where the right mark is. I want to lose body weight percentage so I am ensuring a caloric deficit but also want to build muscle which means I need to eat more. In my head they contradict each other hence the confusion.

 

Any help regarding this would be much appreciated.

 

Thanks,

 

Leverage.

 

 

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Generally you won't gain muscle and lose fat at the same time. When you're first starting out, "newbie gains" might make that possible but in the long run you'll need to do one at a time. I'd recommend choosing which you want first and either eating at a deficit to lose fat or eating at a surplus to gain muscle. After a while, switch it up and do the other.
Personally (and this is just my opinion) I recommend adding on muscle first as people often find that with more muscle they don't look like they need to lose as much fat as they thought. Also, lifting heavy stuff is fun and more muscle = lifting heavier stuff.

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Well, noob gains are all a beginning sportsman needs in his first year. That can make a hell of difference already.

If bodyfat percentage is still high and nutrition spot-on*, then you may actually loose fat and gain muscle at the same time. It just takes forever a tad longer than a classic build-and-cut-cycle, and for some reason unkown to me, some people seem to have difficulties meeting this sweet spot.
Bulking, i.e. eating a noticable caloric surplus makes gaining muscle easier and a lot faster. Eating a larger (but not large) deficit would speed up weight loss (unless you overdo it and teach your body to shut down your metabolism, which means a former deficit becomes maintenance or even surplus, at a much lower level. You don't want to do that.). As the saying goes, all roads lead to Rome. Well, not all, but many. You can even get away with lowering your body fat percentage at a caloric surplus - when you manage to gain muscle faster than fat. (Which is not that easy.)

I've seen three out of these four approaches work, personally on myself as well as on clients. If you have no problem dieting, you may bulk (focus on building muscle first) and then use your newly gained muscle mass to help you shed the accumulated fat. If you can't stand being hungry, you'll probably want to stay at or near (only slightly) below maintenance and tackle both at the same time. Literally speaking, that would be the longer, but smoother road.
I would NOT recommend tring to focus on fat loss first and build muscle later. If you do not know exactly what you are doing, chances are high you are not only loosing fat, but also muscle. In a worst-case-scenario, you'd loose more muscle than fat, leaving you lighter, but less fit and less healthy than before... and with a drastically lowered metabolism, which makes any further attempt at fat loss even more difficult. I would also not necesarily recommend to the novice the strategy to try to let your muscles outgrow your fat, because you might very easily slip into a classic "bulk", whch requires a "cut" later. But it is possible that you may end this way while trying to follow the "loose/gain-simultaneaously"-strategy when your total calories are slightly above maintenance. Which would not be bad. In the end, you might weigh way more than before, but your body composition would still be better.  

From my personal experience, I'd always prefer the slow, but simple and easy way(s).
Arms, legs and shoulders get bigger/stronger, belly shrinks or stays at least the same -> keep doing what you are doing.
Everything gets bigger -> eat less.
Everything shrinks (and you get weaker) -> eat more.
It's not rocket science... 


* Enough protein and caloric intake meets demand or just a very slight deficit. Enough saturated fat to kep hormones in normal range and sufficient micro-nutrients are also a must.

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Rowing, rucking, running, lifting heavy stuff. Why not do it all?

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Hi @LeverageL1

 

In answer to your question, you should be eating enough that you feel full, but I'm not talking gut bursting full. ;)  Paleo isn't a weight-loss diet per se, but because of the type of foods that you eat while following it, it's kinda hard to consume too many calories, allowing you to lose weight. 

 

General advice tends to be that vegetables should make up 50% of your plate with the other half being your protein or fat. Here is a list of tips for people just starting the paleo diet by people who've been there before. 

 

 

@turboseize has given a lot of very good advice there, but following it does require you to have a handle on just how many calories your body uses (do NOT go by that old 1,50kcal for women, 2,000 - 2,500kcal for men) as well as understanding all the different nutritional terms (and what they are in reality), and a way of measuring them. 

 

There's a lot to take in if you're just starting out and it can be confusing. I'm not sure how much of this is relevant to you, but it's good to have the info out there for other people too.

 

Firstly, you need to calculate your TDEE (total daily energy expenditure). To do this you need to know your BMR (basal metabolic rate. Man! These guys love their acronyms!) There are lots of online calculators out there so just hit up google and you'll get there. 

 

Once you've got your TDEE you can decide on how much of a deficit or surplus of calories you want to maintain. Then of course means that you will need a way of working out how much you're eating, and what it's "macro nutrient" value is. Thats where food tracker apps, like My Fitness Pal, come in. They allow you to work out how many calories you are consuming and what the macros (whether something is protein, carbohydrate or fat) are. It can be quite surprising how much of each macro there are in certain foods. 

 

When it comes to getting "enough" protein you should also know that your body can only use a certain amount per day as there is a limit to how much muscle you can actually build per day. There's not much point in struggling to try and squeeze more protein into your diet if you've already hit that point. I can't remember how to work out how much it is, maybe someone else will chip in? Or good old google to the rescue again. :D 

 

Lots of people work like this, it allows them a lot more control over their bodies and their recomposition, but it's not for everyone. Some people don't want the hassle of tracking every single thing they eat. It's very much a personal choice. 

 

The other thing thats been mentioned above is noob gains. This refers to the increase in strength that comes when you start lifting. Just like starting anything else, when you first start lifting you have to learn how to lift... As you learn your coordination improves, your muscle tone improves, you get decent improvements in strength and muscle gain. It will usually keep going for most of the first year of lifting. Then it starts to get much harder to improve or build more muscle mass. 

 

Sorry, that seemed to turn into a novel while I wasn't looking. :D 

 

Make Life Rue The Day                             Turning back the clock                                                Recipe book  14

 

Life is far too short to take seriously

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On 12/20/2016 at 11:58 PM, LeverageL1 said:

Hey guys,

 

On the 12th of December I respawned! The motivation came out of no where but i have lots of it right now and i'm getting myself set up to really smash it. I have another topic in the workout section where I have put quite a bit of information about myself, where I am at and where I want to go. @Mike_d85 has helped me almost perfect my workout that I want and while I continue with that I now want to sort out my diet.

 

I understand the concept of Paleo and I have read some of what Steve has posted (So much reading!) and I have basically done this.

 

  • Removed Dairy, Bread, Cake/Sweets etc
  • Drink only water with the exception of 1-2 cups of coffee a day (Home made on water bit of milk, 3 sugars)

 

  • Focusing on eating Protein (Mainly Fish cooked in tin foil with lemon and a bit of butter and Chicken), Salads and vegies.

 

What I am not sure of is the portions. I am mindful not to go crazy but still unsure of where the right mark is. I want to lose body weight percentage so I am ensuring a caloric deficit but also want to build muscle which means I need to eat more. In my head they contradict each other hence the confusion.

 

Any help regarding this would be much appreciated.

 

Thanks,

 

Leverage.

 

 

 

Technically increasing muscle mass reduces body fat percentage--it's a percentage. Keep doing what you're doing. You probably know what to do; don't overthink it.

 

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