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deftona

Deffy Eats Her Way Around The World - Deffy's Recipe Book

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Since you didn't get to another country yet, you could always do MORE Irish. Colcannon is yum-tastic. It's really good with bangers or roast.

 

I'm a little late on the paella argument, but I think you're going to find some similar ones in other regions. Arroz con pollo, arepas and jollof all have dedicated variant fandoms.

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Week Three - Mali

 

drapeau-mali--somartin.jpgmali-MMAP-md.png

 

I finally got round to making world food, and on a Wednesday too! How novel. So for this week's instalment of "It's Another Beef Stew!", Mafé:

 

Ingredients: 

 

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First, I browned the beef (1), then moved the browned beef to a plate and cooked then onions until they were translucent (2). I then added the garlic, tomato puree and chopped tomatoes and simmered for ten minutes (3)

 

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I seasoned this, then added the peanut butter and stock. I decided to have okra in this and I read online that to keep it from going slimy I should soak it for 30 minutes in vinegar so this is what I did (1). I used apple cider vinegar. And did it work? No, I don't think it made the slightest bit of difference but it didn't taste pickled either and I worried it would. I transferred the stew to the slow cooker and added another cup of water because I thought it was too thick (2)

 

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Mafe is served with fufu which is a side dish of yams mashed with butter but it seems it is impossible to get yams in the UK. Even when a supermarket claims on its website it sells frozen yams so you make a special trip and drive for miles meaning you leave your boyfriend waiting in the cold after a 12 hour shift because you're looking for said yams, it is still impossible to find yams. The recipe is pretty strict that sweet potatoes don't count but it's all I could get so it's going to have to count. I concede I am yet to try Malian fufu, but I went ahead and boiled those sweet potatoes anyway (1) then mashed them with butter and seasoned with salt and pepper. 

 

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The finished product:

 

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Mafe with the fufu of lies. The stew itself was really good. It was thick and peanutty, but I felt like it should have been spicy so if I were to make it again not as world food I would add some chilli. TH really liked it, although he doesn't really like sweet potatoes. I altered the recipe to serve four people and I have a tub of it to go in the freezer. The mafe and half that plate of fake fufu had 685 calories, 62g carbs, 32g of fat and 39g of protein. I would have this again, but I would definitely make it spicy. 

 

Recipe adapted from here 

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On ‎2‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 0:32 PM, zenLara said:

you're making little valencian angels cry

I'm an American of Basque descent, so I only know the seafood versions from up in the Bilbao area.

 

Then again, I'm also kosher and don't eat shellfish, so I'll watch the drama from over here with some nice biryani from the other side of the world..

8178main-vegetable-biryani.jpg

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Week Four - The Solomon Islands

 

1280px-Flag_of_the_Solomon_Islands.svg.pngsbau.gif

 

This week proved a little tricky because I was supposed to use unripe papaya. I had enough trouble finding any papaya at all and I just picked the greenest one I could find. It was ripe and sweet but it had to do.

 

Green Paw Paw Curry

 

 

Ingredients!

 

IMG_20170308_182250461_zpsp0ywv2ti.jpg

 

First I peeled the papaya with a knife (1) and cubed it. I then chopped the onions and garlic and fried this with the curry powder (2) and then added the papaya (2) and coconut milk. Since the recipe called for an unripe papaya and a cooking time of 15 minutes I reduced this to just a couple of minutes since my papaya was ripe - just enough to warm the papaya up since I didn't want it breaking up into the sauce. 

 

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The finished product:

 

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This was really excellent. I wasn't sure what to expect since it was a coconut based curry using spices from Indian cuisine instead of Thai spices - something I hadn't tried before but it worked really well, especially with the sweetness of the papaya. One of my favourites so far, I would definitely eat this again. 

 

The curry itself only had 185 calories in it, with 31g of carbs, 3g of fat and 6g protein. I served it with red onion rice which probably isn't very Solomon Islands but I didn't even think of this until I was halfway through cooking it. Recipe adapted from here 

 

Next Week: Gambia! 

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Week Five - The Gambia

 

gamb-MMAP-md.pngga-lgflag.gif

 

Chicken Yassa

 

Ingredients:

 

IMG_20170315_094319328_zpsb5es8voy.jpg

 

First I combined all the marinade ingredients and scored the chicken. I mixed this all together with my hands (1) and left it in the fridge for 10 hours. I put the chicken in the oven for 25 minutes and strained the onions, garlic and chilli and cooked this for about 15 minutes in oil until the onions were soft and tender (2) I then added the marinade and the remaining ingredients, plus half a cup of water (3) and boiled this mixture for 30 minutes and seasoned it.

 

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I cooked some garlic rice and served it with the onion mixture and the chicken. 

 

The Finished Product

 

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The chicken was really tasty but I wasn't a huge fan of this dish, despite cooking the mixture on a very high temperature for a long time, a lot of the vinegar taste remained still. It was very spicy too -  not a complaint from me since there is no upper limit with spice for me but TH wasn't too keen. I liked the idea of this dish but I don't think I would have this again. 

 

Recipe adapted from here

 

Next week: Belarus!

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Wow. That is a ton of vinegar. Sorry it turned out overly sour. With over 2 cups of acid it seems like it was destined for that; not sure how the recipe writer didn't realize what they were getting themselves into.

 

Gambia used to be a French colony, right? Seems like you could combine some French flavors and savory stewing techniques to improve the recipe, make a kind of coq au vin with some hot-sour notes.

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1 hour ago, PaulG said:

Wow. That is a ton of vinegar. Sorry it turned out overly sour. With over 2 cups of acid it seems like it was destined for that; not sure how the recipe writer didn't realize what they were getting themselves into.

 

Gambia used to be a French colony, right? Seems like you could combine some French flavors and savory stewing techniques to improve the recipe, make a kind of coq au vin with some hot-sour notes.

 

It was an awful lot of vinegar, I do suspect perhaps the recipe may have been wrong. And no, Gambia was actually a British colony. I have been British my whole life and I don't recognise that flavour profile! 

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Week Six - Belarus

 

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Recipe: Vereshchaka with Draniki

 

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I chopped the onion and cooked this in a little sunflower oil, then added the bacon and cooked until browned (1) I then added the beer and water and brought this mixture to the boil (2) before adding the sausages and letting them cook (3) 

 

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When the sausages were cooked, I chopped them (1) and added them back to the stew. I toasted the flour in a dry frying pan (2) then added some of the broth to make a roux (3). 

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I added the roux to the stew and boiled it until it had thickened (1). I then made the draniki by grating some onion and a potato, I added some salt and then fried this mixture a tablespoon at a time, flipped it and cooked it until it was well browned (2)

 

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The finished product:

 

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I did enjoy this stew, especially the liquid (cooking sausages and bacon in beer, what's not to like) but I wasn't keen on the sausage I used. It was really strongly herbed and it overpowered the other flavours. I would have this again but I would use a different kind of sausage. 

 

Recipe adapted from here and here. The draniki on that plate served us both and the meal came out as 747 calories. 

 

Next week: Bhutan! 

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On 3/15/2017 at 4:00 PM, deftona said:

Week Five - The Gambia

 

Chicken Yassa

 

 

 

18 hours ago, PaulG said:

Wow. That is a ton of vinegar. Sorry it turned out overly sour. With over 2 cups of acid it seems like it was destined for that; not sure how the recipe writer didn't realize what they were getting themselves into.

 

Gambia used to be a French colony, right? Seems like you could combine some French flavors and savory stewing techniques to improve the recipe, make a kind of coq au vin with some hot-sour notes.

 

There is a recipe similar to that that I really love and have made multiple times and it only calls for about half that much vinegar. 

 

http://thewanderlustkitchen.com/poulet-yassa-senegalese-chicken/ 


Now I want to make it again soon. :D

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46 minutes ago, Taddea Zhaan said:

 

 

There is a recipe similar to that that I really love and have made multiple times and it only calls for about half that much vinegar. 

 

http://thewanderlustkitchen.com/poulet-yassa-senegalese-chicken/ 


Now I want to make it again soon. :D

 

That makes sense since I found Yassa was a popular meal all over that region of Africa. I was wondering if I'd got my maths wrong since I actually made 1/3 of the recipe but no - the original calls for a whole cup of vinegar and I used 1/3 cup so it should have been right unless we're talking about different "cups" - I know the UK and US cups are ever so slightly different so perhaps. 

 

Are my photos showing up btw? They are to me when I post them, but whenever I visit this page again they aren't loading. 

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4 minutes ago, deftona said:

 

That makes sense since I found Yassa was a popular meal all over that region of Africa. I was wondering if I'd got my maths wrong since I actually made 1/3 of the recipe but no - the original calls for a whole cup of vinegar and I used 1/3 cup so it should have been right unless we're talking about different "cups" - I know the UK and US cups are ever so slightly different so perhaps. 

 

Are my photos showing up btw? They are to me when I post them, but whenever I visit this page again they aren't loading. 

 

No, I cannot see the photos today. :(

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2 hours ago, DrFeelgood said:

Imgur is a more reliable host than photobucket. :D

 

I've never had a problem until these last couple of weeks, but I will check out imgur.

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17 hours ago, Taddea Zhaan said:

 

 

There is a recipe similar to that that I really love and have made multiple times and it only calls for about half that much vinegar. 

 

http://thewanderlustkitchen.com/poulet-yassa-senegalese-chicken/ 


Now I want to make it again soon. :D

 

Yeah, that one looks way more reasonable to me. The other recipe was missing a sweet component, which the switch from red wine to cider vinegar fills in nicely.

 

I can't help but feel like any place water is called for it should be replaced with chicken stock, though. That, and I've never seen onions added to a marinade in such a way, and I find myself suspicious of the technique -- do the onions weep more moisture after you throw them in the pan? Is it more difficult to brown them? Never tried it, though, so I don't know.

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52 minutes ago, PaulG said:

 I've never seen onions added to a marinade in such a way, and I find myself suspicious of the technique -- do the onions weep more moisture after you throw them in the pan? Is it more difficult to brown them? Never tried it, though, so I don't know.

 

The onions take up lots of flavour from the marinade and I have used this technique before in Indian cooking. When you cook the onions in that recipe, you're not trying to brown them, just make them soft and translucent and it works pretty well. The chicken in the yassa was still delicious, despite the amount of vinegar, it was just the marinade that suffered.

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1 hour ago, Guzzi said:

Subbing because this is awesome.  Even though I have no idea what any of it looks like or what the ingredients are. :D 

 

Welcome Guzzi! I know the pictures aren't showing, I am going to have to find another image hosting site to use. In the meantime, you know the most amazing dish you have ever seen Nigella Lawson cook? Well it all looks like that, I promise ;)

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This is awesome! I'm excited to see Afghanistan, and if you're taking suggestions for a dish there I recommend kabuli pulau. It's so good. (I lived there for a year, taught courses on the country, and would love to go back!)

 

Very cool challenge!

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16 minutes ago, Vaereyes said:

This is awesome! I'm excited to see Afghanistan, and if you're taking suggestions for a dish there I recommend kabuli pulau. It's so good. (I lived there for a year, taught courses on the country, and would love to go back!)

 

Very cool challenge!

 

I just googled that and it looks delicious! I will have to give it a go! 

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France! 

 

I haven't done this in a long time so I decided to get back to it! 

 

Yesterday I cooked a Chicken Chasseur avec Pain de Campagne. Pain de Campagne is a fermented, sour dough kind of bread so I made the starter the day before by making a paste out of the yeast, warm water and flour and leaving it out on the side overnight to ferment. The next day I completed the recipe which was taken from here.

 

The chasseur recipe was from here and to be honest, I didn't love it. I seem to remember I have made this before and I remember it being much tastier than this but since it's a French classic I thought I would give it a go again. I wouldn't repeat the chasseur recipe - I think I could do better off my own back even if it isn't authentic (I think it was the thyme putting me off) but the pain de campagne is fluffy and pillow soft and I would definitely make again. 

 

 


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next time: Poland! 

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