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PollyannaAgain

Linguaphiles Annonymous :-)

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So I said I didn't have anything specific, until I was doing my work yesterday! Here are some nifty websites I found:

This one has Modern Standard Arabic resources: http://www.stlawu.edu/modern-languages/arabic-resources

This one is also MSA: https://edinburgharabicinitiative.wordpress.com/learning-resources/

This one has children's books you can read online, in more languages than Arabic: http://www.childrenslibrary.org/icdl/SimpleSearchCategory?ilang=English

This link is also Arabic, but there's Turkish, Persian, and Hebrew on the site too: http://nmelrc.org/Arabic

 

I was working on Arabic yesterday, obviously...But the children's book site is my new favorite. I read one in MSA that royally...irritated me (Bakkar at the Zoo if you too wish to be angered), and then I read The Bremen Town Musicians in French! I'm going to see if there's an easy Russian one on there today. :D 

 

 

In other news, I stress shopped (better than stress eating, right?) and bought books on Welsh, Breton, and Cornish last week to complete my Celtic language collection (already have Scottish, Irish, and Manx). They arrived this week. :D 

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I fear you guys have already mentioned most resources I've used.

 

Pimsleur: I found very useful to listen to native speakers and start putting together some sentences. I've only done the first few lessons for Japanese, but definitely feel like I got good use out of it. I need to get back to that.

Memrise: Is proving to be alright. I need to sit down and supplement it with flash cards so I can really learn the kanji I've been "taught" so far. Because I can usually guess right when I only have a few options, but that isn't how well I'll need to know them.

 

And those are basically the ones. There is no Duolingo for Japanese, but I'd probably use that in addition if there was. I plan to eventually try iTalki for practicing holding conversations in Japanese. Language learning is currently so far down my list of priorities that it isn't something I'll try right now.

 

~*~*~*~*~*~

 

Btw, I'm pretty sure I hit my five words every day during Week 2. I might have missed on Sunday because of lack of wifi. And that is also part of the reason I haven't been practicing at all this week.

 

~*~*~*~*~*~

 

If anyone have a suggestions for a short poem (maybe a haiku) that we all could translate during week four, I'd appreciate it. Otherwise I'll try to find one tomorrow, because I'll be completely offline during Monday and most of Swedish time Tuesday. So I want to try and get that to you guys before then.

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I heard about newsinslow.com on the radio, which apparently is actual news reports but spoken slowly so you can understand them? They do Spanish, French, Italian, and German. 

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1 hour ago, fleaball said:

I heard about newsinslow.com on the radio, which apparently is actual news reports but spoken slowly so you can understand them? They do Spanish, French, Italian, and German. 

That sounds so cool. Maybe they can add more languages! :3

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2 minutes ago, Dagger said:

That sounds so cool. Maybe they can add more languages! :3

Fingers crossed! If I ever have free time again I might poke around and see if I can find something similar for Arabic. It would be so helpful if that were a more common thing. 

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On 2/9/2017 at 11:03 AM, Dagger said:

Week 4

Mass translation - mods pick a poem/song/short piece and everyone translates into their practice language. Could facilitate discussion between language practitioners on why they did X instead of Y but also maybe get some help from native speakers on translation of idioms, etc. 

Okay. So I am not sure my two suggested haikus are good. If I look at the place I am with my studying, I couldn't translate them, but I wanted some suggestions before too much more of this week goes by.

 

If they are too hard for you, find a poem or similar that you can translate most of yourself.

 

If multiple people are learning the same language, you can contrast and compare translations or pick different ones.

 

From Moonomo

Quote

Haiku: Goal

 

To pursue your Goal-
You need to work on it and
One step at a time.

 

From Haiku by Ku:

Quote

My Goal...

 

My goal – to be known

Not for glory or money

To help those like me

 

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14 minutes ago, Dagger said:

Okay. So I am not sure my two suggested haikus are good. If I look at the place I am with my studying, I couldn't translate them, but I wanted some suggestions before too much more of this week goes by.

 

If they are too hard for you, find a poem or similar that you can translate most of yourself.

 

If multiple people are learning the same language, you can contrast and compare translations or pick different ones.

 

From Moonomo

 

From Haiku by Ku:

 

If this is too difficult (it is for me!), then try creating these sentences in your target language. They're from Tim Ferriss' blog on a post about learning languages. Figuring out their construction does reveal a lot about your target language and can help you with grammar in the future.

 

The apple is red.
It is John’s apple.
I give John the apple.
We give him the apple.
He gives it to John.
She gives it to him.

I must give it to him.
I want to give it to her.

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18 hours ago, PollyannaAgain said:

If this is too difficult (it is for me!), then try creating these sentences in your target language. They're from Tim Ferriss' blog on a post about learning languages. Figuring out their construction does reveal a lot about your target language and can help you with grammar in the future.

 

The apple is red.
It is John’s apple.
I give John the apple.
We give him the apple.
He gives it to John.
She gives it to him.

I must give it to him.
I want to give it to her.

Thank you! Such a great exercise. I hope I can find some time this week to try it. :)

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Just dropping in to say i haven't done any language learning this past week, i was on vacation in London, UK.  It was cool to hear many different languages being spoken out on the streets (that definitely doesn't happen in Dayton, OH); i even saw some romanian flags and i think a romanian center while i was there, which was very exciting!  If i had been alone i would have investigated, but i was with family and they wanted to do sightseeing and the like.  

 

I'll try that sentence translation exercise later this weekend.

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On 3/7/2017 at 2:21 PM, PollyannaAgain said:

If this is too difficult (it is for me!), then try creating these sentences in your target language. They're from Tim Ferriss' blog on a post about learning languages. Figuring out their construction does reveal a lot about your target language and can help you with grammar in the future.

 

The apple is red.
It is John’s apple.
I give John the apple.
We give him the apple.
He gives it to John.
She gives it to him.

I must give it to him.
I want to give it to her.

 

La pomme est rouge.

C'est la pomme de John.  (Or "Il est la pomme de John"??)

Je donne la pomme á John.

Nous il donnons la pomme.

Il ce donne á John.

Elle ce donne á t-il. 

Je doit ce donner á t-il. 

Je veux ce donner á t-elle. 

 

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