Jump to content

1 set ab routines?


Recommended Posts

I find myself getting increasingly bored with doing sets of various exercises. The thought of ending a set of around 6 different exercises and then having to go through it again and again is just making me groan at the moment so I was thinking maybe I just do the one set but include more exercises in it? Would that work? And how many exercises should I do? I know that diet is the biggest factor with abs begin visible. To be honest I'm not sure how much exercise they need anyway or whether you can get by without exercises that target abs specifically.

 

So what would be some good exercises to do? I do get a bit of an issue with lower back pain from time to time (mostly on waking) so I want to stay away from exercises that aggravate it too much.

'A path is made by walking on it'

Character Profile

Strava

Link to comment
4 hours ago, Kaite the Nomad said:

I find myself getting increasingly bored with doing sets of various exercises. The thought of ending a set of around 6 different exercises and then having to go through it again and again is just making me groan at the moment so I was thinking maybe I just do the one set but include more exercises in it? Would that work? And how many exercises should I do? I know that diet is the biggest factor with abs begin visible. To be honest I'm not sure how much exercise they need anyway or whether you can get by without exercises that target abs specifically.

 

So what would be some good exercises to do? I do get a bit of an issue with lower back pain from time to time (mostly on waking) so I want to stay away from exercises that aggravate it too much.

 

A single set of loaded carries should do it.

Link to comment

Most full-body strength routines just have one exercise that focuses primarily on the core, performed over a couple sets. That may be easier -- a big circuit of just ab exercises sounds like murder.

 

Loaded carries are pretty nice, though they do require weight. Deadlifts have a pretty strong core component -- their only downside is they are extremely taxing on the legs as well, so they can mess with your performance in other leg exercises you're doing. They also require access to a decent number of heavy plates.

 

Folks who are interested in bodyweight movements and gymnastics often favor L-sit progressions. They're also great for your shoulders. Another favored one is back lever progressions, which have the advantage of looking badass and are great for back health.

  • Like 1

Cowardly Assassin
Training Log | Challenges: Current8th, 7th, 6th, 5th, 4th, 3rd, 2nd, 1st

Link to comment

Plank progressions and wood choppers might be useful if you're not up to back levers yet.  Planks are recommended that you only do one set per workout, and choppers can give nice results done as a single set with light weight and more reps.

 

http://www.startbodyweight.com/p/plank-progression.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FA3S8CrSOTw

 

  • Like 1

Easeful, Peaceful, Useful... "An easeful body, and a peaceful mind, allow you to become a useful person" -Swami Satchidananda

 

Link to comment
3 hours ago, Sahaja said:

Plank progressions and wood choppers might be useful if you're not up to back levers yet.  Planks are recommended that you only do one set per workout, and choppers can give nice results done as a single set with light weight and more reps.

 

http://www.startbodyweight.com/p/plank-progression.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FA3S8CrSOTw

 

 

 

Now that you mentioned planks, I remembered dragon flags.

 

Once you can do a couple skin the cats, you can probably hold a tucked back lever for a couple seconds, and that's all you really need to get started. But yeah, planks are a good way to build up to the tucked version.

 

If you'd prefer an exercise with movement (I know I do), dragon flags are a great next step beyond planks and sit-ups.

 

As you can see, you've got a fair amount of choice -- it's really about what you think you'd enjoy doing.

 

I prefer L-sits to all of the above, but I'm a shoulder and back health junkie.

  • Like 1

Cowardly Assassin
Training Log | Challenges: Current8th, 7th, 6th, 5th, 4th, 3rd, 2nd, 1st

Link to comment
On 3/21/2017 at 1:42 PM, PaulG said:

 

 

Now that you mentioned planks, I remembered dragon flags.

 

Once you can do a couple skin the cats, you can probably hold a tucked back lever for a couple seconds, and that's all you really need to get started. But yeah, planks are a good way to build up to the tucked version.

 

If you'd prefer an exercise with movement (I know I do), dragon flags are a great next step beyond planks and sit-ups.

 

As you can see, you've got a fair amount of choice -- it's really about what you think you'd enjoy doing.

 

I prefer L-sits to all of the above, but I'm a shoulder and back health junkie.

 

Yeah, I'd definitely like to see smooth skin-the-cats before even considering back levers. Perhaps even Korean dips. Most folks have zero shoulder flexion ROM.

 

Some good ideas here. You could check where you are on movement progressions; there's always another step harder. 

 

Hollows, dragon flags, front levers...

Planks, back levers, planche...

V-ups, hanging leg lifts, L sits...

 

I think the key would be to find that sweet spot where you perform an intense enough progression with enough volume in one set to elicit results. (I haven't so I always go for multiple sets.) Or you could just run through all of them in a circuit once. Perhaps start from the hardest progression you can handle and work yourself down in one continuous set.

  • Like 1
Link to comment

Thanks for all the awesome suggestions guys it'll be good to do something fresh and it gives myself a challenge which is great as things had been getting so stale.

 

I can do an L-sit on bars or a chair arms but haven't managed it on the floor so I'll try out the progression and I'l head over to the local park and see what I can do towards the back lever - I did skin-the-cats as a kid but never knew they were called that.

 

Progression is definiately the way to go. I'm off work so it's down to the park tomorrow woo! :)

'A path is made by walking on it'

Character Profile

Strava

Link to comment

L-sits are awesome, back levers are awesome.

 

It's not uncommon to find them easy on bars and very tough on the floor. Your shoulders need to develop enough scapular depression strength to lift you off the floor. If you put a pair of dumbbells on the floor and use those, that's a great way to develop that strength and work toward the floor.

  • Like 1

Cowardly Assassin
Training Log | Challenges: Current8th, 7th, 6th, 5th, 4th, 3rd, 2nd, 1st

Link to comment
On 3/23/2017 at 4:47 PM, Kaite the Nomad said:

I can do an L-sit on bars or a chair arms but haven't managed it on the floor so I'll try out the progression

 

Yeah, that's very common. A lot of the time people don't have the strength and/or range of motion to pike. V-ups can get your there, then eventually progress to strict toes-to-bar (of course with progessions, usually bent leg --> straddle --> negatives).

 

Sometimes people have the strength to pike to 90, but don't have the shoulder extension strength so their hips drift back behind their hands. This will require more range of motion in your pike, but gives your shoulders some slack. You could work on the support position to develop enough shoulder strength to support your body until you can get your hips forward and at least 90 degrees. Then you can work on extending one leg at a time. Of course as mentioned above, support position always involves scapular depression, so keep your shoulders far away from your ears.

  • Like 1
Link to comment

Maybe you try the Abdominal Hold. To do it, Sit tall on the edge of a sturdy chair (or step with four risers) and place your hands on the edge with your fingers pointing toward your knees. Tighten your abs and bring your toes 2 to 4 inches off the floor. Lift your butt off the chair. Hold this position for as long as you can — aim for 5 to 10 seconds.

Lower yourself down and repeat. Continue this exercise for 1 minute.

 
  • Like 1
Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

New here? Please check out our Privacy Policy and Community Guidelines