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Bean Sidhe

Quest Difficulty : High, No fridge and No microwave lunches

31 posts in this topic

I don't know if I will have access to microwaves at my job so I am in the habit of packing everything with me. Usually whatever I had for dinner is nuked at home and dumped in a thermos. Thermoses work for more than just soup and wet things. I have noticed that dry food cools off more, but not so much as to be inedible. Once I put milk in the thermos and brought along a bowl of cereal (not the healthiest option, but we were low on options and I was in a hurry).

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On 5/24/2017 at 10:07 PM, Bean Sidhe said:

 

We generally use boneless skinless chicken since I don't really like grease. I will have to try making dark meat and seeing how it works. It never occurred to me since I generally only eat dark meat if we are grilling or fried.

 

I'd recommend getting a roasting rack that you can fit inside a roasting pan. These kind of racks let the fat drain off instead of cooking the chicken in its own fat. Also, let the chicken rest for about fifteen minutes when it comes out to allow additional fat to drain off. As an added bonus, if you're weird like me, you can render out the drippings into schmaltz for later use.

 

If you don't want to by a roasting rack, you can line the bottom of your roasting pan with some sliced-up onions, carrots, celery, etc and put the chicken on top of it. This can impart a little bit of extra flavor to your chicken and also serves to keep the chicken elevated up out of the renderings. You can either toss the vegetables out when you're finished cooking the chicken or feed them to your dog. Or any other dog you need to make a fast and lasting bond with.

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On 5/30/2017 at 3:01 PM, Trixie Falsae said:

I don't know if I will have access to microwaves at my job so I am in the habit of packing everything with me. Usually whatever I had for dinner is nuked at home and dumped in a thermos. Thermoses work for more than just soup and wet things. I have noticed that dry food cools off more, but not so much as to be inedible. Once I put milk in the thermos and brought along a bowl of cereal (not the healthiest option, but we were low on options and I was in a hurry).

 

See the few times I have tried putting something not real wet in the thermos, it was really dry and pretty dead by the time I got to lunch. We don't actually keep cereal in the house most days since one Agent of Chaos is lactose intolerant. Plus, I found it is cheaper if I make a HUGE batch of pancakes every Sunday and they eat that for breakfast every morning with homemade fruit syrup and either bacon or sausage.

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13 hours ago, Nomad Jay said:

 

I'd recommend getting a roasting rack that you can fit inside a roasting pan. These kind of racks let the fat drain off instead of cooking the chicken in its own fat. Also, let the chicken rest for about fifteen minutes when it comes out to allow additional fat to drain off. As an added bonus, if you're weird like me, you can render out the drippings into schmaltz for later use.

 

If you don't want to by a roasting rack, you can line the bottom of your roasting pan with some sliced-up onions, carrots, celery, etc and put the chicken on top of it. This can impart a little bit of extra flavor to your chicken and also serves to keep the chicken elevated up out of the renderings. You can either toss the vegetables out when you're finished cooking the chicken or feed them to your dog. Or any other dog you need to make a fast and lasting bond with.

 

I never thought of doing that. I keep saying I want to make my own stocks and broths, but the biggest problem is time. We do a ton of pre-cooking on sundays to get through the week but when its canning season to boot, my kitchen is too small to have anything sitting on it for too terribly long. But I may look into a roasting rack.


My dog is the weird one. He is very particular about his veggies and he will play with them but not eat them. Even carrots get chewed on, but then I find bits of carrots laying around about an hour later. Our previous dog you could just give a bell pepper core to and she was your friend for live. Thanks for the ideas. I will try that.

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On 6/4/2017 at 11:32 PM, Bean Sidhe said:

I keep saying I want to make my own stocks and broths, but the biggest problem is time. We do a ton of pre-cooking on sundays to get through the week but when its canning season to boot, my kitchen is too small to have anything sitting on it for too terribly long.

 

If you have a pressure cooker, you can use that to short-cut some of the time requirements. It works best with beef bones; you can do poultry stocks but they come out greasier than I enjoy. I've heard of some folks using slow-cookers, but I've never tried it.

 

Another option is overnight in the oven, assuming your oven can hold a low temperature. Mine can comfortably sit just below the boiling temperature of water which means I get a good simmer out of it. Put your poultry bones or whatnot into a large oven-safe container, cover with clean water, cover with aluminum foil, and let it simmer in the oven overnight. Then strain out the bones, chill, and do as you like. If Sunday is your cooking day, I'd make the stock Friday night, strain it Saturday morning, refrigerate it all day Saturday, and then package it on Sunday. I make my stock in a big batch (I'm talking multiple gallons) and then portion it out into smaller containers, either jars or freezer bags. It keeps in the fridge for about 10-14 days and in the freezer for about 4-5 months.

 

How difficult is canning? I've got a small balcony going* and the output is much larger than I expected. I hate wasting food. I'm going to try my hand at pickling some of it, but I expect there's a limit to the amount of pickled food I'll be able to stomach.

 

*which is a small miracle considering my apparent inability to put down roots anywhere.

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2 hours ago, Nomad Jay said:

If you have a pressure cooker, you can use that to short-cut some of the time requirements. It works best with beef bones; you can do poultry stocks but they come out greasier than I enjoy. I've heard of some folks using slow-cookers, but I've never tried it.

 

Another option is overnight in the oven, assuming your oven can hold a low temperature. Mine can comfortably sit just below the boiling temperature of water which means I get a good simmer out of it. Put your poultry bones or whatnot into a large oven-safe container, cover with clean water, cover with aluminum foil, and let it simmer in the oven overnight. Then strain out the bones, chill, and do as you like. If Sunday is your cooking day, I'd make the stock Friday night, strain it Saturday morning, refrigerate it all day Saturday, and then package it on Sunday. I make my stock in a big batch (I'm talking multiple gallons) and then portion it out into smaller containers, either jars or freezer bags. It keeps in the fridge for about 10-14 days and in the freezer for about 4-5 months.

 

 

I don't have a pressure cooker. We are not yet at a point where Hubby is okay with he idea of a bomb on the stove. But this could work. We would probably be doing the freezer bags and put it in the freezers to keep. I also saw something about making veggie stock from the scraps of veggies, so I will have to look into it.  Usually canning broths takes a pressure canner, and we are not there yet. I did read a couple places on how to do the broths in teh slow cooker which I will admit seemed like the easiest of solutions

 

3 hours ago, Nomad Jay said:

How difficult is canning? I've got a small balcony going* and the output is much larger than I expected. I hate wasting food. I'm going to try my hand at pickling some of it, but I expect there's a limit to the amount of pickled food I'll be able to stomach.

 

*which is a small miracle considering my apparent inability to put down roots anywhere.

 

Canning is fairly easy. We don't pressure can, but a water bath canning is simple enough. We started by canning just crushed tomatoes since Youngest Agent's garden got big fast. Those are really easy since its Peel the tomatoes if you want (we don't, we leave the skins in, I also heard about running the tomatoes over grater for the same effect), put in pot, squish with masher, cook it down a bit by boiling. Then just add some lemon juice and can. The biggest thing to watch is making sure everything is clean enough and warm enough when you start.  For a good starter book (which is how we learned) I suggest Food in Jars ( website ). She is really good and she does small batches of things so you don't end up with 30 jars of something you hate. After the tomatoes, we went to jams and salsa and fruit syrups so I don't feed the kids "fake" syrup with their pancakes every morning.

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