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Nomad Jay

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Fitness Goals

  1. Bike to and from work once a week instead of driving, in addition to normal work-out.
  2. Do a distance run of minimum 8-miles once a week.
  3. Bodyweight work-out 6 days a week:
    • 3 sets of 20 standard, good-form push-ups
    • 3 sets of 20 bodyweight squats (keister to floor)
    • 3 pull-ups (minimum)
    • 3 chin-ups (minimum)

 

Level Up Your Life

  1. Guided meditation 15 minutes a day

 

Inspired by TheJaysFlight, I have created my own highly scientific and easily quantifiable scale of determination and stick-to-it-iveness as follows:

  • Charlie Brown
  • Samuel Vimes
  • Theodoore Roosevelt
  • Steve Rogers
  • Granny Weatherwax
  • John Wick
  • Spider-Man
  • Batman

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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Welcome, Nomad! These are some great goals! How long is your ride to work?

 

 

Chapter 25: Theophilus is Mostly Done

Volume 1: Meanderings (2015 - 2020): 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23

Volume 2: The Bar and the Bellwether (2021): 24 | 25

 

"May your curse in life be that your hard work is constantly mistaken for talent."

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That's a great distance! My commute is about the same, but flat. Good luck!

 

 

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Chapter 25: Theophilus is Mostly Done

Volume 1: Meanderings (2015 - 2020): 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23

Volume 2: The Bar and the Bellwether (2021): 24 | 25

 

"May your curse in life be that your hard work is constantly mistaken for talent."

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That title is really, really clever.

 

Also, nice goals! I have no idea how people can do a workout 6 days a week. My muscles would just be jelly all the time.

 

Good luck!

If you ever feel scared to do something really fun, just do it. Do it today. then say "What the hell did I just do."

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Field Report

Just a note, normally I will normally write these on Sundays, which are my rest days, but this Sunday I will engaged in an all-day epic quest. I shall share should I return victorious.

 

In my travels I must have stirred up a curse, because this week has just not been great in terms of being in control of my own schedule and life.

  • Monday: 2x 20 push-ups, 1x 15 push-ups, 3x 20 bodyweight squats, 4x pull-ups, 3x chin-ups, 5.16 mile run. 15-minutes guided meditation.
  • Tuesday: 5.41 miles cycling, 3x 15 push-ups, 3x 15 squats, 4x chin-ups, 5.41 miles cycling. 15-minutes guided meditation
  • Wednesday: Medical check-up, no exercise. 5-minutes solo mediation
  • Thursday: 4x circuits of plank, 15-pound overhead dumbbell press, Hungarian twist w/ 10 lb medicine ball, standard push-ups, 25lb kettlebell swings, hanging knee-tucks, rowing machine, declined push-ups (12inch elevation); 30 seconds at each station, 1 minute water break between circuits.  15-minutes solo meditation
  • Friday: 1-miles jog no meditation. Work obligations interfered.
  • Saturday: Rest and hydrate for Sunday's epic adventure.

Goal Grading:

  • Bike to and from work once a week instead of driving, in addition to normal work-out: Steve Rogers
  • Do a distance run of minimum 8-miles once a week: Charlie Brown
  • Bodyweight work-out 6 days a week: Charlie Brown
  • Guided meditation 15 minutes a day: Samuel Vimes

Overall: Charlie Brown

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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Okay, first, that's a mighty fine grading scale you got there. I think you earned yourself a solid Sam Vimes for the week.

 

And also, IDK what your secret epic adventure is, because it is a secret, but good luck with it! I look forward to reading your report.

River Witch, Scout

 

Current quest: Weigh 225 pounds by end of summer 2017 (SO CLOSE!)

Epic quest: Run the whole time in a charity 5k by 02 Feb 2018 (working on it)

 

Daily Log, MyFitnessPal

Current Challenge, Previous Challenge

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Disclaimer: I'm a story-teller and spinner of yarns at heart. Call it a nomad's curse. I sat down to write a quick post and forty-five minutes later I had this monstrosity. All you ultra-marathon runners should keep your sniggering down to a minimum

I'm walking along the eastern shore of Lake Garda in Italy. I've been walking since 6:00 AM. Down the hill in front of me, I can see the small town of Torbole, my final destination. My backpack is eight pounds lighter because I've just drunk the last of the water in my water bladder and I'm now down to my thirty-two-ounce reserve jug. I jog for a few minutes every so often to keep my right hip from locking up. The various aches and hot spots create a sort of white noise in my nerves; my feet are effectively numb. I'm questioning why I ever thought it was a good idea to participate in the William O Darby 40-Mile Challenge.

The Darby Challenge takes its name from Brigadier General William Orlando Darby, the forefather of the modern US Army Rangers and something of a legend within the large US Army. Darby was killed by shrapnel in Torbole on April 30 1945 while leading operations to root out Axis forces around Lake Garda as part of the larger Operation Torch. In 2000, a former Army Ranger, nicknamed Ranger Rick, who had retired in Italy, realized he didn't live very far from where Darby died. He decided to walk entire eastern shore of Lake Garda, about forty miles long, in tribute to the famed soldier and in tribute to twenty-five other soldiers who drowned during a night time crossing operation. The annual walk started out small, just the ranger and a few of his friends, and eventually grew into a larger event. There is no charge for participation, just show up the morning of the event, get your tag, and you are part of the march.

During my last year in Italy, I've made the acquaintance of a handful of US soldiers stationed very close to where I live. Five of them did the march last year and convinced me to join them this year. All the participants meet up outside the Peschiera Train Station at 6AM. It’s a gaggle of US soldiers (some stationed locally, some who have flown over from the US specifically to take part in this event) Italian civilians, and members of the Italian Carabinieri (a sort of civil-military law enforcement agency). Ranger Rick stands in the back of a re-furbished WWII-ear Willy's Jeep and gives instructions. Participants have up to twelve-hours to walk the forty-mile long road from Peschiera to Torbole along the eastern shore of Lake Garda. Food and water are up to you; there are shore-side towns every so often. Walk, run, jog, bear-crawl, doesn't matter, the only rule is that you do the entire course on foot. The march ends at a monument to William Darby and the 25 US soldiers who drowned. We move to the starting line, a colorful collection of assorted clothing types, backpacks, and shoe styles. Ranger Rick fires the starting gun. Three of my acquaintances, whom I’ll call D, G, and L, take off running immediately. They're long-distance runners and in inhumanly-good shape (one of them is in his late sixties and runs ultra-marathons). I and three more acquaintances, K, C, and B, set off at a more relaxed pace of fifteen minutes per mile. K uses his GPS to keep time. We settle into a good rhythm and pleasant conversation. Occasionally someone pulls out their cell phone to snap a photo of the amazing scenery. Anytime we have to stop or pause, we jog a little to make up our time.

At Mile 22, I have to stop and change my socks. B stays behind to do the same while K and C keep walking. I have blisters in a few places and hotspots in others. I apply Band-Aids and spray-on foot medicine. I snack on an orange from my bag. I pull out my music player and headphones since we’ve pretty much exhausted conversation topics at this point. I settle my bag and B and I are off at a light jog to catch up with the K and C. We catch up about 5 minutes later and pass them shortly thereafter. For the rest of the march, it’ll be me and B.

At Mile 24, we run into a goodies stand. A group of volunteers has put out a delicious-looking spread; trail mix, fruit, drinks, various baked goods, all of it free of charge. I snag a proffered cinnamon roll, and two swigs of coffee. B grabs some water and some chips and we’re off again, eating on the move.

B and I continue through lakeside towns, making light conversation and listening to our music separately. The route is mostly straightforward but we come to the odd fork in the road every so often. B checks his GPS to keep us on track and occasionally announces the mileage. We alternate between coastal footpaths, sidewalks, and the shoulder of the road. Occasionally someone will stop us to ask what we’re doing. Between broken English and broken Italian, we manage to convey the general idea. Some shake their head at the idea of marching from one end of the lake to the other, but everyone wishes us luck.

At mile 34, we run into the same group of volunteers we met earlier. They pulled up stakes when it looked like the last of the marchers had gone by and set up farther down the road. We don’t stop for anything this time, but I’m regretting it a half-mile later and pull a can of Pringles out of my bag. Yeah, these little crisps are made of only forty-percent potatoes (the rest is flour, oil, salt, and, I swear, crack) and terrible for me, but I’ve been sweating heavily and right now all I want is carbs and salt. Plus those tubes do make for good storage in a back. B and I pass the chips back and forth and lapse into silence. Conversation topics are all but exhausted and neither of us really has the energy for conversation anyway. K and C catch us, having found their second wind, and pass us.

The last five miles of the walk don’t go through any towns. The course runs along the cliff-side automobile roads that lead to Torbole. The motorist give us space, but B and I move to pedestrian walkways any chance we get. Pedestrian walkways, in this case, are somewhat suspect metal plates with rails bolted to the sides of bridges. There are no pedestrian walkways in the tunnels however. B and I find ourselves wishing we had brought headlights.

I jog every now and then to give my feet a change of pace and keep my right hip from locking up. The gradual incline we’ve been on levels out and begins an equally gradual descent. I jog a little more frequently, trying to take advantage of gravity. I see the sign for Torbole and stop for a ten-second stretch. When B comes into view behind me, I point to the sign and pump my fist. B asks if I know where in Torbole we go, and I shrug.

We take the path into town, shuffling along the sidewalk like zombies. We follow the sidewalk, keeping our eyes out for the orange arrows that sometimes mark splits in the road. B and I are so intent on looking for arrows that we almost run smack-dab into another participant. “You guys are almost there,” he says, “Make a left and then a right and then straight to the monument.” Heartened, B and I pick up our heads and try for a strong finish. We round the corner into the piazza. We see four Italians dressed in WWII US uniforms. Ranger Rick is standing in his jeep with a bullhorn. “Through the finish line! Then up the steps and touch both monuments and you’re done!”

Ben and I walk past the finish line flag. We grunt up six steps and touch the first monument, the one that honors Colonel Darby. I look at B before we touch the second monument. “We started together, we finish together.” I say. B slaps me a high-five. “On three,” I tell him. “One, two, three.” We slap the second marble monument, the one honoring the drowned GIs, simultaneously and I end my timer. B and I just did forty miles in ten hours and ten minutes, on the nose.

D, L, and G (our inhuman acquaintances, the ones who ran) finished anywhere from two to three hours before us and are waiting in the piazza. L pulls two beers out of a cooler and hands one each to B and I. We thankfully take it and sit down. K and C find us. They finished thirty minutes ahead of us, at a cost. K’s toe is de-gloved, the skin rubbed raw in his shoes. I refuse to remove my shoes until I get home. I don’t want to think about what’s waiting underneath my socks.

B and I drink our beer and make small talk. We stop every few minutes to cheer from other participants passing the finish line. “Make it to the monument!” we yell. “Almost there!” I pull on my windbreaker and lay down on the warm piazza stones with my feet elevated on the bench. I nurse my beer and watch the other participants. Some of the US officers are doing headcounts to determine who is still walking. Other participants are ordering food in trattorias and pizzerias on the piazza. Some of the locals and tourists are milling about asking questions and laughing at the people crazy enough to do this. Civilian journalists, Army journalists, and families of participants are snapping pictures of everything. B’s wife takes a photo of him and me raising our beers in salute. The costumed Italians are posing for pictures with anyone who asks and shaking hands with everyone. It’s not a party atmosphere, but everyone is quietly jubilant and the beer and wine flows relatively freely.

At 5:40PM, there is a short ceremony on the steps of the piazza church. The bell tolls twenty-five times, once for each drowned soldier. A representative from the US cemetery in Florence reads the names of the dead. The mayor of Torbole gives a short speech, translated into English by the event organizers. The event organizers introduce a local war historian who specializes Operation Torch (the Allied offensive in 1945). They also introduce an eighty-year old Torbole resident who was witness to Operation Torch. The elderly man, who was nine years old at the time, assisted his father in saving the life of a US GI who otherwise would have been numbered among the drowned. The event organizer thanks us for coming out. This year’s participation is about one-hundred-fifty, double from what it was last year. He urges everyone to come back next year and bring a friend, with the aim of doubling participation.

At 6:00PM, Ranger Rick calls it. He hands out awards for the fastest Italian (a Carabinieri who finished in five-and-a-half hours), the fastest American (a colonel who finished in six-hours-forty-five minutes), the youngest participant (the thirteen-year-old daughter of a US soldier), and the participant who traveled the farthest (a US soldier from Fort Bragg, North Carolina). Ranger Ricks gives an additional one-hundred euro to the American colonel. He cites it as a reward for taking away the US record from the Air Force. (My Army acquaintances explain to me that the Army and the Air Force have a friendly rivalry. “Well, mostly friendly,” D adds.) A handful of participants finish while Ranger Rick is still talking. We quietly urge them to walk up the steps and touch the monuments. They didn’t meet the time-hack but they refused to quit nevertheless. Refusing to quit seems to count a lot for military types.

After the ceremony, we make a short but now arduous walk to the relay vehicles. Our driver, a good-natured Army sergeant, cracks the windows and announces “Just want you all to know that y’all smell wonderful. Truly.” There’s light chuckling and fifteen minutes later the van is quiet as all of the passengers pass out.

The march took its toll. Twenty-four hours later, I’m still dehydrated. I’m sunburned. Depending on whose math you believe, I burned anywhere from four-thousand to sixty-two-hundred calories over the course of the day. I came out six pounds lighter (I weighed myself before and after, out of curiosity). I lost another two and a half pounds over the course of a night’s sleep. My right hip was almost immobile this morning. My feet are spectacularly blistered. And do you want to know the worst part?

I’m considering how I can make it back to Lake Garda next year to do it again.

TL;DR: I walked 40 miles in 10 hours and 10 minutes. My feet hurt. A lot. I hope I did the Scouts proud.

  • Like 2

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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On 5/2/2017 at 0:33 PM, noxiousGnome said:

Damn. Enough said impressive

Thank you. It's definitely an experience that will stick with me.

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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Weekly Field Report.

Not a great week overall.

  • Monday: Ibuprofen and not much else.
  • Tuesday: See Monday.
  • Wednesday: air-squats 3x 15, push-ups 3x15, 12 minutes unguided meditation
  • Thursday: 15 minutes guided meditation
  • Friday:
    • AM: push=ups, 1x20, 2x15; 1x20 airsquats, 2x2.9 mile jog (~24 minutes), 13 minutes unguided meditation
    • PM: 1.12 mile walk, 3x L-seat chin-ups (I got some strange looks from the other folks at the bus-stop)
  • Saturday: air-squats 3x20; push-ups 2x20 1x17; 5.59-mile run (46:18); chin-ups x4

Goal Grading:

  • Bike to and from work once a week instead of driving, in addition to normal work-out: Weather and work schedules did not permit this week.
  • Do a distance run of minimum 8-miles once a week: I'm giving myself a by on this one.
  • Bodyweight work-out 6 days a week: Charlie Brown
  • Guided meditation 15 minutes a day: Charlie Brown

Overall: Charlie Brown

 

While my muscles have healed, my blistered feet are still a problem. I'll be switching my distance running goal to a distance biking goal to give my feet time to heal.

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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Weekly Field Report

A better week than last week.

  • Monday: Push-ups 3x15 (60s rest), air squats 3x20 (60s rest), weighted lunges 3x10 each leg (25lbs held on side of forward leg, 60s rest), leg raises 3x10 (60s pause), prone cobra 3x60s (30s rest), chin-ups 2x4 (60s rest), pull-ups 2x4 (60s rest). 1-2min between exercises
  • Tuesday: No exercise. 15 minutes meditation
  • Wednesday: Bike to work 5.41miles in 27:40; Push-ups 3x20 (90s rest), air-squats 3x20 (60s rest), prone cobra 3x60s (30s rest), leg-raises 3x10 (60s rest), chin-ups 2x3 (60s rest), pull-ups 2x3 (60s rest); bike home, 5.41 miles in 28:22. 15 minutes guided meditation
  • Thursday: Bike to work 4.47 miles in 23:23; push-ups 3x20 (60s pause), [5-yard tire flip, 3x declined diamond push-ups (6-inch elevation)] x6, 3x20 air-squats, 2x3 chin-ups, 2x3 pull-ups, 4x5 parallel dips, 2x chin-ups, 1x pull-up; bike home 4.47 miles in 23:20. 15 minutes guided meditation
  • Friday: An acquaintance invited me to do a "prison yard workout" with some of his friends. While I can't remember exact work-out, it was four rounds of various exercises to include: tire flips (where did they find a tire that big?!), tire flip burpees, hammer swings (hitting a big tire with a 15-lbs sledge-hammer) push-ups, chin-ups, air squats, 25-lbs kettle bell swings, bench dips, suicides, sprints, jumping jacks, and military presses. Considering the high reps on each, I definitely met the intent of my daily body-weight workout. I'm waiting on my acquaintance to send me the full workout and I'll repost it.
  • Saturday: Push-ups, 3x20 (90s rest), 10.07 miles in 43.09.

Goal Grading:

  • Bike to and from work once a week instead of driving, in addition to normal work-out: Steve Rogers (I met my goal and did a little extra.)
  • Do a distance run of minimum 8-miles once a week: Theodore Roosevelt (My feet are still messed up, so I'm counting Saturday's bike ride)
  • Bodyweight work-out 6 days a week: Theodore Roosevelt.
  • Guided meditation 15 minutes a day: Samuel Vimes.

Overall: Theodore Roosevelt

 

Notes:

  • I'm learning I'm pretty bad at daily consistency (doing the same thing every day). I don't mind working out six days a week, I just need to vary it. To be fair to myself, most folks don't recommend doing the same exercises every day. That's something to consider during my next challenge.
  • I don't like meditating when I'm tired (fear of dozing off I suspect). Unfortunately the end of the day is my best window for meditating. I should look at restructuring my day to overcome this.
  • My employer has a deal with the local "Wellness Center" for some free exams and assessments, including body fat percentages, metabolic testing, VO2 max and the like. I took advantage of some of those this week and I'll be factoring those into my goals for the next sets of challenges.
  • [TMI warning] The ugly blisters on my heels finally drained this week. The areas are still tender and I have a slight limp in the wrong shoes, but they're healing nicely and I expect I'll be running short mileages within the next two weeks. I've been walking barefoot a lot which has helped. I'm looking into minimalist shoes as I retrain.
  • Like 3

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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On 5/14/2017 at 3:08 AM, Nomad Jay said:

[TMI warning] The ugly blisters on my heels finally drained this week. The areas are still tender and I have a slight limp in the wrong shoes, but they're healing nicely and I expect I'll be running short mileages within the next two weeks. I've been walking barefoot a lot which has helped. I'm looking into minimalist shoes as I retrain.

 

Let me tell you about my chafing: jk.  My feet perpetually look nasty so I guess that's to be expected, but blisters are a rarity for me as long as I'm in socks designed for running.  It took forever for me to sort out, but it turns out not buying the bulk packages of hane's socks led to more comfortable runs.  I like Feetures! socks, but I got some good use out of some cheap-ish Champion running socks from Target.  YMMV.

 

Edit: I realize you were hiking, but they make specialty stuff for that, too.  I'm just saying maybe blisters can be avoided with a small investment.

My Battle Log 

I'm on Strava for my running now.

Check out Kick! too.  You unlock gear with your progress on Strava.

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On 5/16/2017 at 9:45 PM, Mike_d85 said:

I'm just saying maybe blisters can be avoided with a small investment.

 

Yeah, in hindsight I wasn't particularly smart about this. There's a little voice in the back of my head that says "power through it!" There are days I really should NOT listen to that voice. This was one of them.

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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On 5/17/2017 at 7:22 AM, Sloth the Enduring said:

Your Friday workout sounds awesome.

For a given value of awesome, yes. Round 3 was the worst. At least with Round 4 you knew you were done.

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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Weekly Field Report

[Note: This week I discovered I've been confusing pull-ups and chin-ups (palms in vs palms out) for my entire life. All my previous logs have them backwards. I'm not going to edit them.]

  • Monday: Push-ups 3x20 (90s rest), barbell squats 6x10 (45s rest), bench press 1x5x45lbs (bar) 1x5x65lbs 4x8x95lbs (45s rest), leg raises 3x10 (60x rest), prone cobra 3x60s (30s rest), 3x chin-ups 3x pull-ups (60s rest), 2x chin-ups 2x pull-ups. 15 minutes guided meditation.
  • Tuesday: Bike to work (5.41 miles in 24.45), push-ups 3x20 (90s rest), air-squats 3x20 (90s rest), bike home (5.41 miles in 22.32), 6x pull-ups. Attempted mediation, fell asleep where I sat.
  • Wednesday: push-ups 3x20 (90s rest), air-squats 3x20 (60s rest), 2.24 mile run in 13.03
  • Thursday: Nothing. Thursday was pretty chaotic. I still have no excuses.
  • Friday: push-ups 3x20 (90s rest), air-squats 3x20 (60s rest), pull-up x6
  • Saturday: push-ups 3x20 (90s rest), air-squats 3x20 (60s rest), pull-ups x6

 

Goal Grading:

  • Bike to and from work once a week instead of driving, in addition to normal work-out: Theodoore Roosevelt
  • Do a distance run of minimum 8-miles once a week: Charlie Brown
  • Bodyweight work-out 6 days a week: Steve Rogers
  • Guided meditation: Charlie Brown

Overall: Samuel Vimes

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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Challenge Report:

Goal 1: Bike to and from work once a week instead of driving, in addition to normal work-out.

Result: I biked into work at least once a week, sometimes twice a week.

Grade: A

 

Goal 2:Do a distance run of minimum 8-miles once a week

Result: My long walk messed up my feet (my foolishness, I know) so I didn't run. However I did some long bike rides as a replacement, thought not at my normal 2:1 ratio.

Grade: C+

 

Goal 3: Bodyweight work-out six days a week

Result: I did at least 5 days every week. Push-ups and air-squats were easy. Finding a place for pull-ups was more difficult than finding a place for chin-ups, so some days I doubled my pull-ups to make up for not doing chin-ups.

Grade: B-

 

Goal 4: Guided meditation 15 minutes a day.

Result: I am terrible at this. I skipped days, fell asleep on others, was terribly inconsistent

Grade: F

 

Overall Challenge Grade: B-

 

Other thoughts (in no particular order):

  • I learned that I'm not very good at daily repetitions. Every-other-day goals are probably more attainable, at least at first.
  • Seeing progress was heartening. 3 sets of 20 push-ups was rough the first week, but not so bad by the last week. Granted, I added an additional thirty seconds rest, but still.
  • Like 3

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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5 hours ago, Primeval said:

Great job on your challenge!!!

 

I was just wondering if you were going to give yourself a final "stick-to-it-iveness" rating. :) 

 

Final "stick-to-it-iveness" rating: Samuel Vimes

  • Like 1

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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