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Brawlrus

General power vs. Sport specific power

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I intend to join a local strongman gym, with my focus being on speed/power, but does general power have enough crossover to sport specific power?

What I mean is, should I be focusing on things like hang/power cleans for shot put, or should I be developing the specific shot put movements? I can see maybe power clean and jerk being useful, since the SP relies heavily on the power position throughout the rotation, or the glide techniques.

 

Anyway, I appreciate thoughts on this. Oly stuff isn't my milieu, so I'm not overly familiar with its practicality.

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11 minutes ago, Taddea Zhaan said:

@Brovatar Korra does strongman and might have some thoughts. I have thoughts, but I don't do strongman. I'll wait to reply until others chime in. 

That's fine, I'm not really doing strongman. I'm just joining a strongman gym, because the owner makes it a point to have all the cool stuff.

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Whether strongman training will make you a better shot putter or not isn't really the question you need to ask. The question you need to ask is: given your current skill level, would being stronger make you a better shot putter?

 

General strength is never a weakness. Your sport specific training can then utilize that strength to achieve better results. 

 

My original plan was to come here and post links to a few articles that basically explained this point, but I'll be damned if I can find them now. So I'll just come through with the points that I've managed to gleam from my years as an underpants collector (but please feel free to ignore me in the face of differing evidence, just because this is my understanding doesn't make it correct):

 

1) specificity can build specific strength and aid in the development of skill

2) at a certain point, without improving general strength, specific strength no longer increases

3) the addition of general strength training to a sport specific training program isn't going to make you worse at your sport, but it may make you stronger, and therefore better at your sport (unless you can list a specific sport where being too strong is a weakness, I'm sticking to this belief).

 

On top of that, strong man competitors train for the highland games, which includes a shot put variant, so there is a chance they'll understand what you need to get better at your sport anyway. Plus it wouldn't hurt to ask them.

 

Just my thoughts on the whole thing.

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3 hours ago, Juni0r83 said:

Whether strongman training will make you a better shot putter or not isn't really the question you need to ask. The question you need to ask is: given your current skill level, would being stronger make you a better shot putter?

 

General strength is never a weakness. Your sport specific training can then utilize that strength to achieve better results. 

 

My original plan was to come here and post links to a few articles that basically explained this point, but I'll be damned if I can find them now. So I'll just come through with the points that I've managed to gleam from my years as an underpants collector (but please feel free to ignore me in the face of differing evidence, just because this is my understanding doesn't make it correct):

 

1) specificity can build specific strength and aid in the development of skill

2) at a certain point, without improving general strength, specific strength no longer increases

3) the addition of general strength training to a sport specific training program isn't going to make you worse at your sport, but it may make you stronger, and therefore better at your sport (unless you can list a specific sport where being too strong is a weakness, I'm sticking to this belief).

 

On top of that, strong man competitors train for the highland games, which includes a shot put variant, so there is a chance they'll understand what you need to get better at your sport anyway. Plus it wouldn't hurt to ask them.

 

Just my thoughts on the whole thing.

It makes sense that general strength could only help me. I did throw braemar with some Highland guys for awhile. They have a couple variants on hammer, too. I know there are a few competitive strongmen there, so maybe I'll pick their brains.

 

I guess the crux of my question boils down to something like, since the shot is in one hand, would 1 arm c&j's be better for me than barbell, or does the increased load of the barbell equate to more overall power and explosiveness? Perhaps a mix of the two? I feel like it seems logical that 1 arm c&j's would help, but I also don't want to muddy the waters too much and have too many useless lifts if they aren't going to help me throw 60 feet.

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Hey there! I have competed in strongman, highland games, weightlifting, and powerlifting. I am not a strong thrower though. I do have a friend that DOES shot put, he almost qualified for the Rio Games, and he does barbell training (bilateral) all the time to build general strength. Every time I see him in the gym he's doing some type of cleans, bench, presses, etc. He also does incline bench with DB quite a bit. For what that's worth. 

 

I also totally agree with everything Juni0r83 said.

 

30 minutes ago, Brawlrus said:

I guess the crux of my question boils down to something like, since the shot is in one hand, would 1 arm c&j's be better for me than barbell, or does the increased load of the barbell equate to more overall power and explosiveness? Perhaps a mix of the two? I feel like it seems logical that 1 arm c&j's would help, but I also don't want to muddy the waters too much and have too many useless lifts if they aren't going to help me throw 60 feet

 

I think you're spot on here. For general power keep the movements general (bilateral) and for specific training get as specific as you can (throw stuff!)

 

Having said that, one arm snatches are FUN to vary things up on a boring day. 

 

And definitely talk to the competitors at the gym, I bet they'll have a great advice and will be more than happy to share their knowledge.

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@Brovatar Korra pretty much nailed it here. General movements for general strength, specific movements for specific strength.

 

just remember, I can't think of a sport that doesn't rely on whole body capacity. No Point training a single point if your whole body is going to be required.

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