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How to make hard boiled eggs taste better?


Wolfy

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Hey all! So I've been trying to eat more primal, nordic diet and have been trying to eat eggs in the am. At my job they have hardboiled eggs pre-made, but they taste so nasty. Any suggestions on how to make a hardboiled egg taste better? I've tried salt and pepper and it helps a little, but not enough. 

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I went to read up on pickled eggs in Wikipedia and discovered that in Dongyang, China, they make eggs boiled in the urine of young boys.  As food.  o.O

 

That would probably make the eggs taste, uh, "different," but probably not better.  Might try pickling though.

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Folks have drunk urine for weirder reasons. At least once it's boiled, the pee really is sterile...

 

I hope...

 

Speaking of China, one considerably more appetizing preparation is salted and preserved duck eggs, which are fermented and eaten as a side dish. Apparently, they are quite delicious and the fermentation adds a lot of savory character. I haven't gotten around to trying them myself.

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As a person who doesn't love eggs, I find that the hard-boiled variety only taste good if they're fresh/warm, otherwise bleh.

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Late to the party, I know, but... PALEO SCOTCH EGGS. It's the Awesome. You just make Scottish eggs, without the bread crumbs. Wrap egg in  breakfast sausage, bake in oven. Delicious. I have to wait until I'm not too lazy to make paleo breakfast sausage, though, because all of the store breakfast sausage  I can find has sugar.

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I make baked (somekind of) 'mac n' cheese' but use chopped hardboiled eggs as the 'pasta'. Can make them in muffin cups for easier portioning but I'm not sure if they can be frozen. 

 

On 6/24/2017 at 6:06 AM, PaulG said:

Speaking of China, one considerably more appetizing preparation is salted and preserved duck eggs, which are fermented and eaten as a side dish. Apparently, they are quite delicious and the fermentation adds a lot of savory character. I haven't gotten around to trying them myself.

 

If these are what you're referring, can attest that they're very delicious and I eat them as they are (cut in half with shell on, scooped with a teaspoon). They're sold both cooked (boiled/steamed or charcoal roasted/grilled) and raw. There are also recipes that use the yolk as sauce/gravy materials. 

 

Salted-eggs%25C2%25A9.jpg

 

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13 hours ago, Kimnara said:

I make baked (somekind of) 'mac n' cheese' but use chopped hardboiled eggs as the 'pasta'. Can make them in muffin cups for easier portioning but I'm not sure if they can be frozen. 

 

 

If these are what you're referring, can attest that they're very delicious and I eat them as they are (cut in half with shell on, scooped with a teaspoon). They're sold both cooked (boiled/steamed or charcoal roasted/grilled) and raw. There are also recipes that use the yolk as sauce/gravy materials. 

 

Salted-eggs%25C2%25A9.jpg

 

 

Yeah, most of the preparations I've seen are for the ones that are raw/fermented, using the yolk as a sauce component and the set whites much as you'd use scrambled egg in any stir-fry-type dish.

 

I've gotten interested in fermented foods as a way to add savoriness to low-cal dishes and still keep them high-protein. Duck eggs aren't ideal for a low-cal dish, but other things often are (salted/preserved black crab, salted shrimp, salted black soybeans, doubanjiang -- all both delicious and high in protein). At some point, when I'm not cutting, I'm thinking of doing some more fun things with the duck eggs and maybe posting on the recipe forum. 

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I hate boiled egg yolks. Taste like powder. What I've found is that I cook them too long. So now I put them in water, wait for the water to boil and then cover them up for 5-6 min (depending how long I left them to boil) and then immediately dump out the water and cover them in the coldest water I can get out of the tap several times to stop the cooking process. Then they are far better. I also add salt, ketchup and hot dog wieners (just boil them in water before hand since they take longer) or I just have the eggs with leftovers, since I would have to eat four eggs and over to actually feel sated if I ate the eggs with no other main ingredient. 

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Late to the thread but I am just gonna pop in and second @Echoceanic on that how you cook eggs is critical to how tasty they are. Overcooked egg is like rubber around chalk. 

 

For boiling eggs, I have a pretty reliable process (this works for large chicken eggs, if you have duck or smaller chicken eggs you'll need to adjust the times)

 

First thing: get your eggs, stick them in a pot (there should be a bit more room than needed so they can roll around and so water can flow around them). Fill the pot to about 1" over the eggs. If your eggs are very fresh, add a bit of vinegar to the water (makes them easier to peel). Bring to a boil uncovered.

 

As soon as it's boiling, turn off the burner and cover the pot. Then set a timer according to how you like your yolk:

 

runny - 4 minutes

semi-soft - 6 minutes

Semi-hard - 8 minutes

Hard boiled - 10 minutes

 

When the timer sounds,  immediately drain it and submerge the eggs in ice water until you can handle them to peel them. (About 2-3 minutes IME). Ice water is important because the eggs will continue to cook as long as they're hot.

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On 6/16/2017 at 6:47 PM, Defining said:

Mustard ;)

Seconding! I love mustard on my hard-boiled eggs.

My other favorite way to eat them is soaked in beet juice. I've made my own pickled beets before, but typically I just pick up a jar at the store and as soon as I've eaten enough to have room in the jar, I start stuffing in eggs. They need at least 24 hours to really soak in the flavor, but if you leave them too long, they get rubbery. (I almost never have that problem, usually I'm struggling to leave them long enough to reach peak flavor)

 

On 9/9/2017 at 6:16 PM, Echoceanic said:

immediately dump out the water and cover them in the coldest water I can get out of the tap several times to stop the cooking process.

This is super important. They will definitely end up overcooked if you don't cool them quickly.

 

1 hour ago, chemgeek said:

f your eggs are very fresh, add a bit of vinegar to the water (makes them easier to peel).

I haven't heard of this, but I have added a teaspoon of baking soda, and it does help.

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